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Real World

eBook (PDF), 203 Pages
(4 Ratings)
Price: $1.58
Kirsty and Amanda are both 25. Kirsty is finishing a History degree, whilst bringing up her son Mark. As part of the research for her dissertation she interviews Jake, 53, who was a printer on the Scottish Daily News (A national newspaper run by 500 sacked printers, with a bit of help from Tony Benn, in 1975) / Jake was involved in the radical politics of the ‘70s – squatting, gender politics, and, via his lover Rhona, was influenced by the Italian autonomists, Angry Brigade, etc / Amanda starts off working at Gap, then moves from Charity Mugger, via actress and lingerie model, to being a lap dancer – the ultimate service industry. / By following her story it becomes clear that a service industry job doesn’t just take up your time – it gets right inside you and scoops out any kind of authentic response / Bleak stuff… but on the other hand, Kirsty’s growing career as a jazz-singer proves that, despite the mundane irritations of the showbiz... More > world, it is still possible to ‘sing your own song’.< Less
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5 People Reviewed This Product
  • By Mick Parkin
    Aug 6, 2011
    Reviews by prominent feminists..... GAIL DINES - Author of "Pornoland" - http://gaildines.com/....."A great book, that really capture the horror of porn. The way Kirsty responds was very nuanced, and the style is not at all preachy.".....JULIE BINDEL - Journalist - http://www.guardian.co.uk/profile/juliebindel....."I really like this book. In fact, there was one bit - where a group of jaded lap-dancers were talking - when I couldn't believe such authentic dialogue was written by a man."
  • By Kirsty Meary
    Apr 25, 2010
    "Highly Recommended" The use of imagery is spot-on – metaphors are poignant yet succinct, making their mark without drowning the reader in too many unnecessary words and ideas. Dialogue between characters is another highlight - funny, charming, and above all realistic, which can prove a problem in many pieces of writing. The characters own their words, instead of the dialogue falling behind or jumping ahead of their respective personae. The setting is evoked very well. Those familiar with the Glasgow landscape will enjoy recognizing features they know, whilst those who've never been are more than able to build up a coherent picture from diligent and faithful descriptions. Parkin has a keen eye for the inconsistencies inherent in Glasgow’s social scenes – one such example unfolds at a burlesque event, in which the outward claims to class and glamour quickly fall away to reveal yet more commercialised and derivative attempts to dress sex as entertainment with yet more tawdry... More > ubiquities. This is one scene among many which illustrate the running thematic questions – how far is too far, in the exchange of sex for money? Characters are very well illustrated using a nice mix of authorial descriptions, bald facts, their own inner dialogues and their spoken words. It's a lovely read, Parkin has created a credibly inhabitable world of people, places, action, speech and thought which shapes a worthwhile and pleasurable narrative.< Less
  • By Vivian Gee
    Apr 25, 2010
    Not working in the service industry myself, Real World was an eye opener for me. The different psychologies used by employers, whether it be in Gap or as a "Chugger", is fascinating. Mick Parkin kept me enthralled in these chapters, so much so that I found myself venturing into the nearest Gap just to mess up their shelves to witness the reaction. Mick writes from a female perspective very well, he brings his characters alive on the page and as a reader I cared what happened to Kirsty and Amanda. He shows us that the fine line between the service industry and prostitution doesn't exist. The two are one and the same. I found the character Jake harder to read. He was as believable, but I felt that there was too much political back story that went over my head. That probably says more about me than the writer though. Overall I found Real World to be an enjoyable read and at points I couldn't put it down. I feel this book is even more pertinent now with the amount of people... More > having to get jobs that make do rather than the careers that they want and these people aren't just the faceless, nameless millions, they are your friends and neighbours, they are you and they are me. It's kind of scary. I thoroughly recommend this book< Less
  • By Viv Gee
    Oct 15, 2009
    "Real World" Not working in the service industry myself, Real World was an eye opener for me. The different psychologies used by employers, whether it be in Gap or as a "Chugger", is fascinating. Mick Parkin kept me enthralled in these chapters, so much so that I found myself venturing into the nearest Gap just to mess up their shelves to witness the reaction. Mick writes from a female perspective very well, he brings his characters alive on the page and as a reader I cared what happened to Kirsty and Amanda. He shows us that the fine line between the service industry and prostitution doesn't exist. The two are one and the same. I found the character Jake harder to read. He was believable but I felt that there was too much political back story that went over my head. That probably says more about me than the writer though. Overall I found Real World to be an enjoyable read and at points I couldn't put it down. I feel this book is even more pertinent now with the... More > amount of people having to get jobs that make do rather than the careers that they want and these people aren't just the faceless, nameless millions, they are your friends and neighbours, they are you and they are me. It's kind of scary. I thoroughly recommend this book.< Less
  • By Kirsty Neary
    Dec 31, 1969
    "Highly Recommended" The use of imagery is spot-on – metaphors are poignant yet succinct, making their mark without drowning the reader in too many unnecessary words and ideas. Dialogue between characters is another highlight - funny, charming, and above all realistic, which can prove a problem in many pieces of writing. The characters own their words, instead of the dialogue falling behind or jumping ahead of their respective personae. The setting is evoked very well. Those familiar with the Glasgow landscape will enjoy recognizing features they know, whilst those who've never been are more than able to build up a coherent picture from diligent and faithful descriptions. Parkin has a keen eye for the inconsistencies inherent in Glasgow’s social scenes – one such example unfolds at a burlesque event, in which the outward claims to class and glamour quickly fall away to reveal yet more commercialised and derivative attempts to dress sex as entertainment with yet more tawdry... More > ubiquities. This is one scene among many which illustrate the running thematic questions – how far is too far, in the exchange of sex for money? Characters are very well illustrated using a nice mix of authorial descriptions, bald facts, their own inner dialogues and their spoken words. It's a lovely read, Parkin has created a credibly inhabitable world of people, places, action, speech and thought which shapes a worthwhile and pleasurable narrative.< Less
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Product Details

Published
September 29, 2011
Language
English
Pages
203
File Format
PDF
File Size
939.2 KB
Product ID
17428739

Formats for this Ebook

PDF
Required Software Any PDF Reader, Apple Preview
Supported Devices Windows PC/PocketPC, Mac OS, Linux OS, Apple iPhone/iPod Touch... (See More)
# of Devices Unlimited
Flowing Text / Pages Pages
Printable? Yes
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