Articles tagged "author bio"

Be Our Guest (Blogger)

Be Our Guest

 

You need a platform – we have that.
You want to reach a wider audience – we have that, too.
You have a story to tell – so tell it.

Lulu is throwing caution to the wind and inviting our authors to become Lulu bloggers. After all, who knows more about self-publishing than self-published authors? You get to share your knowledge with a broader audience while promoting your work. We get to show the world that Lulu authors are among the best writers on the web.

Send your story pitch to PR@lulu.com. Your pitch should include:

  • An introduction: Who are you?
  • Relevance: How does your proposal fit with our existing audience?
  • Topics: What do you propose to write about?
  • Value: What benefit will readers get from the article?

Your pitch should not be a bulleted list, nor should it be an epic love poem in long form. This is the one piece of your writing we are guaranteed to read, so keep it brief, to the point, and grammatically correct.  For more information on writing an effective pitch, see: Pitch Perfect: Pitching a Guest Post.

Here are some ideas for articles, but don’t be limited by what you see here. Originality will be rewarded.

What do you know? What have you learned? What would you tell a new author? What should an author avoid? How do you feel when your words arrive in the mail as a book? What new technologies help you stay organized? How do you research your characters and locales? What do people say when they recognize themselves in your book? How many times do you write, rewrite and rewrite again? Got any funny stories? How do you effectively edit your own writing? How do you find trustworthy publishing services? Whose dreams are you making come true?

You can be assured that all pitches will be read and responded to by our team.

We look forward to hearing your ideas and working with you to expand your audience.

Guest Posting Guidelines

Marketing a Professional, Technical, or Academic Book

A majority of the blog posts thus far have been more geared toward authors publishing work for the general fiction reader. But what if you’ve written an academic, professional, or technical book that doesn’t have the far-reaching market of a novel? Should you follow the marketing guidelines put forth thus far?

Well, yes and no.

Building a community through social media is important no matter who you’re writing for. However, there are certain aspects niche marketers need to pay more attention to, such as:

Planning your book’s release: Trade books can be released at any point of the year because there is always a willing market of readers. Professional, academic, and technical books are another story altogether. You wouldn’t release a manual for the iPhone4S a month before the iPhone5 is scheduled to come out, nor would you release an SAT guide in May, right after a majority of high school juniors in the country have taken the test. So, before you decide on a release date, research sales spikes for your topic to determine the best season and month for publication.

Finding your niche: This should be a goal for all writers, but it’s especially important for those who write about more obscure or challenging concepts. The good news is that, given the narrow breadth of your topic, you have a smaller community to break into — and thus more of a chance of being noticed. So even before you finish your book,

How to write a successful author bio

Quick, look at your back cover. If there’s a big blank space there, you probably need to write your author biography.  This is not the time to be shy; your author biography, while only a few sentences long, can have a huge impact on the success of your book and you as an author.

CONTENT:

Consider your audience; what do your readers want to know? Keep your information relevant to the book’s subject and your audience.  If you’re writing children’s books, leave out the fact that you started your own tax firm at age 19, and vice versa; if your books are about preparing your own small-business taxes, don’t mention that your two Shih-tzus are named Jingles and Meriwether.

Elements to include:

  • Education. Where did you get your advanced degree(s)? If you don’t have a lot of other career or writing experience, name-dropping your university helps show qualification.
  • Experience with the subject. Tell us how you became an expert, or how you’ve recently used your expertise.
  • Previous publications/writing experience. Were you published in the New York Times? Fantastic! If this is your first book, you might mention it briefly, but only if you have room after all of your more important information. Otherwise, you can simply state what you are in vague terms: novelist, writer, poet, etc.
  • Other ways to find you. Do you blog? Have a podcast? Write regular articles for a popular site? Include other ways for readers to find your work or contact you directly, if you wish.
  • Continue Reading »

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