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Lulu Sales Rank: 90253
2 People Reviewed This Product
  • By Janis L Gilmore
    Aug 16, 2005
    "Re: Making My Way by Joan Castro" I wanted to order a Lulu book to see the quality. Since I was ordering one, randomly, I thought I would try to find something of interest to me. I don't remember what search terms I entered, but this was one of the books that popped up. I can't tell you how much I enjoyed it. I am a bit of a WWII buff, so that part appealed to me. Beyond that, the author evolved from her pre-set social class and intellectual boundaries to take on the world. She was (is, I imagine) a real independent spirit. I completely liked this book, and heartily recommend it.
  • By Elizabeth Shultis
    Jan 16, 2005
    "Making My Way by Joan Castro" Joan Hennesy Castro was born in April 1926, the same month and year of my birth. No matter that we were born on opposite sides of the Atlantic, her Memoir, Making My Way, is a rich chronicle of our time. Each page elicits the familiar as feelings come alive of what it was like growing up in pre-World War II days, the war years themselves, followed by post-war adulthood. Granted that American adolescents like myself had no direct experience with “the blitz” and being evacuated from London, the bond of adolescent feelings and thoughts toward family, country and the will to overcome the Nazi scourge, were common to us all.. What contemporary of ours throughout the world does not identify with Anne Frank’s Diary? . Joan Hennesy grew up in London in a multi-generational house hold with parents and grand parents and eventually a much younger sister until, at the age of 14, her school was closed because of the bombings in London. Intent on completing... More > her commercial business course, Joan persuaded her parents to let her become part of the evacuation migration to outlying districts in England so that she could continue her studies. Like a Dickens novel, her initial placement in a forbidding household was changed only when Joan demonstrated a good bit of gumption by complaining to one of the administrators in charge of the school program. She and her housemates were rescued and sent on to happier households. Joan describes her new evacuation setting as a turning point in her life, as she settled in with a highly educated couple who became role models for English diction, as well as introducing Joan to their library of literary classics. Not immune to wartime privations, the couple ran a tearoom and Joan became a partner in that endeavor. The Memoir is a compelling narrative of a young girl’s growth in age and character as obstacles are overcome. And it is told without the author getting in the way. Following the end of World Ward II, I found that our paths ran parallel on many occasions as travel and jobs for rebuilding Europe opened up. Joan tells of having to unlearn British spelling and learn American spelling as well as U.S. Army format when she obtained a job at Allied Forces Central Europe in Fontainebleau, France. Through her work with Americans there, the author eventually sailed to America where she married and raised a family. Now retired in New Hampshire after many years in the New York Metropolitan area, Joan has recently overcome another hurdle by obtaining a driver’s license for the first time. “I only wrote these memoirs for my family,” says Joan, but as readers ask for more, who knows what new possibilities will spring up along her way. Elizabeth C. Shultis Retired editor, journalist and published author...< Less
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Product Details

October 11, 2008
Perfect-bound Paperback
Interior Ink
Black & white
0.66 lbs.
Dimensions (inches)
6 wide x 9 tall
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