Articles tagged "writer"

Authors using Helix Review: Kareem Kamal El Gazzar

Screen Shot 2013-08-28 at 10.50.43 AMThrough the autumn, Lulu is featuring authors who have used the Helix Review to gain insight into their writing style and explore new marketing opportunities for their book. Today’s interview is with Kareem Kamal El Gazzar, author of 4 Steps to Your Authentic Career, a business-meets-self-help book about converting passions into dreams and matching dreams to priorities.

Quick Description of the Book

In 4 Steps to Your Authentic Career: How to Discover Your True Career Path, Kareem Kamal El Gazzar makes career-related observations that might be helpful to people entering the workforce. He talks about the need to become an authentic leader who defines career success as “a life and work that brings personal fulfillment and lasting relationships while also making a difference.”  The author discusses three different attitudes people have toward their careers: He calls them the Road, the Horse, and the Cart. The Road, writes El Gazzar, represents individuals who love a career filled with the exhilaration and excitement of action. The Horse, who races just for the pleasure of running, typifies someone who is happy simply doing their work. Individuals represented by the Cart are interested in what is being carried by one’s work, such as values or character. El Gazzar makes the point that the Cart is likely to be the most useful attitude. “Great careers have a point of view and are not just a job,” he writes. “You need to believe in something.”

How would you describe your writing style?

I like to write about a wide range of topics and themes, including government and social discourse, dreams and nightmares, history, academics, culture, financial matters and money.

Why did you decide to submit 4 Steps to Your Authentic Career for a Helix Review?

To be able to get an objective evaluation of my book.

How are you going to use what you learned?

I have learned about my book themes compared to other titles in my chosen genre, plus I have learned about other books that are similar to mine. I will read the books that are similar to my book and try to elaborate on my original book ideas and themes by writing a new book focusing on these elaborated themes and ideas.

What would you tell someone considering trying Helix?

It is really amazing that there is a product like the Helix Review for writers.

For more information about Kareem Kamal El Gazzar and 4 Steps to Your Authentic Career:

About the Helix Review

Back in May we launched an experimental new offering called Helix, and dubbed it The Personality Test for Your Book. Helix is powered by The Book Genome Project, a massive database of over 100,000 of the world’s best-known books. And basically, it gives you a way to upload your manuscript and get back an incredibly rich and unbiased perspective on your book.

Lulu authors are currently using Helix to gain a better understanding of their book for marketing purposes, and in some cases to gain insight into their writing style. For the first time, we’ve caught up with some of the earliest Helix Review customers to hear more about their book and writing style and what they hoped to learn from Helix.

If you are an author that has used Helix and would like to be featured in the future, please tell us about your experience here.

Helix Review webinar opportunity

It’s really hard to get an objective, unbiased perspective on your book. Actually, it can be really hard just to get someone to read your book. Picture this — your book read and analyzed to reveal insights you never thought you’d be able to get from anyone. Ever. Meet Helix.

Helix is the brain behind the Helix Review, “the ultimate unbiased perspective on your book,” as one knowledgeable author put it. The Helix Review tells you not whether your book is good or bad, but reveals the innermost workings of your prose and how it compares to other works in your genre. The Helix Review allows you to uncover who your readers are by comparing you book to well known titles and authors.

Up until now, this kind of analysis has involved some pretty sophisticated tools, including a magic eight ball, your editor’s best guess, the psychic network, or your mom’s opinion.

Lulu is providing a free look into the Helix Review: A Personality Test for Your Book. Join us for the webinar on April 26 at 1:00 p.m. ET to get an in-depth look at this tool that compares your writing to more than 100,000 classics. You’ll also have the opportunity to provide input into shaping the future direction of the Helix Review. Register now.

Should eBooks even try to be books?

Photo Source: Gizmodo

We can all agree that when it comes to eBooks, we’re still at the very early stages of their existence. Like early video games or early films, we have yet to push the boundaries that will ultimately define the format.

In a piece for Gizmodo, businessman Kane Hsieh asks why we persist in creating eBooks that are still grounded on the model of a physical book. Like when television shows were simply filmed stage plays, he believes we’re at the beginning of a long period of innovation — if only we allow ourselves to get the technology and the business model right.

He writes:

The problem with eBooks as they exist now is the lack of user experience innovation. Like the first television shows that only played grainy recordings of theater shows, the eBook is a new medium that has yet to see any true innovation, and resorts to imitating an old medium. This is obvious in skeuomorphic visual cues of eBook apps. Designers have tried incredibly hard to mimic the page-turns and sound effects of a real book, but these ersatz interactions satisfy a bibliophile as much as a picture of water satisfies a man in the desert.

Which is exactly why eBooks should keep changing. Only when authors conceive of eBooks as something different than a physical book (which, we’ve established, aren’t going anywhere), will eBooks really take off and come into their own. Something that Hsieh points out is the rise of serialized fiction — authors can now write books and release chapters as they go — imagine receiving input from your fan-base on what should happen next, or where you’ve gone wrong and possible corrections you can make.

Another great point he brings up is the idea of bundling print and digital books together. He describes how in other technology shifts, like the one from a CD to MP3 to putting them on the cloud, you only had to buy the song once. Yet with books and eBooks, you end up buying the book several times as you buy it physically, digitally, and then sometimes again for digital as readers shift. He makes the great point that the time is coming for a flat price for a book, both digital and physical, to be yours in perpetuity.

That brings him to his last point, which is the idea of a eBook subscription service, similar to the music-sharing site Spotify. Book subscriptions hearken back to the age of book-of-the-month clubs, when you would get a different book each month. Now, Hsieh, and a lot of businesses, are pushing for a subscription to all the eBooks you would want to read for a single monthly rate.

These are all interesting ideas, and definitely are exciting for fans of both reading and technology.

Do you think eBooks will continue to change? How so? And would you buy a subscription to all eBooks? Let us know!

Are eBooks a different genre than print ones?

eBooks as their own genre?

Writing in The Guardian, Stuart Kelly has proposed a radical idea: that eBooks should be treated as a different genre than regular print books. Why? The fantastic possibilities of eBooks shouldn’t be bound (haha) to the confines of print and pages. In short, Kelly calls for something that proponents of eBooks have been saying for a while: let’s treat it like a bold new invention, rather than a standard digital copy of a physical book.

Of course, there are always going to be eBooks that closely mimic a regular physical book. eBooks based on older works, or eBooks that would like to closely mimic a physical one because of market reasons (think of Harry Potter — you only want one version running around, really). But the possibilities that eBooks (as a genre) present have yet to be fully explored.

For one, we don’t read eBooks like we read a physical book. Physical books have a monopoly on our attention and also don’t receive information from us. They are static. eBooks are often read as one choice among many of digital applications, with the ability to be amended, personalized, and improved.

An eBook that allows an author to change section, to move up plot points depending on reader input, to change the entire setting based on a reader’s location — that is a wholly different genre than that of regular books, and is obviously where we’re heading (some of the more adventurous of us). Not only that, but eBooks can be constantly updated to provide for further coverage of a current event (or a fictional one). Imagine an eBook that updates the details of a giant, mythical battle, as it was happening. It would basically be a real-time report of total fiction. In other words, incredibly exciting!

I believe that eBooks will become their own genre, much in the way that board games became video games. First, they were limited facsimiles of the original, then they became immersive and even more user-oriented. While some eBooks will remain very much similar to our concept of a regular book now (as they should), enhanced eBooks will become their own genre, replete with all the technological wizardry and components that the medium (tablets, computers, phones, etc.) can afford.

We have barely begun to scratch the surface of what eBooks can do, and a call to think of eBooks as something wholly different from our romantic notion of the hardback will lead us to some very interesting (and cool) places.

As authors, what do you think about eBooks as their own genre?

How To: Serialize with Lulu

There was such great response from Lulu authors at our blog post about a resurgence of interest in novel serialization, that we thought it would be helpful to talk about…

What’s the best way to make a serial novel with Lulu?

EBooks are really the way to go with serialized material, and the most important reason is length. Sizing options for print books require 32-page minimums for the best results. Don’t get us wrong, Lulu print books are a great way to compile and release your whole, finished novel at the end of the serial novel process, but most of us can’t write 32-page chapters on a regular basis. The short length of a single chapter of a novel is much more suited to a Lulu eBook. In order to harken back to the golden age of serialization, when a reader could sit down with the newspaper and read the latest installment of a Dickens epic after current events, you’re going to need a Lulu eBook. Don’t forget that Lulu will turn your .doc, .docx, .rtf, and .odt files into an EPUB eBook file for free, and provides retail distribution.

EBooks are also less of an initial investment for the author, of both time and money, and that matches the low initial investment that comes with serialized novels. Think of eBooks as a chance to test the waters with whatever project or concept you just haven’t been able to get out of your head but you’re not sure will work on a large scale. You can write one chapter, and see if readers are engaged and excited about it. If you release Chapter One and decide, based on reader feedback, that your hero needs a sidekick, guess who you’ll be able to introduce in Chapter Two? You guessed it, the pun-hurling partner in crime of your terse heroine.

Whether you decide to go with print or electronic publication (hey, if you crank out chapters Dickensian in length, more power to you!), there are some things you’ll want to consider for your personal writing process, and some of the decisions you make after you finish an installment.

How To Choose an Editor

Happy Editing Month: How to Choose an Editor

When it comes to finding an editor to help you with your book, make sure it’s someone who responds to what you’ve written and how you’ve written it. Make no mistake: no one likes to be edited. It can be an incredibly painful process. You’re basically paying someone to poke holes in what you’ve done and critique every aspect of it from concept to comma use. Like many things in the publishing process, it requires a leap of faith, and if you want to ensure your book is marketable—or at the very least navigable to readers—then it’s absolutely necessary.

Here are a few pointers for starting the editing process, from editing expert Ellie Maas Davis:

1. Make sure your editor specializes in your genre—if you’ve written a book about the Civil War or advanced polynomials, by all means, find an editor who has edited similar titles. If you have an uncommon topic, a Lulu Services rep will be happy to give you background information about the editor most likely to tackle your manuscript.

Lulu eBooks Just Got Even Better

Tables and columns have been around for so long that we don’t give them much thought – even though our daily lives often rely on them.  One supports our dinner plates, silverware, fruit bowls, lamps, and books while the other literally supports the roof over our heads.  In recognition of all that tables and columns have contributed to civilization, we are returning the favor by supporting their use in document-to-EPUB conversions.

What are the benefits? 

For authors, uploaded Word documents that include tables and columns will now pass conversion.  This is especially good news for educators publishing text books, developers publishing tech manuals, or businesses publishing data-heavy intellectual property – all of which make excellent design use of tables and columns.

For consumers, simply clicking on the table image in an eBook will provide access to the original, raw table data.  This allows readers to interact with the data in various ways such as accessing embedded links or copy and pasting information directly from the table.

The really big news is that Lulu is currently the only platform providing this type of document support – all absolutely free.  Compare this with other services that can cost upwards of $400 per conversion.

What’s Next? 

We’re always looking for ways to make our great self-publishing tools even better and more accessible to everyone.  We love hearing your feedback, and work continues to provide support for all the items that matter to our authors and our readers.  Check back for more Lulu news in the coming weeks.

Fifty Shades of Grey on the Today Show

Success in publishing happens everyday, but what about for small to medium publishers?  Even they are empowered to expand their brands and imprints with the new tools and innovations self-publishing brings.  Why just this morning Fifty Shades of Grey was featured on the Today Show. Check out the full segment below:


Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

eBooks Made Easy with New Lulu Free EPUB Converter and eBook Publishing Tools

Today is a big day.

Today, Lulu officially launched the Lulu EPUB Converter and eBook Creator Guide – thus helping to simplify the complex process of turning your brilliant work from popular word processing formats, such as a Word document, into sellable EPUBs, the most widely adopted format used by eReaders – absolutely free.

So how is it different?

The Lulu EPUB Converter is unique in that it not only converts but also automatically fixes many pesky errors including accepted fonts and extra spacing. This is the highest level of automation available anywhere.

What does this mean for you?

For you, oh faithful Lulu creator, this means getting your work into popular eBook retail channels is easier and just in time to give you an edge this holiday season and sell your remarkable works electronically while earning more on eBooks than anywhere else with our new industry-best 90/10 revenue split (limited time offer through January 31, 2012).

As part of this initiative, Lulu has secured partnerships with Apple and Barnes and Noble so you can sell your works to millions of readers on devices like the iPad® and NOOK, not to mention in print on Amazon.com and the Lulu Marketplace.  We’ve even added a new Manage Distribution page that lets you opt-in and opt-out of retail channels for all your titles with the click of a button.

With our step-by-step eBook Creator Guide, you can be sure your customers are getting the most robust experience reading your work too.  All of these new tools, resources, and features can be found on Lulu’s new eBook Landing page – your source for all things eBooks.

Don’t forget to explore all your print book options too, and publish the way you, and your readers, want this holiday.

Which Distribution Channels are Right for You?

Lulu offers so many great options for getting your book out in the world, how do you know which ones are right for you?

With both print and eBook distribution, you have the option of selling on Lulu only or through one of Lulu’s retail partners. It is important to note that our partners do have certain requirements for distribution. If your book does not meet these requirements, you can still sell it on the Lulu Marketplace. Selling on Lulu is a great option if you have a specialized market that you can send right to Lulu.  Lulu-only distribution is perfect for projects like school fundraisers, church cookbooks, family genealogies, etc.  Lulu only distribution also works if you’re just starting out and getting a feel for how to market and sell your book.

Print books can also be sold through two additional channels using extendedREACH, which is a free service, or GlobalREACH at a cost of $75. ExtendedREACH gets your book on Amazon.com only, whereas GlobalREACH will get your book on Amazon.com, Barnesandnoble.com, and in Ingram’s database.

ExtendedREACH is free, so if your book meets all distribution requirements  – go for it! It will get your book in an additional location for some extra visibility.

GlobalREACH may be a little extra, but it’s worth every penny. With a listing in Ingram’s database, bookstores will be able to order the book if it is requested. If you have an eBook version of your book, you can have both your print and eBook version listed on barnesandnoble.com.

Through our eBook distribution channels, you can distribute to Lulu, the iBookstore (SM), and Barnes and Noble’s NOOK.  Both of these channels are excellent places for your eBook to be seen – and read! Learn more by visiting our new eBook landing page.