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Menexenus

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Menexenus
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The Menexenus is a Socratic dialogue of Plato. The speakers are Socrates and Menexenus, who is not to be confused with Socrates' son Menexenus. The Menexenus consists mainly of a lengthy funeral oration, satirizing the one given by Pericles in Thucydides' account of the Peloponnesian War. Socrates here delivers to Menexenus a speech that he claims to have learned from Aspasia, a consort of Pericles and prominent female Athenian intellectual. Menexenus is unique among the Platonic dialogues in that the actual 'dialogue' serves primarily as exposition for the oration. For this reason, perhaps, the Menexenus has come under some suspicion of illegitimacy, although Aristotle's invocation of the text on multiple occasions seems to reinforce its authenticity. Much of the interest in the Menexenus stems from the fact that it is one of the few extant sources on the practice of Athenian funeral oratory, even though it parodies the medium.
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Product Details

ISBN
9781291549904
Edition
First Edition
Published
September 5, 2013
Language
English
File Format
ePub
File Size
26.72 KB

Formats for this Ebook

ePub
Required Software Any ePub Reader
Supported Devices Windows PC/PocketPC, Mac OS, Linux OS, Apple iPhone/iPod Touch... (See More)
# of Devices Unlimited
Flowing Text / Pages Flowing Text
Printable? Yes
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Keywords

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More From Plato , Benjamin Jowett, Platon