Articles tagged "lulu self publishing"

10 Quotes to Spark Your Writing

10 Quotes to Inspire Authors

Writing can often feel like a solitary endeavor: you sit down at your computer or notepad, take a sip of your coffee, and do your best to shut out the rest of the world as you put words to paper.

But you’re not alone! Some of the most successful authors in history know the struggle you’re going through and have persevered. Check out these quotes to make you smile, think, and get inspired as you get ready to write this weekend.


 

“Exercise the writing muscle every day, even if it is only a letter, notes, a title list, a character sketch, a journal entry. Writers are like dancers, like athletes. Without that exercise, the muscles seize up.” – Jane Yolen

 

“I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.” – Douglas Adams

 

“It’s none of their business that you have to learn to write. Let them think you were born that way.” – Ernest Hemingway

 

“Get it down. Take chances. It may be bad, but it’s the only way you can do anything really good.” – William Faulkner

 

“The scariest moment is always just before you start.” – Stephen King

 

“Don’t be a writer; be writing.” – William Faulkner

 

“Almost anyone can be an author; the business is to collect money and fame from this state of being.” – A. A. Milne

 

“If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.” – Edgar Rice Burroughs

 

“You can’t wait for inspiration, you have to go after it with a club.” – Jack London

 

“It is perfectly okay to write garbage—as long as you edit brilliantly.” – C. J. Cherryh


 

Have some of your own favorite quotes on writing? Share them in the comments!

World Diabetes Day

Did you know that roughly 10% of the U.S. population has diabetes? It is the seventh leading cause of death in the country, with the total number of deaths from diabetes projected to rise by more than 50% in the next 10 years. Needless to say it is an epidemic that effects more people on a daily basis than we realize. In fact, the medical community projects that by the year 2050, one in three Americans will have some form of diabetes.

World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organization in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat that diabetes poses. For some people the disease is unavoidable, while others can take strategic steps, like controlling diet and exercise, to prevent the disease. Yes, the statistics are scary. But the good news is that there are many foundations, blogs, and, of course, books out there dedicated to keeping people informed and to providing support for those who suffer directly from the disease.

At Lulu.com, we are lucky enough to have some great titles right at our fingertips. Whether you have been personally touched by diabetes or if you are just looking for a way to learn more, here are a few books that may be just what you’re looking for.

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Diabetic Recipes
by Mark Duffy

Millions of people have diabetes and have to maintain a special diet. But this doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the things you like, you just have to make them a little differently.

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The Truth about Type 1 Diabetes: The Myths Exposed
by Caitlynn Oberhausen

Children with type 1 diabetes, T1DM, live with a widely misunderstood, chronic disease. The daily management regimens and psychosocial aspect of TIDM bring attention to the child with diabetes. Myths and misconceptions of diabetes management abound. The intent of this book is to address these myths and misconceptions as well as provide a basic understanding of what life with T1DM is like.

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“The Bitter Sweet Life”- A teenagers journey with Diabetes by Ruhi Kumar

15 Year old Ruhi has had diabetes since she was nine years old. This book illustrates the challenges and obstacles Type 1 diabetes brings to ones life, and how with motivation, dedication and proper treatment, it is in fact possible to lead a completely active and healthy life with diabetes.

For additional titles on Diabetes, check out our bookstore here.

The Modern Poet

It’s National Poetry Month and in conjunction with Poets.org, we are celebrating the works and contributions of poets from all over the world.  Check out all of the happenings here.

Poets face an interesting dilemma in the contemporary publishing field — while the rest of the industry is in flux, their lot remains mostly the same. Poetry will never produce huge runaway successes like fiction or non-fiction, but it has a devoted, loving fan base who show up in droves to see poets read as well as for the classes they teach.

And while the rest of the writing world migrates towards independent publishing, poets have been doing that for some time — they have produced chapbooks and other artistic distribution methods for as long as they’ve written.  And because poetry is so compact and the poet so fervently believes in their material (as well as being more of a presence in their poetry than say, fiction writers) they are first-adopters of many new technologies, from the wonders of dial-a-poem to poetry in motion.

So eBooks are no different. Poet Susie DeFord self-published her eBook of poetry “Dogs of Brooklyn” after years of trying to get it published through a traditional publisher. She told Galleycat:

“I paid to submit to first book contests for almost two years, so I lost money and time trying to do it the old-fashioned way. I suppose that time spent revising/ editing/ swearing/ and feeling rejected made for a better book and some character building, but there are so many cool easy ways to self-publish and get your work out there from blogs to books. I think poets and writers in general should try to make their book the best book possible and not rush into publishing.”

While rushing a book out doesn’t help the work, knowing that one can publish their book of poetry and have it on hand for readings is a huge boon to poets, who often do much of their selling through readings and events.

But the switch to eBooks has not been entirely smooth. Because of the added formatting issues of poetry, a lot of poets have had issues when converting their verse to eBooks and eReaders. Because spacing and breaks are so important, and the viewing and formatting options of eBooks can easily be altered, poets are having a hard time getting their formatting right. Ira Silverberg, director of literature for the National Endowment for the Arts, told the Washington Post:

“Right now, we’re talking about conversion of print files to digital files and the greatest issue is in the poetry community. If you’re working on a Kindle or Nook or Kobo device, and you shoot up a page, you lose the line breaks depending on how you’ve formatted your preferences.”

Poets are trying to work out the kinks, however. Judging on the level of creativity that goes into a poet’s existence, we’re betting that they’ll figure it out.

What has your experience been independently publishing poetry? Have you had issues with your eBook formatting? How has it changed your life as a poet?

Need Some Publishing Help?

Lulu HelpThe Lulu help section has been updated with quite a few new entries. As Nick mentioned, there are now a number of great video tutorials that will help you get through the publishing process, but we’ve also added a lot more information in general. There are sections on how to set creator revenue and the final price of your Lulu content and the different paper options for books. Lots of answers to common publishing questions can be found in the Lulu help section.

The Lulu help section is a perfect place for any aspiring author to start before getting ready to tackle the publishing process.

Click Here to Go To Lulu Help.

Lulu Author Interview: Ken Henderson

I stumbled across Ken Henderson’s NHL editorial comics while reading an NHL fansite. A visit to his website led me back to www.Lulu.com and his storefront.

From Ken’s Bio:

I grew up playing in the coal hills of Union Bay dreaming of designing future worlds and creatures for George Lucas. Decades later, after working for numerous companies, including LucasFilm, I find myself back at home being amazed at the beauty of the island I left. I’m thrilled to say that technology has enabled me to bring my wonderful young family back to Courtenay where I continue to pursue my craft.

Ken’s artwork ranges from sports to fantasy. His career has led him to producing the artwork for video games and kid’s television shows. He also spent time working for Lucas Arts, any geeks dream come true.

Ken has made his artwork available through Lulu.com and also can be found on his website and in and online at the Georgia Straight (Vancouver area).

Some Examples:

Ken was nice enough to conduct an email interview with me this week. Read it after the Jump.