How To

7 Questions to Ask When Converting Your Blog to a Print Book

After writing a teblog to bookchnology blog for a UK-based magazine for about three years and notching up hundreds of blog entries, I approached the magazine editor and suggested this interesting collection of articles was worthy of a book.

He immediately began asking questions, including, “Why on earth might anyone be interested in a series of blog posts collected together into a book?” He was also concerned about the complexities of publishing, but having already published with Lulu, I knew this was the least of our worries – I published the book in 2009.

Can anyone turn his or her blog into a book?

In theory yes, but there are some questions worth considering before you initiate that big WordPress download.

Is there an audience for the book?

You don’t need to do a lot of market research on this. You can publish with Lulu even if you anticipate a limited or specialized audience.

How much effort is required?

If you are doing this because you want to see your name on the spine of a book, you should consider that selecting your best posts and formatting them for the printed page will be quite a bit of work.

Will your blog work as a book?

The blog I converted to book format was mainly journalism and commentary, so I could easily imagine it on the printed page. On the other hand, turning your years of Tumblr posts into a book may be a futile exercise – and may even infringe copyright unless you personally own every image you shared. Remember, your posts may work well in the context of a blog where you might feature video clips, Instagram photos and other media that looks great when viewed on an iPad, but is not going to translate to the printed page.

Are the blog posts relevant now and in the future?

Blog content almost always features a date-stamp, which can translate to book content in an epistolary format – dated blogs in sequence – but there is an important time distinction between blogs and books.

Blogs are written and published in the now, usually referencing the exact time they were written. As time goes on, new posts may update or supersede earlier ones. As such, some of your blog entries will be completely unsuitable for use in a book because they are comments on a moment, rather than less time-bound thoughts or comments.

A book needs to be planned with a much longer shelf life than an individual blog post. When you publish a book, it is published at a moment in time and cannot be quickly updated except through new editions. In general, book content needs to be planned so that it will not become quickly dated.

Will the structure of my blog translate to a book?

It is worth viewing your blog in the round. You may have a hundred thousand words of great content, but you may end up stripping away half of that content to preserve your best posts. It is worth thinking about whether you want a literal version of your blogs in book format or whether you can do more with the text when planning how it might be read on the page. For example, you may be able to connect several blogs together and present them as longer essays.

Why should I do it?

If you are already blogging then you are a writer. Many writers have used short publications that were eventually collected together into a longer book format – The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens is one of the most famous examples. In fact, there is little to distinguish the way Dickens wrote then from a blogger today who releases short articles then collects them together into a longer book.

Posterity is as good a reason as any to take a close look at your blog to see if it might be worth publishing as a book. Even if your blog posts are individual and cannot be collected together into a coherent story, there may still be value in collecting them together. In my case, my articles from 2006-2009 that went into my “book-of-the-blog” have now been deleted from the magazine website. Now my book is the only place where they continue to live!

Mark Hillary

Author BIO

Mark Hillary is a British author, blogger and advisor on technology and globalization based in São Paulo, Brazil. He is a regular contributor to journals including The Huffington Post, Reuters, The Guardian, and Computer Weekly.

Mark live-blogged the 2010 UK General Election for Reuters. He was an official blogger at the 2012 London Olympics. He was shortlisted as blogger of the year in 2009 and 2011 by Computer Weekly magazine.

Contact Mark: www.markhillary.com (@markhillary)

Mark on Lulu: http://j.mp/lulumarkhillary

Facebook CEO resolves to read 26 books in 2015

Could yours be one of them?

 

Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Facebook, is known for his ambitious New Year’s resolutions. Last year he learned to speak Mandarin. In past years he became a vegetarian (except for animals he killed himself), made an effort to meet a new person everyday (who was not a Facebook employee), wrote a thank you note everyday, and wore a tie every day (well, this one isn’t as extraordinary).

This year’s resolution, announced on January 2nd, is as equally impressive. “My challenge for 2015 is to read a new book every other week — with an emphasis on learning about different cultures, beliefs, histories and technologies”

He is also challenging all Facebook users who like his A Year of Books page to read the same books in the same time period. The page invites everyone to “read a new book every two weeks and discuss it here…. Suggestions for new books to read are always welcome.”

As of this writing, A Year of Books has received over 225,000 likes and Amazon announced that the first title to be read, The End of Power by Moisés Naím has already sold out. Lucky for us, print-on-demand books never sell out!

We are encouraging all Lulu.com non-fiction authors who specialize in cultural writing, belief systems, history, or technology, to tell Mr. Zuckerberg about your book.

It’s easy to do

  • Visit the Facebook page, A Year of Books and click the Like button to join the group.
  • Pitch your book on the page. Tell Mr. Zuckerberg how your book will help him learn about different cultures, beliefs, histories and technologies. Think of this as your 30-second elevator speech and don’t forget to include a link to your book to make it easy to find.
  • Tell your fans, friends and family that you’ve nominated your book to be read so they can like your post.
  • And, finally be sure to let us know you submitted your book for consideration. Simply tag us in your pitch by including Lulu.com in the post or using the hashtag #Lulu.

We wish you the best of luck and hope to see your book on Mr. Zuckerberg’s 2015 reading list.

Our First Reddit AMA

All right, Reddit, we admit it, we have been lurking you longer than we should have.

First you wooed us with memes, viral videos and funny pictures of cats. Then we realized that Reddit has real depth and grit. The front page of the internet has every relevant news article, opinion paper and helpful how-to for whatever your passion is. And you know what? That’s something we can get behind.

Since /r/books became one of the default subreddits you are set up with during account creation, we like to think there’s been a resurgence of interest in what we do best: the printed word. Over three million people subscribe to talk about books they have read, ones they want to read and to exchange ideas on what it really means to be a writer. However, just because /r/books is popular doesn’t mean that’s where our authors go for inspiration.

That’s why we’ve decided to land on /r/selfpublish for Lulu.com’s first-ever AMA. We want to reach out to authors who are doing it on their own, because we know the process is insane and exhausting, but ultimately fulfilling. On December 9, we will be answering your questions about the self-publishing process, how books are made, what “print on demand” really means and so much more.

Hosted by Lulu.com’s global fulfillment team, we will have the entire company at our disposal to get at the nitty gritty details of your roadblocks, the tools you’re missing and the areas where you may need clarification to feel confident in publishing your work.

As a special treat, we will have a coupon code for anyone who comes to participate or even just observe and follow the Q&A session.

At Lulu.com, we believe in authors creating what they love. Let us help you along the way to success as a self-published author. We look forward to your questions!

Email Marketing 101: Making the Most of Seasonal Sales

Let’s try out a few seasonal metaphors for your email marketing efforts…

Stuff your readers’ stockings with email! Deck the halls with deals on eBooks! Pass the turkey and mashed potatoes… and… strategically develop an email marketing plan that takes advantage of Lulu.com’s sales and special offers…

Okay, so that last one doesn’t really flow. But – it’s good advice all the same. Email marketing that coincides with Lulu’s impressive special offers is the next best thing to having your books carried right down your readers’ chimneys.

What’s so great about it? For starters, email marketing works. Social media may seem the savvier approach, but email is roughly six times more effective at bringing in new buyers than Facebook and Twitter. Email gives you a great platform for sharing special offers and introducing new books, without your carefully crafted content getting lost in the endless scroll of tweets and status updates.

And it’s simple. We were recently inspired to share a template with you based on an email from one of our authors to his reader base. So, you can take what’s below based on an offer we currently have running – and be sure to get the email out soon.

 

Email Subject Line: Get <Book Title> for 35% Off

Email Body:

Have you ordered a printed copy of <book title> yet? <Placeholder for one line description of title> If you haven’t placed your order already, then today is the day to do it.

Until December 3, you can save 35% by checking out with code WQT32 on Lulu.com. Simply visit the link: <Placeholder for link to book>, add it to your cart and apply the code at checkout to have your discount applied.

Plus, you can grab copies at a great deal to share with friends and family.

Grab a copy today! <Link to book>

<Author name>

 

See? Simple. You can highlight the current savings, briefly describe the book, and gives easy instructions. It’s low-pressure, good-natured, informative and brief. You can even provide a link right to your Author Spotlight and save your readers from searching.

And, though we are currently entering the season of sharing and shopping, this strategy works year-round. At Lulu.com, we’re always looking for ways to promote you and sell your books. Whenever we have a sale — seasonal or otherwise — send out an email blast letting everyone know. After all, ‘tis always the season for reading!

Expand Your Distribution and Reach More Readers

At Lulu.com, we want to give every author the tools they need to have a chance at success. After all, there’s a lot to do with your self-published book between editing it, formatting it and designing the perfect cover. That doesn’t even include writing it! But there’s one aspect you might not have given a lot of thought to yet: how exactly are you going to sell your book?

Selling on Lulu.com is a great start, but to reach the largest pool of potential readers you need to be in the most stores possible – that means Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com and more. Luckily, Lulu.com’s globalREACH distribution service lists your book on websites around the world in a few quick steps.

So why should your book have globalREACH? Well, there’s no reason not to get it! Worried that it’ll take too much time and effort on your part to get everything set-up? Think again – it couldn’t be any easier.

NaNoWriMo 2014 Kicks Off: Tips for Success

It’s late. Your heart-rate is elevated. The coffee is still percolating. Your hair, unwashed, is now reaching skyward as you tug on it almost every minute. You look over at your wall calendar, but you don’t need to be told what month it is: it is November. It is National Novel Writing Month. 

Started in 1999 by Chris Baty and “20 other overcaffeinated yahoos,” the write-50,000-words-of-a-novel-in-a-month challenge started with 21 participants and 6 winners. In 15 years it’s grown exponentially. Last year, over 310,000 writers attempted the feat.

The word count threshold, 50,000 words, means that a writer must commit to writing just a little under 2,000 words a day, or, to us writers, A LOT OF STINKIN’ WORDS. While some established authors take months or years to craft a narrative, writers participating in National Novel Writing Month (or NaNoWriMo), have just one month to commit to a draft. Several best-sellers have emerged from NaNoWriMo including Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen, and The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern.

We could not be more excited to be sponsoring NaNoWriMo again this year and hope everyone will take advantage of our 2014 Wrimo offerings. We also totally understand that finding the time and creative energy for this 30-day challenge is a huge feat, so here are a few ways to make the words flow!

Top 3 Ways to Ensure Self-Publishing Success

Yes you canContributed by Dan Dillon, Lulu Director of Product Marketing

I recently had the pleasure to co-present a webinar with Bowker on Self-Publishing: Your Path to Success. Ralph Coviello, publisher relations manager at Bowker, shared copious insights into how the self-publishing landscape has taken shape over the past few years, as well as how it may continue to evolve. From all the great observations and advice, I’ve distilled the three most important lessons to be gleaned for your success in self-publishing.

1. Publish in multiple formats
It stands to reason that the more products you have to sell, the more money you’re able to make. Books are no exception. Authors who offer multiple formats of their books sell up to four times more than authors who offer their readers only a single format. To capitalize on this, make your titles available as a softcover, hardcover and an ebook. Readers across all age groups are reading print, so there’s no predicting what format individual book buyers may prefer. have ready whatever they may want.

2. Channel surf
Just as it stands to reason that the more products you have to offer, the more you’re likely to sell – the more places you make them available, the more you’ll be able to sell. Get your books into as many online retail channels as possible. The ones that will likely have the greatest impact on your print book sales are Amazon and Barnes & Noble. For ebooks, you’ll want to make your titles available on the Kindle, iBookstore, NOOK and Kobo, at a minimum. Happily, you can get all of your books into these channels — and many more — with Lulu.com. For free.

3. Press releases are very popular
This is a double-edged sword. Yes, press releases are a valuable tool for building awareness about your book, and you can reach the same journalists who the Big 6 publishers talk to. Yes, there is a ton of news out in the world and it takes a lot to get your story heard. The lesson here? Targeting the information in your press release is critical, and targeting the people you send it to is also key.

View the complete webinar, and let us know in the comments what’s worked for you to drive book sales. You can also page through the webinar deck on Slideshare.