Articles tagged "Nigel Lee"

What’s New at Lulu? Everything Is About to Change

Prior to the launch of Glasstree, our academic and educational publishing brand, we asked CEO Nigel Lee what changes Lulu authors can expect in the coming months.

Since this interview was recorded, we have moved into our new space, Glasstree was successfully launched, and our focus has returned to refining the new publishing tools, opening new distribution options, and redesigning Lulu.com.

As Nigel says, “Watch this space. Everything is about to change.”

Nigel Lee: Global Businesses Must Be Locally Relevant

Lulu CEO, Nigel Lee, lives in Brussels, leads a company headquartered on the East Coast of the USA, and travels the world seeking new partners and new markets to better serve authors around the world.

In today’s interview, we chat about Lee’s eight-hour commute and discuss how living outside of the USA affects his corporate leadership and vision for Lulu.

Lee believes companies can only be truly global when they address regional needs. “Internationalization of a business doesn’t just mean making it available in Hungarian, or in French or in Italian. It means understanding regional requirements, country-specific requirements. What do authors in Italy need? What does Italian book distribution look like? What are the bookstores in Italy?”

Lulu works to make the world a better place – one author, one story and one local regulation at a time.

 

Nigel Lee, Lulu CEO: Passion, Partners, Publishing and Profits

Two years ago we cheered in* Nigel Lee as a new team member in our Raleigh office. We welcomed him as Head of International Business – now he’s Lulu’s CEO.

Nigel came to us with a background in international banking focusing on risk, finance, and regulatory issues. Since then, he’s learned quite a bit about the publishing industry as well as the passion that drives Lulu authors.

Last November we took a break from packing for our upcoming move to chat about his time with Lulu and the publishing industry in general.

Publishing really hasn’t changed much since Shakespeare’s time. At its essence publishing is still write, print and sell. Today, there are just a lot more people making a profit from an author’s effort resulting in the creator receiving a smaller and smaller piece of the pie.

That’s why we need Lulu.
Lulu rewards creators, not shareholders.

 

*If you are wondering what is meant by “cheer in,” this is how we welcomed new employees at our previous location. Nigel is the one in the jacket – loving it.

Getting to Know Lulu CEO Nigel Lee

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“This is a truly amazing team and a truly amazing company. When I look at Lulu, I believe that it’s time to stop referring to what we do as self-publishing. It’s really independent publishing for independent authors and creators. The real difference is in who reaps the reward for creating. At Lulu, creators benefit, not the corporation. We are on the right side of history and we are setting out to prove it.” – Nigel Lee

Nigel Head ShotNigel Lee, Lulu CEO recently spoke at the Book Manufacturers’ Institute (BMI) Management Conference in Wild Dunes, South Carolina. These excerpts are from a follow-up interview that appeared in ShelfLife, the Book Manufacturers’ Institute newsletter (Vol 11, Issue 2).

BMI:  Your team wants to make content creation and consumption a simpler and more rewarding experience for people around the world. Lulu.com is available in six languages: English, French, Spanish, German, Italian and Dutch. How did you so successfully get the word out about how Lulu.com could help writers and authors?

Nigel Lee: The key to the success of any business idea is that it has to solve a problem. Lulu.com solved a problem and was the first to bring the solution to a global audience. The problem was a simple one. It was traditionally very difficult to get a book published. Most publishers operated (and still do!) based on a profit censorship model. They  would only show interest in titles they felt would make them money. This resulted in millions of voices not being heard, millions of books not being published. Given the inherent costs of publishing, traditionally publishers would then take the lion’s share of all profits generated by a title.

Lulu.com reversed this model entirely. Lulu.com accepts all titles, within the boundaries of the law. The author retains all ownership and control and keeps up to 90% of all profits. Lulu.com proliferated this model via the Internet. Given the disruptive and much needed model Lulu.com offered and the fact that Lulu was first to market allowing authors to engage directly and simply with just a web browser, Lulu.com grew very quickly. Lulu continues to be successful based on the core principles of the original business idea.

Key to Lulu.com’s success is the continued ability to understand its customers and react accordingly. The launch of Glasstree Academic Publishing later this year is a clear example of listening to our customers and developing a business to serve their needs directly.

BMI: What role has your comfort with technology played in your professional success?

Lee: Technology is simply a tool, like a shovel or a fork. Using the latest tools available has been a constant in the evolution of our species and I’m born of a generation that is perfectly comfortable with the increased pace of such developments. My personal success has come from an ability to articulate the value of a technology to the audience who can benefit from it.

BMI: You are known for welcoming disruption and challenging the status quo. Why do you think this is necessary and important for businesses seeking transformation?

Lee: I prefer the term ‘breaking orthodoxy’ rather than disruption. Breaking orthodoxy is critical to building businesses that solve problems. You have to think about doing things in a different way, a better way. The bigger the problem, or the more exploitative the existing model, the greater your likelihood of being disruptive will be when breaking that orthodoxy

BMI: We very much admire Lulu Jr., the program that allows children to become published authors, encouraging creativity, strengthening literacy and building self-esteem. Tell us more about this initiative.

Lee: Lulu Junior is based on a simple premise that children learn most while writing and not while reading. Fostering creativity and writing in young children is a powerful way of growing their cognitive abilities across all disciplines. That we are able to provide ways in which to stimulate child development is just a very worthwhile thing to do.

BMI: Why is Lulu’s sponsorship and involvement in the Lulu eGames at North Carolina State University so important to you and your team? How do they promote entrepreneurship and innovation?

Lee: Lulu is an entrepreneurial company. Entrepreneurship is the life source of any economy and therefore society; however, the development of these skills is often overlooked in higher education. NC State is a very forward thinking university that recognized the value of developing entrepreneurial skills. Being part of this initiative gives Lulu the opportunity to contribute to society and promote entrepreneurship beyond the walls of its own organization. As a certified B-Corp company, we are deeply committed to doing everything we can to make the world a better place and this is a key part of that endeavor.

BMI: Speaking of innovation, if time and money were no object, what “invention” or change do you think could make the most difference for two of your passions – children and their opportunities for a quality education?

Lee: We need to see ourselves as a single society. To understand that the key to addressing all of our challenges and inequalities is the ability to act in unison. Technology is accelerating this evolution. The internet is making the world a smaller place everyday. We are no longer blind to the inequities of our society and the damage caused by tribal instincts for power and control and the fight over regional scarcity of resources. Every child has a right to basic human necessities; health, clean water, food, shelter, education and love. At a certain moment in time we will recognize that this is the key to our future as a race. The day we recognize it isn’t acceptable for more than 60 million children to have no schooling will be the day my dream starts to come true. This number has halved in the last 16 years, but will take an estimated 70 more years before the number is even close to zero. Technology has an incredibly important role to play, if companies are willing to play their part in making the world a better place.

Want to know more?

Follow Nigel on LinkedIn and Twitter (@blindfoldzebra)

Have a question for Nigel?

Is there something you would like to know about Lulu or Glasstree Academic Publishing?  Submit your questions to pr@lulu.com. Enter Question for Nigel in the subject line. Your question could be answered in a future article.

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