Articles tagged "photography books"

Photo books

Lulu photo books are great for two types of people:
1. Professional photographers.
2. Everyone else with a camera.

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I’ll go through a case study of sorts with both types. Firstly, take “Bloke.” He’s a professional photographer in England who’s become a friend of mine. Check out this photo of a little girl at a wedding… Bloke wonders, “do you think she knows it’s a lemon?” I could gush for paragraphs about how much I love this shot. But I’ll let you do your own gushing. The point is, Bloke is a brilliant photographer – and he’s a fan of Lulu photo books. They work for him because they look like “real published ‘coffee table’ books, not chunky heavy albums with bits that fall out when you pick them up”. Great for clients, too.

asdfaf Photo credit: blokewithacamera.co.uk

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Second example: the point-and-shooter (like me). I took this shot in Cape Haitian, Haiti in June 2007. The sign is in Haitian Creole, and reads “Protect the environment- it guarantees life”.  This picture sums up my experience in Haiti pretty nicely- bright colors, joy, hope, and a smidgen of desolation. By no means is it professional grade. The lighting is all wrong, I’m sure my angles are laughable, etcetera (pros don’t hate on me too hard!). But that’s not what matters- it’s a memory. I love this shot for its nostalgic value, not artistic brilliance. I’m putting it into a photo book for the sole sake of remembering. The only person who’d appreciate the photo book as much is my dad- and that’s completely fine.

So – are you a professional (a la Bloke) or a point-and-shooter like me? Maybe a little of both? Either way- check out Lulu photo books and Bloke’s photography website for some eye candy.

Author interview: Richard Galbraith

Richard Galbraith is a rock band photographer who has recently published a book of KISS photographs. I got a chance to interview him for the Lulu blog.

How long have you been taking photos of rock bands?

My father had sent a 35mm camera while he was overseas, so my first attempt at taking pictures at a concert was around 1971 at a Bloodrock and Grand Funk Railroad concert. Guess I was around 13. Next Alice Cooper, but it was a few years after that before I really got anything decent. We lived around 100 miles from Oklahoma City so it was a bit of a challenge getting to concerts at that age. I shot a lot of shows in the 2nd half of the 70’s, but by the time the 80’s hit, it was a lot harder to get passes for shows. By the time the 90’s got here it was very seldom that I took pictures unless Ronnie Dio had
a concert in the area.