Articles tagged "entrepreneur"

Lulu Teams Up with NC State to Fund the World’s Next Big Ideas

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RALEIGH, NC – <Oct 4, 2016> – Lulu, the world’s leading independent publishing company, proudly announces a five-year extension of our partnership with North Carolina State University’s Entrepreneurship Initiative to fund the Lulu eGames through 2020.

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Entrepalooza kicks off another year of innovation at NCSU

“Lulu was founded by entrepreneur Bob Young to remove the barriers that prevented promising new authors from publishing and sharing their knowledge,” said Nigel Lee, Lulu CEO. “Our partnership with NC State is a natural extension of that mission. Who knows how these brilliant young minds, these knowledge entrepreneurs, will change the world when given the opportunity to share their ideas for new products and innovative solutions to real-world problems?”

Last year’s Lulu eGames competition awarded more than $60,000 in cash prizes across five different categories, including the Daugherty Endowment Challenge for companies who have licensed NC State intellectual property and the B Corp Champions Challenge for students building new ventures that use business as a force for social and environmental change. Past winners include Undercover Colors, a startup developing nail products that change color in the presence of date rape drugs; Bee Downtown, a venture that earned one of only four IDEO-backed global fellowships for climate innovators; and Trakex, a company whose founders were selected to participate in the competitive Y Combinator Fellowship program.

“The Lulu eGames provides participants with the opportunity to gain real-world experience in entrepreneurship; build invaluable relationships regionally, nationally and globally; and receive cash awards to help their ventures move forward in a real way,” said Dr. Tom Miller, Senior Vice Provost for Academic Outreach and Entrepreneurship and McPherson Family Distinguished Professor of Engineering Entrepreneurship at NC State. “It’s a pleasure to continue this partnership with Lulu, a company that shares NC State’s commitment to cultivating entrepreneurship because of the tremendous impact it has on our world.”

image1As the eGames sponsor, Lulu will work with teams to develop and present product pitches and written descriptions to more effectively tell their stories and share their ideas with the world. Through our participation, Lulu hopes to further increase awareness and visibility of the eGames.

When asked about Lulu’s continuing relationship with NC State, Lee responded, “Lulu has always been dedicated to making the world a better place, one story at a time. By continuing our sponsorship of the Lulu eGames, we will add to this legacy one innovative idea, one life-changing product, and one entrepreneur at a time.”

 

For more information

NC State Entrepreneurship Initiative, please visit: https://ei.ncsu.edu/

Lulu eGames, please visit: https://ei.ncsu.edu/egames/

Lulu Press, please visit: www.lulu.com

Lulu Receives B-Corporation Certification

Advice from a Wise Guy

Photo credit: @abennett96 on Flickr

Guy Kawasaki, one of the most prominent venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, as well as one of the original marketers of Apple, has struck out on his own and self-published a book (which fittingly enough, is about self-publishing). APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur explores the pitfalls and successes of self-publishing from the vantage of a Guy (sorry) who knows a thing or two about success in the digital age.

He’s recently compiled a list of “do’s and dont’s” for independent publishers, which can be quite helpful to consider when you’re embarking on your next big independent publishing project. All of them are particularly smart things to keep in mind, and are questions that one should definitely revisit each time you publish a book.

His bottom line, however, is that when it comes to publishing independently, nothing is set in stone. So with that in mind, here are a couple of additional pieces of advice to consider, especially for keeping yourself in a good state of mind when entering the wonderful world of independent publishing.

1) Let it work for you. You will need to make a decision on how much effort and time you devote to the project. If you would like to make a living off of independent publishing (which is still very hard to achieve), then you will need to give it your all. If you are only able to give half of your attention, then recognize that the results might not be as great as you expected. Keep your expectations in line with your effort.

2) There is no magic formula. Some books take off, others languish. Some of your success will depend on conditions out of your hands. So, even giving it your all might not be enough. Recognizing that we have yet to crack the magic formula of independent publishing is huge.

3) Write because you love it. Kawasaki touches on this a little bit, but I really want to stress that this is the most important part of writing. Love the act, even if it hurts sometimes. Remember that this is your passion, as well as a possible way to make some money. Here, I offer a great quote from poet Rainer Maria Rilke on how you now if you’re called to be a writer:

Go into yourself. Find out the reason that commands you to write; see whether it has spread its roots into the very depths of your heart; confess to yourself whether you would have to die if you were forbidden to write.

This most of all: ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night: must I write? Dig into yourself for a deep answer. And if this answer rings out in assent, if you meet this solemn question with a strong, simple “I must,” then build your life in accordance with this necessity; your whole life, even into its humblest and most indifferent hour, must become a sign and witness to this impulse.

-Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet

4) Be your worst critic/best champion. Be hard on yourself — push yourself to get your book into shape, polished, and something that you really want the world to see. But once you do it, then make sure you are your best champion. You need to believe in your book before anyone else will.

As independent publishing continues to expand, the litany of advice will continue as well. What are your best inspirational tips? What has helped you avoid mistakes? What was the best advice about independent publishing that you ever received? Let us know.

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