Articles tagged "children’s book"

Why children should be writing stories

We couldn’t agree more with Gail E. Tompkins. As a professor of literacy and early education at California State University and author of numerous books touting the benefits of learning composition skills from an early age, Prof. Tompkins has consistently acknowledged the importance creative writing carries in early childhood education.Screen Shot 2014-08-05 at 2.06.23 PM

Prof. Tompkins outlines seven unique reasons why children should write stories. These are:

  1. to provide entertainment for the child and others
  2. to foster artistic expression
  3. to explore functions and values of writing
  4. to stimulate imagination
  5. to clarify thinking processes
  6. to search for and identify the child’s identity
  7. to improve reading and writing skills

Well documented as pillars of early education, these seven benefits greatly affect how children learn, express themselves and think critically later in their development.

We’re big fans of Prof. Tompkins’ work at Lulu Jr. as we continue to work toward our mission to inspire creativity, strengthen literacy skills and build self-esteem among children with Lulu Jr.’s Education Programs. Our free book-publishing programs support writing and language arts curriculum through project based learning, communication and collaboration.

Lulu Jr.’s Storybook and Classbook programs allow teachers to meet the needs of the classroom while inviting students express creativity through their own writing and illustrations.

We love being a part of early education and sharing the findings and research from established educators like Prof. Tompkins. We hope you’ll take the time to explore Lulu Jr.’s Education Programs by visiting http://www.lulujr.com/teachers.php.

Critterkin is activating young readers in a whole new way

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Jena Ball, author of the children’s CritterKin Book Series, is taking the way kids read and interact with her stories and characters to a whole new level. As part of the “CritterKin Be Kind” project, Ball has been working with 43 third graders from Bellevue Elementary School’s summer reading program, not only fostering literacy in children, but also imagination by taking her books and turning the themes into a tangible expressions of kindness called the “CritterKin Kindness Quilt.”

During the three week program, Ball has helped these children to experience, learn about, and use kindness. Not only did the kids have read an entire book, they also created three versions of a ”CritterKin Kindness Quilt” (paper, fabric and digital) while blogging and writing poetry about their adventures, as well. In a grand finale today, the children will be performing the last chapter of the book as a play . The play will be open not only to the  local Bellevue, Nebraska community, but to the entire world as well. Since technology has played a huge roll in the project, the play will actually be mass broadcast for anyone to tune into on a custom Google Hangout.

We sincerely applaud all of the effort that has gone into this initiative and hope that you will consider joining for what promises to be a wonderful, giggle filled celebration of 43 terrific kids and  their work:

WHEN: Friday, June 20th at 1:30 pm (CST)
Google Hangout: Visit this Google+ Page for the link: https://plus.google.com/events/chst5ksdn7b5iv1rn6eb3be21to

To learn more about the book, Lead With Your Heart,  that inspired the program and the play, please visit the CritterKin books page: http://wp.me/P37dkL-kp-0p

To see how you can start your own “CritterKin Be Kind” project, visit the CritterKin “Be Kind” page: http://wp.me/P37dkL-bO

#WeNeedDiverseBooks: Join the conversation

Screen Shot 2014-05-06 at 1.06.37 PMRecently a group of authors launched a social media campaign to raise awareness around the significant lack of diversity in children’s literature. These authors, including Ellen Oh, Aisha Saeed and Chelsea Pitcher, hope to bring this issue to the forefront of people’s minds.

To put it plainly, we couldn’t agree more. There is a true need for diversity in the books we read to our children. As they learn and grow, exposing young minds to the vast and varied cultures across the world will help foster respect and recognition in the value each of our beliefs and customs offers. It is up to all of us as independent authors and storytellers to share our experiences with the world as a way of exposing others to our cultures.

So far, we have fallen short of achieving this goal. A 2012 report conducted by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that only 3.3 percent of children’s books published in the previous year were about African-Americans, 2.1 percent were about Asian-Pacific Americans, 1.5 percent were about Latinos and a mere 0.6 percent were about American Indians.

Clearly, there is a true call for us to take action and write. As Johannes Neur perfectly captured in her blog post for the NY Public Library, “literature has the power to instantiate universal human truths through stories told around the globe, across gender lines, and from varying religious perspectives.” Think of Maya Angelou, Alice Walker, and – one of my personal favorites – Zora Neale Hurston. They all had beautiful and powerful stories to tell and with each one, they opened our eyes to a world we may have otherwise never known. At times their books would make us smile, while at others we’d share the pain and emotions of the characters they created.

The We Need Diverse Books Campaign began last week with a plea to the public to visit the project website where they are asking readers to take a photo holding a sign that says “We need diverse books because …”. Check out the submissions so far, and we encourage you to join the conversation and use your networks to bring awareness to this movement. Simply tweet your support using the hashtag #WeNeedDiverseBooks. You can also follow @diversebooks for ongoing updates.

It is our duty to celebrate this diversity so that the next generation can see themselves in their books and develop their own self worth and love of literature. Share your stories however you are able. If you need a platform for your voice or a little help along the way, we are here to support you.

Start writing and share your experiences and culture. Tweet us to let us know you’re helping us make a difference or post a picture of yourself with your book (or your favorite) to show the rich diversity among independent authors.

Creativity Strikes! Interview with Children’s Writer Sandra Arthur

As the social media manager here at Lulu, I have the lucky task of monitoring our Facebook Page. I can’t tell you what a delight it is to communicate directly with so many of our authors and to get a chance to see the creative ways you all have to reach your readers. I’m constantly impressed. The other day I saw a post from an author named Sandra Arthur and wanted to share with you about an ingenious workshop she created to get kids excited about reading and to teach them about endangered orangutans and the rainforest of Borneo. She kindly agreed to an interview (shown below), so I hope you will enjoy getting to read a bit about one of your fellow Lulu authors.

Can you please share a few words about the Jungle Workshop you organized?

I ran a “Jungle Workshop” to provide a fun storytelling experience for children. I was lucky to get support from a local, independent bookshop/café/toy shop. I created a Rainforest Room with a tent and decorations.

Focus: Illustrated Books

Whenever I talk to someone about Lulu, they’re normally surprised to learn that Lulu lets you publish just about anything – not just black and white, text-based books, but full-color photo books, cookbooks, and calendars too.  I especially love the expression on people’s faces when I explain that Lulu can even help make a book with beautiful, vibrant illustrations too.  In fact, hundreds of authors and artists have created and sold their graphic novels, children’s books and art collections on Lulu.  Below are just a few of my favorites.

Through Tiger’s Eyes

Written by Judy Kamilhor with Illustrations by Edward B. Snyder

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Available in both hardcover and paperback, this  is hands down one of the most beautifully crafted I have ever come across on Lulu.

What does Tiger see as he walks through the forest? In this delightful blend of dazzling color and gentle poetry, children learn how to observe the world around them. Artist Edward B. Snyder and poet Judy Kamilhor have created a captivating book filled with color, personality, and love.

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Zombies Hate Stuff

By Greg Stones

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I keep a copy of this book on my coffee table because it is funny, cute, original, and illustrated very well.

The product description for this book says it all:  “An illustrated list of things that zombies hate.”  Artist Greg Stones takes us on a page by page guide through all the things zombies apparently don’t care for.  Each page is accompanied by a humorous illustration that  will surprise and delight you as you think to yourself:  “yeah, I could see why they’d hate that.”  And just for the record, my favorite is “balloons.


Peter & Company

By Jon Ponikvar

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A collection of strips and pages from the online comic strip by Jon Ponikvar. The book includes 75 strips in their original grayscale tones, 25 comic pages in full color, and a book-exclusive color comic detailing the events leading up to the online comic.

This collection is very well put together and is available in hardback, paperback, or as a download.  The illustrations are clean and sharp, and I particularly enjoy the illustrated introduction of the characters.  The strips follow the misadventures of Peter, a 12-year-old boy that faces daily issues, we can all relate to.