Articles tagged "ebookstore"

Reselling eBooks raises questions for authors

Over the past week, debate has intensified over the practice of reselling eBooks. Amazon and Apple both filed patents last week to make reselling eBooks a reality, and the collective reaction by readers and book-buyers across the Internet was ambivalent. Of course, selling and buying used books has long been a practice in the publishing world, but eBooks provide a series of new issues that need to be resolved before the practice can become widespread.

When you would buy a physical version of a book, you would buy the rights to owning one copy of that book. It could be resold to whomever you chose, at whatever price, but at least there was only one copy of it. eBooks are a little more complicated with their ability to be copied as well as the multiple Digital Rights Management choices out there for authors. Every author’s worst nightmare is seeing their book go out there, become a hit, and everyone reading a pirated copy. Luckily, that hasn’t been the case so far for eBook readers. A lot of readers enjoy buying their books, which is good. But at what price do they want to pay for it?

If the book resells for a dime, wouldn’t it cut into the profit margins of the author, especially if it is being resold right next to the original full-priced eBook? Mark-downs are common for used copies of physical books, but that’s because they physically degrade. A “used” eBook would look just like the original one.

David Pogue over at The Times tries to sort through this complication — physical degradation of a book is necessary for its discount.  He goes through the patents filed by Amazon and Apple and doesn’t quite find a solution, but believes that publishers and writers will find a common-ground that allows for used eBooks to help writers make a living, while also making their work more available and affordable.

What do you think about the possibility of used eBooks? As writers, do you want their to be a secondhand marketplace?

Hiptype: Analytics for eBooks

I run a website, which means I constantly check Google Analytics to see which stories are being read and how readers are reaching my site. It’s an incredibly useful tool that helps me figure out my audience, what my readers enjoy, and when best to post certain pieces. This type of real-time analytics has been revolutionary for websites, letting media groups find out whether their tweets are making a difference, whether their “tags” are working, and if their highfaluting SEO strategy is working.

Of course, as an author, this might all be gibberish. That is about to change. Hiptype, a young start-up, is looking to bring the wonder of analytics to eBooks. While it’s still in Beta and not yet available to all publishing companies, Hiptype represents a new, inevitable approach to gauging the eBook market. By noting when readers make a comment on a section, or share an excerpt, authors and publishers can see what interests and excites readers.

This leads to some interesting dilemmas and the question of privacy on the internet. Many publishers, authors and marketers would like to use this technology to learn more about their readers. There are two ways to look at it: as an invasion of privacy or as a research tool designed to deliver you the most relevant content. Your internet-surfing experience can be tailored to you based on what your browser knows about you (what words you search, what websites you visit, etc.). With this information, advertisers can target specific ads to you based on your interests. For avid readers, this can mean that when you go searching for eBooks, the eBookstore will recommend books that people similar to you have enjoyed.

Likewise, authors and publishers can use this information to target a specific audience with an eBook and to improve marketing efforts. You can also use the information about your primary audience to create more relevant content for them. For instance, let’s say that you discover that your books are very popular with veterans. With this knowledge you may decide to include a character in your next book who is a veteran.

This is just another avenue of creative possibilities that has been opened by the internet. We imagine that this type of analytic eBook information will become ubiquitous in the coming years.

As writers, how will you use this information? Will you tailor your books to your audience? Are you interested in knowing who reads your books?

Independent eBookstores

Malaprops Independent Bookstore in Asheville, North Carolina

Malaprops Independent Bookstore in Asheville, North Carolina

It was only a matter of time: eBooks have gone indie. New, smaller websites are capitalizing on the success of eBooks by offering a boutique, curated experience which allows independent booksellers to promote less mainstream eBooks, including ones that have been self-published. By creating a culture around selected titles, indie eBookstores are acting like independent bookstores used to back in their heyday. With “staff picks,” events, and author interviews, these indie eBookstores are the future of a mediated and targeted book-buying experience.

One eBookstore, Emily Books, which bills itself as “An Indi(e) Bookstore,” has a subscription plan. It mails out recommended eBooks as well as entitles the subscriber “to exclusive events and priceless feelings of satisfaction, sophistication, and intellectual superiority.”

In an interview with The Billfold, co-founder Emily Gould  tells readers why they should look for eBooks from these emerging websites:

“If you buy a book from Emily Books, two genius ladies with great taste have not only okayed it, they’ve worked really hard to share it with you.”

Another indie ebookshop, OnlyIndie, allows independent authors to competitively price their works, as well as increase their returns as the book gains popularity.

So the personal touch has begun to be given to eBooks. As a writer, this is an incredibly good thing. It means the book culture that fawns over smaller books, ones without a large publisher behind them, can now begin to do the same with eBooks.

Booksellers don’t only play a role in making sure you get a book into your hands, they make sure you get the right book. That’s why independent bookstores have long fostered a community that prizes great books over ones with mass appeal.

As a Lulu author, it makes sense to reach out to these emerging indie ebookshops to see if they’re interested in offering your eBook. By not only having a bookseller, but a champion of your work, selling your book, you instantly expand your appeal and visibility. It’s apparent that in the coming years, more and more of these indie ebookstores will enter the market, and the author that knows how to tap into their energy will be one who not only finds a broader audience, but also an energized bookseller.