Articles tagged "how to sell books"

Facebook CEO resolves to read 26 books in 2015

Could yours be one of them?

 

Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Facebook, is known for his ambitious New Year’s resolutions. Last year he learned to speak Mandarin. In past years he became a vegetarian (except for animals he killed himself), made an effort to meet a new person everyday (who was not a Facebook employee), wrote a thank you note everyday, and wore a tie every day (well, this one isn’t as extraordinary).

This year’s resolution, announced on January 2nd, is as equally impressive. “My challenge for 2015 is to read a new book every other week — with an emphasis on learning about different cultures, beliefs, histories and technologies”

He is also challenging all Facebook users who like his A Year of Books page to read the same books in the same time period. The page invites everyone to “read a new book every two weeks and discuss it here…. Suggestions for new books to read are always welcome.”

As of this writing, A Year of Books has received over 225,000 likes and Amazon announced that the first title to be read, The End of Power by Moisés Naím has already sold out. Lucky for us, print-on-demand books never sell out!

We are encouraging all Lulu.com non-fiction authors who specialize in cultural writing, belief systems, history, or technology, to tell Mr. Zuckerberg about your book.

It’s easy to do

  • Visit the Facebook page, A Year of Books and click the Like button to join the group.
  • Pitch your book on the page. Tell Mr. Zuckerberg how your book will help him learn about different cultures, beliefs, histories and technologies. Think of this as your 30-second elevator speech and don’t forget to include a link to your book to make it easy to find.
  • Tell your fans, friends and family that you’ve nominated your book to be read so they can like your post.
  • And, finally be sure to let us know you submitted your book for consideration. Simply tag us in your pitch by including Lulu.com in the post or using the hashtag #Lulu.

We wish you the best of luck and hope to see your book on Mr. Zuckerberg’s 2015 reading list.

Email Marketing 101: Making the Most of Seasonal Sales

Let’s try out a few seasonal metaphors for your email marketing efforts…

Stuff your readers’ stockings with email! Deck the halls with deals on eBooks! Pass the turkey and mashed potatoes… and… strategically develop an email marketing plan that takes advantage of Lulu.com’s sales and special offers…

Okay, so that last one doesn’t really flow. But – it’s good advice all the same. Email marketing that coincides with Lulu’s impressive special offers is the next best thing to having your books carried right down your readers’ chimneys.

What’s so great about it? For starters, email marketing works. Social media may seem the savvier approach, but email is roughly six times more effective at bringing in new buyers than Facebook and Twitter. Email gives you a great platform for sharing special offers and introducing new books, without your carefully crafted content getting lost in the endless scroll of tweets and status updates.

And it’s simple. We were recently inspired to share a template with you based on an email from one of our authors to his reader base. So, you can take what’s below based on an offer we currently have running – and be sure to get the email out soon.

 

Email Subject Line: Get <Book Title> for 35% Off

Email Body:

Have you ordered a printed copy of <book title> yet? <Placeholder for one line description of title> If you haven’t placed your order already, then today is the day to do it.

Until December 3, you can save 35% by checking out with code WQT32 on Lulu.com. Simply visit the link: <Placeholder for link to book>, add it to your cart and apply the code at checkout to have your discount applied.

Plus, you can grab copies at a great deal to share with friends and family.

Grab a copy today! <Link to book>

<Author name>

 

See? Simple. You can highlight the current savings, briefly describe the book, and gives easy instructions. It’s low-pressure, good-natured, informative and brief. You can even provide a link right to your Author Spotlight and save your readers from searching.

And, though we are currently entering the season of sharing and shopping, this strategy works year-round. At Lulu.com, we’re always looking for ways to promote you and sell your books. Whenever we have a sale — seasonal or otherwise — send out an email blast letting everyone know. After all, ‘tis always the season for reading!

Expand Your Distribution and Reach More Readers

At Lulu.com, we want to give every author the tools they need to have a chance at success. After all, there’s a lot to do with your self-published book between editing it, formatting it and designing the perfect cover. That doesn’t even include writing it! But there’s one aspect you might not have given a lot of thought to yet: how exactly are you going to sell your book?

Selling on Lulu.com is a great start, but to reach the largest pool of potential readers you need to be in the most stores possible – that means Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com and more. Luckily, Lulu.com’s globalREACH distribution service lists your book on websites around the world in a few quick steps.

So why should your book have globalREACH? Well, there’s no reason not to get it! Worried that it’ll take too much time and effort on your part to get everything set-up? Think again – it couldn’t be any easier.

You Can’t Judge a Book By Its Cover. But….

We’ve all heard the old idiom, “You can’t judge a book by its cover.” And that’s totally right — judging something based on a first glance often leads to false impressions and close-mindedness. However, covers, even in the age of eBooks, are still an incredibly important part of the browsing experience, and are often the first interaction a prospective reader has with a book. A cover should be artful, interesting, and represent some essence of the book. Often, it’s the only actual image a reader will receive to spark their imagining of the world of the novel.

But, sometimes, especially with first-time authors, or authors whose art is solely the written word, covers can bring you the wrong kind of attention. For instance, you don’t want to show up on Nathan Shumate’s Lousy Book Covers Tumblr. While his site has caught a lot of flack, and unfairly ridicules artistic endeavors, he does offer some wise words in a Huffington Post article for authors when it comes to book design:

“Print design is a mode of communication all its own, and there is at least as much study and experience involved in gaining a competence in design skills as there is to becoming a credible wordsmith…a book’s author is not automatically qualified to design her own cover.”

It’s true that there are tons of authors out there who are also insanely capable and skilled artists, but sometimes, we writers tend to overreach. We think, because we have just finished a book, why not just knock off the cover art right there? It’s best to take a step back and think about different artistic skill sets. The last thing an author wants to do is put off a potential reader because of an unattractive cover.

Like everything else an independent author does, getting a nice cover for your book is a mix of networking and savvy. One idea is to take the whole cover design project and to make it into a promotion for your book. Post a sample chapter of your book and ask readers to use it to come up with ideas for a cover. Have a design contest, with the winner getting a free copy of the book they helped design. It gets the word out about your book before it’s published and can help you reach out to readers and fans. Another option is to use one of Lulu’s Book Cover Design services. A great way to avoid the “lousy cover” trap is to put the job in the hands of a professional artist.

And even though they are important, don’t fret too hard over the cover. As prominent book cover artist Chip Kidd reminds us in an Esquire article titled How to Make People Buy Books: “There are so many factors that go into whether somebody buys a book — the jacket’s just one of them.”

And, to end on a high note, we have plenty of noteworthy examples of exemplary book covers by independent authors. You can peruse them in our Pinterest Indie Cover of the Day Album.