Articles tagged "e-readers"

eBooks: A Home for Long-Form Journalism

Have you heard the phrase ‘eBook singles’? If not, this refers to short pieces of fiction or journalism that are sold for less than five dollars. The success of eBook singles has paved the way for bigger players to get involved. Last week The New York Times released its first eBook Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek, which is a long-form, reported piece about a group of skiers trapped after an avalanche in Washington State.

The eBook itself contains original material that wasn’t included in the newspaper version of the piece, and uses several new techniques that enhance news reporting. Seeing a reputable periodical like The New York Times embrace eBooks is a testament to the value of the format. For years there has been talk that journalism is at a crossroads and that newspaper reporters are in a race to the bottom – getting paid less for stories that have a dwindling readership. But, what we see happening here is simply indicative of a change in both format and pay-schemes.

Journalists and media outlets, by taking advantage of eBooks, are entering a voracious reading market. When people buy e-readers, they read more, and they’re able to read a wider variety of content. E-readers can provide an outlet for long-form journalism pieces that are too long to fit in the layout of a printed newspaper, but too short to publish as standalone books. As readers and writers, we welcome the return of long, thoughtful, journalistic writing. Cheers!

The Upward eBook Trend

According to a recent MediaBistro article, “net sales revenue from eBooks have surpassed hardcover books in the first quarter of 2012.” The data comes from the March Association of American Publishers (AAP) net sales revenue report. I think that this was always expected, but it’s still indicative of a paradigm shift in book sales: It is now more popular to download a book than to pick up a hardcover copy at your local bookstore or order one shipped to your door.

While trade paperbacks still lead the industry in sales, it does seem inevitable that at some point, eBooks will make up the vast majority of book sales while physical books will fill a niche role. One of the main drivers of this surge in eBooks is the fact that people with e-readers just read more books. A Pew study, released in April of this year, found that “the average reader of eBooks says she has read 24 books (the mean number) in the past 12 months, compared with an average of 15 books by a non-eBook consumer.”