Articles tagged "find"

Confessions of a Lulu Services Team Member


I confess. It excites me to read brilliant content from our creators. I also confess I see content with potential that lacks basic principles of composition.

The Editing Month festivities at Lulu last month challenged me to consider how one might break habitual bad writing habits and make significant changes to please the reader. I literally dusted off my grandmother’s copy of Strunk’s The Elements of Style in hopes of finding a few elements that would change any manuscript.

From William Strunk, Jr.’s The Elements of Style III. Elementary Principles of Composition:

  • Use the active voice: The active voice is more direct and vigorous than the passive. I shall always remember my first visit to Boston is much better than My first visit to Boston will always be remembered by me.
  • Put statements in positive form: Make definite assertions. Avoid tame, colorless, hesitating, non-committal language. Use the word “not” as a means of denial or in antithesis, never as a means of evasion. For example, rather than He was not very often on time one could use He usually came late.
  • Omit needless words: Read your manuscript and see how many times you see the fact that and try to replace it with since, because, though or although. Another example is “there is no doubt but that” could simply be “no doubt.”

Too often I meet authors whose excitement of a speedy book launch diminishes the importance of a thorough pre-publishing scrub. One passionate author related the book launch to taking a child to school on the first day of kindergarten. Just as parents send kids equipped with backpacks and lunch boxes, your book should be as equipped with a proper edit. Correctness is contagious.

A professional editor can review your manuscript to determine which elements could make your book an easier and more enjoyable read. Our publishing packages provide the Editorial Quality Review as well as Formatting and Cover design. Buying services in June automatically enters you to win one of two new HP Mini laptops. Plus, use the coupon SVCWIN and we’ll take 15% off any package (maximum discount $1,425).  Offer expires 6/30/2011.

*No purchase necessary. Enter coupon code SVCWIN at checkout and receive 15% off any service package or simply publish a work through Lulu.com. The maximum savings for this offer is $100. Sorry, but this offer cannot be applied to previous orders. You can only use this code once per account, and unfortunately you can’t use this coupon in combination with other coupon codes. This great offer expires on July 8, 2011 at 11:59 PM, so don’t miss out! While very unlikely, we do reserve the right to change or revoke this offer at anytime, and of course we cannot offer this coupon where it is against the law to do so. Shipping destinations must be within the United States.

Lulu at Book Expo America 2011

Last week, Lulu attended Book Expo America (BEA), the largest book convention in the nation, where attendees got the chance to meet the new face of publishing – you!

Doors opened bright and early the morning of the 24th to floods of authors, publishers, journalists, librarians, and businesses all clamoring to get the latest scoop on the publishing industry and Lulu didn’t disappoint. With exciting new initiatives such as our Open Publishing APIs, Partner Program, and growing print network, Lulu has an affordable publishing solution for just about everyone – no matter if you’re an author looking to become a publisher, or a publisher wanting to monetize your back catalogue.

We definitely stood out in our bright orange booth too, but what really stole the show were our “author-ego” cutouts (pictured).  All three days of the show people lined up at our booth to have their photos taken behind their favorite author’s body and we’d display them on our wall.  They’d also be entered for a chance to win a new Mini 5303 laptop, courtesy of our partners at HP.  I can’t tell you how many times I heard the phrase:  “My friend Blahbity Blah, told me I had to come see the Lulu booth. You’ve gotta take my picture!” And we were happy to oblige.

For those on the go, we also had
mobile author-ego cards (pictured) that folks could use with their camera phones to encourage their friends to publish (or just make them look ridiculous). At Lulu, anyone is empowered to publish and sell their work to customers all over the world and our author-ego cards and cutouts really drove that point home – that and the fact that people love to get their photo taken.

We easily talked to about 2,000 attendees, but with the way boxes of author-ego cards, Lulu hats and tote-bags were flying off our tables, we definitely reached all 30,000+ attendees.  Lulu CEO and Founder, Bob Young, also presented to convention attendees Monday, May 23rd on the future of publishing and the impact of eBooks and e-readers.

While eBooks were a hot topic among the BEA crowd this year, we were surprisingly asked about print-on-demand books even more.  This boils down to what the new generation of authors and content owners really seems to want:  options.  And with Lulu’s open-publishing model we’re providing the freedom to creators that tons of options bring.  At Lulu, you’re free to publish and sell books immediately, electronically or in print. You pick the price.  You pick the market.  You pick the medium.  You are the new face of publishing and you are in control.


 

Fun Ways to Improve Your Next Book Pt. 2

Last week, we posted some new ways to help you make your next work even more remarkable. Below are two more tips to help inspire you to put pen to paper or start hammering away on your keyboard.

3. Challenge your vocabulary at Knoword.org.

If you’re a word nerd like I am, you will quickly find yourself addicted to this vocabulary game. Unlike some games that have you match words and their meanings, this one gives you the definition and first letter, and you just fill in the word. It’s harder and faster paced than some others I’ve played. You can choose your level, and either Canadian or US dialect. This is really valuable for those studying for SAT and GRE exams, too.

4. Follow your favorite authors on Twitter.
If you’re a Twitter user, you’re probably following a number of celebrities–why not authors? Here are some of our favorite tweeting writers from a variety of genres. (Of course, the opinions expressed by these authors do not necessarily reflect those of Lulu, so tweet at your own risk!)

Science Fiction author Cory Doctorow @doctorow
Young Adult writer Adam Selzer
@adamselzer
Fiction writer Chuck Palahniuk
@chuckpalahniuk
Novelist and poet Margaret Atwood
@margaretatwood
Jon Winokour gives daily quotes from famous writers, as well as goings-on from the writing and publishing world.
@AdviceToWriters

If you’re not on Twitter, it’s free to sign up! Check out InkyGirl’s Writer’s Guide to Twitter.

Be sure to check back next week for even more tips.

Wallflowers: Get Familiar with Our Lesser-Known Services

They might not be the most popular services on the block, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be an invaluable step in the process of publishing your book! Get to know these services, and see if they might be a good fit for your project.

Ghostwriting: Ghostwriting services can start from any stage of the writing process. Maybe you are an expert in naval engineering, and have an idea for a book that will totally change the industry–but you’re too busy to sit down behind the computer, or just don’t have the writing skill to make a cohesive sentence. Maybe you’ve been working on your book for years, but you still don’t feel that it’s complete, and could use the talents of a co-author to help you finish. Maybe you have the bones of the book, but need some help in fleshing it out. Our ghostwriters can help! We have a talented team of writers with years of experience, who are eager to help you with your project. Learn more about Ghostwriting Services or get a Ghostwriting Consultation.

Transcription: Transcription services turn a printed manuscript into a digital Word document. Examples might include your grandfather’s memoirs, written on a typewriter and coil-bound at a copy center, or a book you published previously, that you want to reprint, but you only have the printed book. Once you have the Word document, you can then take the next steps of publishing, either formatting and designing it yourself, or using one of Lulu’s pre-publishing packages to help you with the work. Request a consultation and express your interest in transcription services.

Media List: The Media list will answer one really big question for you when it comes to Book Publicity: Who? In a world where more than 800 books are published daily, you’ll need to make a great first impression to the right audience. Our Media List Service will help you create a refined list of exactly who to contact. You’ll work with a publicist who will consult with you about your goals, possible publicity angles, media preferences and the best way to stir up interest in you and your book. In the end you’ll have a targeted media list of local, regional and national print (magazine and newspaper), broadcast (radio and television), and online (e-zines, blogs, websites) outlets in the US and Canada in Excel and mailing label formats; minimum of 500 targeted media contacts. One idea … Pair this with a Press Release Writing service and prepare for liftoff. Learn more.

Fun Ways to Improve Your Next Book Pt. 1

Okay, so you’ve published your first book on Lulu.com. Now what? Keep writing, that’s what! You want to keep exercising that writing muscle, and anyway, what’s cooler than saying you’re working on your second book? Here are some fun ways to get inspired and make your second even better than your first.

1. Join or start a writing group.
Sometimes, you are not your best motivator or your best critic. Finding or starting a writing group is not easy, but it can be very rewarding. Some groups are more like workshops, where everyone critiques one another’s writing, while others are organized simply to set aside time to write, and can be as basic as three or four people clustered around a coffee shop table with laptops, just writing. If you don’t have writer friends who want to join you, I suggest trying Meetup.com to find a group in your area. I found 34 groups within ten miles of the Lulu.com headquarters.

2. Organize your writing with Google Docs.
This free, multi-faceted tool is great for writers who are either constantly moving from home, to office, to laptop, to phone, or for multiple authors collaborating on one project. You create a document that’s stored online, and you and your collaborators can access it from any computer. As a fiction writer, I use this tool to keep track of my characters–each one gets his or her own page, with traits and personal thoughts–and also my personal to-do lists, since I work from three different computers over the course of a day. Be sure to check out
Google’s introduction to Google Docs.

Be sure to check back in next week for more tips in part 2.

Author Feature: Elizabeth Wright

Author of Dear Bob, Dear Betty:  Love and Marriage During the Great Depression

Helping a New Generation of Authors

As authors out in the world, I bet most of you think about the changing publishing industry on a semi-daily basis. But, have you stopped to consider how those changes are sculpting future generation’s education?

Everyday, new stories pop up about students using e-versions of their text books to learn with, like those at Wilkes University and Northern Michigan University. Some schools, like Cushing Academy in Boston, have even gotten rid of their libraries completely in favor of e-readers.

Well, 12 year old Kyle Nelson, a student from Millennium Charter Academy in Mount Airy NC,  is living out these changes in his daily education. Nelson, wanting to know more about the companies shaking up the publishing industry and the technology behind them, went straight to the source.

On February 18th, Nelson came to Lulu and got the chance to interview our team members Tracey and Allison.

“He was so curious about the future of the industry,” says Allison. “He wanted to know all about eBooks and digital publishing.”

Tracey and Allison gave Nelson a tour, walked him through Lulu’s publishing process, and sent him home with a goodie bag and tons of information. Nelson plans to present to his classmates later this month.

“He was super smart and a sweet kid,” says Allison. “He was excited to get to pitch Lulu to a whole new generation of kids.”

Lulu is great for educators and their students too because it’s always free to make revisions and teachers get to set their own price for their content. This ensures that students always receive the most up-to-date information at a cost significantly lower than your average text book, but at the same great quality. Some teachers even offer supplementary materials as free eBooks to download. All of the control is in the teacher’s hands to provide a more structured learning experience. To learn more, head over to our education portal at www.lulu.com/education.