Articles tagged "eBook"

Turning Your Blog Into Your eBook

One of the most frustrating truths of running a website is the ascendancy of new content. No matter how you lay out your website, more often than not, new content will take center stage, relegating older content to the recesses of your website, only reappearing when someone happens upon it through an internet search. It’s sad to see such good material get buried, and is clearly a limitation of the blog format.

But the blog isn’t the end of content, by any means. To get more mileage out of their content, bloggers have begun turning their webpages into eBooks. By turning old content into new profit, they also give some pieces that might deserve another look the chance to get one. This tactic helps bloggers advance their brand and provide offline consumption of their writing. Not only that, but bloggers already have access to a targeted audience (their site visitors) which makes publishing an eBook that much more viable. Besides the ever-present Tumblr-books (think cats doing funny things), some successful books have started out as blogs, including the basis for the film Julie & Julia.

EBooks also give a website the chance to showcase work around a specific theme or topic. If you run a cooking website, it might make sense to publish an eBook around Halloween that presents recipes for candy or other sweets. Or if you run a political website, an eBook that comes out highlighting your best writing about the upcoming election might also be a smart idea.

EBooks push the pause button on the lighting fast internet, and allow for reading to be more reflective and not reactive. Revisiting pieces before publishing them in an eBook, with updates of course, compels readers to get the eBook, and not just find the pieces on the blog itself. An eBook can also be a better way to engage contributors to the blog, who will see their writing published across multiple mediums, instead of flaming out quickly on the front page.

Turning a blog into an eBook gives old material new life, helps disseminate your content farther, and gives it an even better chance of earning money. What does a blogger have to lose?

Ready to start you own eBook?

How To: Serialize with Lulu

There was such great response from Lulu authors at our blog post about a resurgence of interest in novel serialization, that we thought it would be helpful to talk about…

What’s the best way to make a serial novel with Lulu?

EBooks are really the way to go with serialized material, and the most important reason is length. Sizing options for print books require 32-page minimums for the best results. Don’t get us wrong, Lulu print books are a great way to compile and release your whole, finished novel at the end of the serial novel process, but most of us can’t write 32-page chapters on a regular basis. The short length of a single chapter of a novel is much more suited to a Lulu eBook. In order to harken back to the golden age of serialization, when a reader could sit down with the newspaper and read the latest installment of a Dickens epic after current events, you’re going to need a Lulu eBook. Don’t forget that Lulu will turn your .doc, .docx, .rtf, and .odt files into an EPUB eBook file for free, and provides retail distribution.

EBooks are also less of an initial investment for the author, of both time and money, and that matches the low initial investment that comes with serialized novels. Think of eBooks as a chance to test the waters with whatever project or concept you just haven’t been able to get out of your head but you’re not sure will work on a large scale. You can write one chapter, and see if readers are engaged and excited about it. If you release Chapter One and decide, based on reader feedback, that your hero needs a sidekick, guess who you’ll be able to introduce in Chapter Two? You guessed it, the pun-hurling partner in crime of your terse heroine.

Whether you decide to go with print or electronic publication (hey, if you crank out chapters Dickensian in length, more power to you!), there are some things you’ll want to consider for your personal writing process, and some of the decisions you make after you finish an installment.

The Nexus 7: Good News for EPUB Formatted eBooks

The new Google Nexus 7 tablet is making headlines as the “Kindle Killer.”  Early adopters of the device are reporting that the Nexus 7 can open EPUB formatted eBooks, which you can create right here on Lulu, as well as make use of all the e-reader apps in the Google play store.

Folks are even saying they can just upload all their EPUBs to a Dropbox folder and easily access their entire digital library directly from the cloud.  Looks like Lulu customers just got one more device they can enjoy their open-published EPUB titles on.
Some reviewers are stating that the Nexus 7 beats the Kindle Fire on specs and features.  Determine which device is best for your e-reading needs by checking out these sources:

eBooks, a Two-way Street?

Looking for the future of eBooks? It’s in the clouds! Err, well, it’s in the cloud. Cloud-based computing services let you access all sorts of data – from your address book to your music collection – remotely, via an increasing range of devices, from laptops to cellphones to, you guessed it, eReaders.

So far, cloud-based computing has made huge strides in helping you shuffle your data between the various gadgets you use throughout your day. Apple’s iCloud, for example, let’s me download the latest episode of Breaking Bad on my laptop, watch the first half on my phone during the trip to work, and voila, there it is on my TV when I get home.

Lately, we’ve seen lending capabilities pop up on the Kindle, and publishers like Tor Books are doing away with DRM to encourage sharing between eBook readers, but it sounds like this is just the beginning. Earlier this week, Democrasoft, Inc. and VOOK ePublishing announced an eBook with an exciting new feature: two-way interactivity. According to Digital Book World, the book, 11 Days in May, published by Waterfront Press, will allow “real-time author and reader-to-reader dialog and collaboration from inside [the] e-book.”

In other words, you’ll be able to comment, ask questions, and respond to the questions of others without taking your eyes off the page or flipping between applications. Exciting stuff! And then there’s the authorial angle. This technology, which will allow multiple readers to access the same digital book simultaneously, could really expand the reading experience and lead to a whole new dimension of an author’s engagement with the public.

It’s an exciting time for the eBook. A lot of the news we’re hearing these days is less focused on how digital publishing stacks up against traditional publishing, and more more concerned with the format coming into its own, taking advantage of social media, internet marketing, and developments like the cloud. Increased interactivity is a fascinating prospect, but is it a revolution or a gimmick? Should authors working with the format feel compelled to engage in a digital back-and-forth with their readers, or will this role be taken up by a select few? Time will tell, but I’d love to hear people sound off in the comments.

The Word on Used eBooks

You walk around the old marketplace, through antique stores and old stacks of records, looking, hopefully, for that one store where you’ll be able to enter entirely new worlds. Yes, you’ve found it! The used eBookstore.

Used eBooks? As outrageous as that sounds, if a new ruling by the Court of Justice of the European Union is followed by similar rulings, a used eBook could soon be coming your way. Of course, that all depends on how eBook publishers deal with this paradigm.

When you buy an eBook, you buy the license to use that file. The ruling declares that you have the right to resell that license to a third party, but only if you cease to use that file (and not make duplicates of it). Whether eBooks will now come with the ability to be resold, or if new software will create a whole market of secondhand books, remains to be seen. But if this ruling gains traction, it appears that publishers will at least have to make this option available. Or not — it’s also quite possible that a publisher would slap on a “no resale” protection to their eBooks.

As a writer, does it make sense to allow your eBook to be resold? You don’t make any money on a resale (at least not traditional ones), and it’s possible your eBook could just be traded around until it’s sold for mere pennies. Still, it never seemed like used bookstores were to be the downfall of the publishing industry in the pre-digital days.

However, Digital Book World paints a very positive picture of this new development:

“If eBooks could be easily resold by readers, the effects on the growing e-book industry would be great. Used eBookstores could pop up; new, exotic forms of digital rights management (DRM) software could be developed; and the price of eBooks, facing upward pressure from their new-found resale value and downward pressure from a used book market, could change.”

Do you think the idea of a used eBook is a good one? As a writer, will you offer the option for used copies of your eBook to be resold? Is this a good alternative to piracy?

Disputes over eBook pricing models… what do they all mean?

The eBook pricing war rages on, with such heavy-hitters as the Department of Justice, Amazon, Apple, and the majority of major publishers continuing to tussle over the price of eBooks.

To recap: Amazon has been selling eBooks at a loss for some time, in order to increase sales of their Kindle e-reader. Apple, looking to take some of the eBook business away from Amazon, then offered a higher pricing model to the major publishers, one which would keep them in business through the change of book formats. The Department of Justice, urged on by Amazon, filed suit against the major publishers claiming that they worked together to fix prices artificially high. The DOJ charged that this collusion is a breach of Federal Antitrust laws. After the suit was filed, a handful of publishers settled. Still, this is far from over.

The Consumer Federation of America, an association of nearly 300 nonprofit consumer groups, released a statement claiming that, “Books are being devalued, literature is not.”

By restoring competitive pricing to the market (a race to the bottom for eBook prices) the consumer obviously wins. But at what cost? Surely the major publishers cannot continue peddling a product they can’t make a profit off of.

Pre-Publication Marketing Timeline for Authors

On Lulu’s blog there’s been a lot of talk about the “how” of marketing (Pinterest, Blogging, Twitter, writing a press release, video chat, etc.) but little focus on the “when,” which is an equally important component of a successful book marketing campaign.

Here are some general guidelines you can follow compiled in a simple marketing timeline to help you plan:

10–12 weeks out: Do your research. Find appropriate blogs and media outlets that might want to review your book and compile a list of media contacts. Come up with a list of friends who can help spread the announcement of your publication and ask each one personally for support. When you reach out to contacts, offer them a free copy of your book and ask for pre-publication quotes to be used in your book’s detail page at various online retailers.

*Expert tip: Make the first chapter of your book available for free for anyone who might want to review your book or include it in a news article. You can do this by creating a free eBook on Lulu.com that includes just the first chapter of your book as well as contact details for press inquiries.

8–10 weeks out: Draft your press release and any announcement emails you’re planning on sending out.

Stephen King Publishes Joyland in Print-Only

One of the most financially successful authors in history, Stephen King, decided to make his new book, Joyland, available in print onlyJoyland, which is a throwback to the pulp novels of mid-century, will have to be read on a page rather than on a screen.

In a press release, King said, “I loved the paperbacks I grew up with as a kid, and for that reason, we’re going to hold off on e-publishing this one for the time being. Joyland will be coming out in paperback, and folks who want to read it will have to buy the actual book.”

By confirming his decision as an aesthetic one, King has made the decision that reading the book as an actual paperback is key to his vision. Authors often take liberties with presentation of their work, some maximizing experimentation, while others don’t even bother to have chapter breaks.

Book Expo America 2012: Three Authors and 36 Million Reasons to Meet Them

Lulu is headed to Book Expo America (BEA), one of the largest publishing events in the world, next week, but we’re not going alone.  Three of our very own authors will be on site June 5th – 7th signing free copies of their bestsellers and, more importantly, sharing tips on how to make it in this lucrative new world of open-publishing.

The line-up of bestselling authors at BEA includes New York Times Bestseller David Thorne, former congressional candidate and political author Kevin Powell, and marketing/tech guru Scott Steinberg. This is a can’t miss for everyone attending BEA, so stop by to see us at book #3476!

Lulu Founder and CEO, Bob Young, will also be there presenting on two panels Sunday, June 3rd.  Bob will be calling on his years of salesmanship and expertise to share valuable tips and insights for publishing success.  Both panels take place this Sunday at the Javits Convention Center in New York.  Bob’s speaking schedule below:

  • 9:00AM – 9:50AM – Room 1E14 – Break Through & Publish You
  • 1:30PM – 2:20PM – Room 1E13 – Publishing Partners That Put Unknown Authors on the Bookshelf
Lulu’s presence at BEA comes hot on the heels of our 10-year anniversary, which had us celebrating our authors making over $36 million in revenue in our decade-long history.  At over 677,000 published eBooks and over 618,000 published print titles, we’re more excited than ever to show the folks at BEA just how easy it is to publish works in all sorts of markets and formats more profitably than ever before.  See you at the show!

How To Publish an eBook | Video

At Lulu, we are happy to provide tools for authors to publish to a variety of formats, including eBook format. There are many good reasons to publish your book to eBook format in addition to other formats such as paperback and hardcover. In order to help you publish your eBook, Lulu has created the following how-to guide. It is a step-by-step walk through of the process of how to publish an eBook on Lulu.com.

As an additional resource for authors creating eBooks, here is a guide to help your resolve the Top 10 Reasons Why Your eBook was Rejected.