Articles tagged "Internet"

The Best Web Resources for Authors (Part 2)

In an earlier blog post we went over some of the Internet’s best sites for the latest on publishing, finding a critique buddy or group, and even writing prompts. But that’s of course not all the Web has to offer. Here are a few others you might want to check out:

Mashable: Think you know social media? Think again. This self-proclaimed “largest independent news source dedicated to covering digital culture, social media and technology” features helpful articles on what’s trending (hint: keep checking to see if there’s a PR opportunity for your book); the latest must-have apps; and the marketing campaigns that have caught their expert’s eyes. If you’re looking to find out who’s showing off their stuff right, visit Mashable and learn from the best.

Seth Godin’s Blog: Seth Godin is a marketer extraordinaire. No, really. Just ask American Way magazine, which called him “America’s Best Marketer.” How did he earn such a title? Well, in addition to publishing 14 books (now available in 30 languages), he’s also founded dozens of companies. Although he admits that some failed, his latest– Squidoo.com, a platform for publishing original, user-crafted lifestyle content on single topic pages–averages 13.1M U.S. visitors per month and 27M worldwide. In short, listen to his thoughts on “the circles of marketing,” taking risks, and, well, anything else.

The Coalition of Independent Authors: Speaking of those risks Mr. Godin talks about, if you’ve published (whether independently or not) you’ve taken the biggest one a creative type can.

The Telepathy Standard

Once upon a time, there was a clear distinction between author and publisher.  Despite everyone’s knowledge and expertise, not everyone had access to the tools and resources necessary to make content public. Publishing was a closed system. Now, thanks to the Internet and digital text, publishing is open and more and more opportunities are becoming available to creators, businesses, developers and publishers alike – everyday.

Today we live in a world where it’s possible for someone to share their ideas instantaneously across multiple devices and platforms – electronically or in print.

But what comes next?

Lulu Founder and CEO Bob Young shares his thoughts on that question in the The Telepathy Standard below as he highlights why telepathy is the gold standard by which authors transfer content to their readers and how we are getting closer to that standard everyday with advances in technology.

Lulu at Internet Summit 2010

The 2010 Internet Summit in Raleigh, North Carolina wrapped up yesterday, with Internet professionals and entrepreneurs from across the United States coming together to discuss topics such as mobile marketing and social ecommerce. Our very own Bob Young was a keynote panelist and featured speaker discussing the future of both the web and books – no doubt two very broad and engaging topics.

Bob’s featured talk was entitled “There is No Such Thing as a Book” – claiming that “whatever replaces the book on the Internet is not going to look like a book.” During Bob’s talk and as a fan of René Magritte, I couldn’t help but imagine someone somewhere in the world wearing a t-shirt with a picture of a Kindle or an iPad and the sentence “Ceci n’est pas une livre” (I’ll wait while you go Google Translate that).  Traditionally, we have all come to know and love books in their physical form, but now, “books” are hyper-mobile strings of binary code easily accessible and translatable on multiple devices. A modern-day book’s physical properties are seemingly confined only by the Wi-Fi signals that transmit them.

Bob argued that, “the device you are reading on is going to become more pleasurable,” as a plethora of textual enhancements like video and hypertext accompany the written word. The question for some, however, is whether all you need is a good story? Things like video, hyperlinks and an Internet connect may actually detract from a book’s narrative – diminishing the pleasure derived from an uninterrupted read. Personally, I think that in the future, some readers may intentionally choose to remain on one side of the digital divide, opting to read stories on books – not devices. But of course, that will remain a question of preference and choice, and if there is one thing the future of the web will include – it is choice.

For those of you who were unable to attend the event and enjoy all the interactivity that digital media has to offer, be sure to check out a recap of the lively discussions on Twitter #isum10.

We’d like to thank the organizers of the Internet Summit for putting on such an informative and well-organized event, and we look forward to seeing you again next year.