Get Sound Financial Advice From Lulu Authors

With all this talk of bail-outs, recessions and slumping markets, I’m itching to yank my money out of the bank and throw it under the mattress. Ok…maybe I wouldn’t go that far, but I can’t help feeling a little antsy about my finances during these difficult times. And I know I’m not alone.

Luckily, I’m here to ease your tensions with a list of books from Lulu to help alleviate some of those money woes.

One of the most common financial problems experienced today is debt. If you find yourself in that boat, check out Janine Bolon’s book, Ditching Debt . This financial guide provides easy principles on how to deal with the debt you already have and how to prevent yourself from incurring more.

Also plaguing the minds of most working Americans today is retirement. In Secure Your Retirement , Lulu author John Mahaney shares his personal story of how, after his early retirement at age 41, he took his net worth from $40,000 to $1,000,000 in just ten years. (Seriously, where do I sign up?)


Of course, if you’re looking for a more lighthearted read, pick up The Girl’s Guide to Money Etiquette by Julianne Pekarthy and Heidi Farr. Jam-packed with hilarious anecdotes of when money and personal relationships collide, this money etiquette guide is sure to keep you advised and entertained.

So before you go into panic mode, pick up one of these great books and educate yourself!

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2 Comments

  1. H.G. GAROFALO

    Spurred on by anger at the Wall Street Bailout legislation, I’ve just finished my illustrated Fable about our messed-up monetary system (I used a Pen Name… this little book might actually anger some people).

    http://www.lulu.com/content/4373622

    I’ve studied this topic (banking, fiat currency, inflation, debt, and the Federal Reserve) for years, and I hope I’ve come up with a symbolic tale which explains the way our system of banking first originated from Warehouse Banking, and gradually developed into the legalized counterfeiting they like to call “Fractional Reserve Lending” today.

    This book can be used as a combination Coloring Book and Illustrated “fable” to teach children (and their significant adults) about the banking system and the dangers of credit and inflation… much like “Animal Farm” or an Aesop’s fable teaches principles of politics or human motivation.

    I think the time is ripe for this… maybe the public will like this book. The pages and illustrations are large so that kids can color them and have fun with their parents while learning… but I really wanted to boil it down to an understandable parable for adults who have difficulty sorting it all out.

    Thanks for taking a peek – all comments are most welcome and appreciated.

  2. Cary

    Hi H.G.,

    Thanks so much for sharing your book with us!

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