Shop

Ratings & Reviews

Log in to review this item
1 Person Reviewed This Product
  • By crcandkili
    Aug 28, 2009
    "A vivid account of special interest" Following a comprehensive introduction, the scene is set by Rev. Herbert Clayton who went to Uganda with CMS (the Church Missionary Society) in 1896 and five years later wrote an entertaining article describing a typical week in the life of his remote mission station in Koki, a district in the kingdom of Buganda. We are then treated to some fascinating extracts from his letters home, describing how he and his old college friend, Rev. John Willis (later Bishop), set off on foot, complete with porters and cows, into the ‘heathen’ kingdom of Ankole, where the two of them built themselves a house and, assisted by Baganda catechists, set about teaching the king and his people to read and understand the Gospels. Four months later they did a three week return trek to Kabarole in Toro to meet Maddox and Fisher, the CMS representatives there, and to discuss problems of language and translation. Also there was the young deacon, Apolo Kivebulaya,... More > who was later to do extraordinary evangelistic work across the border in the Belgian Congo, spreading his strong Christian faith and sending converted young men out to teach and found Christian communities and build small churches in outlying districts. Thirty two years later Dorothy Clayton, Herbert’s daughter, went as a CMS teacher to Toro Girls School in Kabarole. She very soon found herself in sole charge of girl’s education in Toro, requiring close liaison with the colonial government, which wished to see both the highest standards maintained and the rapid establishment of a national network of schools. She writes vivid accounts of her life and her work at Toro Girls’ School and also of her visits, often on foot with guide, tent and porters, to the many bush schools staffed by her teachers trained at Kabarole. Her love of nature and the Toro countryside is always apparent, as is her concern for the welfare of the people around her. Meanwhile, following the death of Apolo in May 1933, CMS selected Rev. Reginald Palin for the difficult task of consolidating his work based at Mboga in the Congo, coordinating the many Christian communities of varying cultures and languages into one cohesive Church capable of survival, self-financing and eventual self-management. Reg’s diaries document in great and sometimes daily detail the early growth of the Anglican church in the Belgian Congo, recording every move, every foot-safari, the places, distances, names of evangelists, teachers, trainees, numbers of baptisms and confirmations from an era where probably no such information now exists. At that time he was the only ordained Anglican priest in the Congo which today, in spite of all the war and violence in recent years, has a national Church with eight dioceses and tens of thousands of members. Following marriage to Dorothy and with war threatening Reg was recalled to Uganda in 1939 as Rural Dean of Toro and later, additionally, Bunyoro. His detailed diaries continue, including a unique and surprising account of misunderstandings and setbacks which occurred during the early spread of the East African Revival movement which could so easily have fragmented Christianity in Uganda. His diaries cease in 1943, but he continued to have a distinguished career, becoming Archdeacon of Uganda in 1950 and first Provincial Secretary of the newly created autonomous Church of Uganda in 1962. This book will appeal to descendants of the Clayton/Palin families and of their many friends and CMS Colleagues of the era … plus Church historians and those interested in the ‘East African Revival’ … plus everyone everywhere, both Christian and non-Christian, who enjoy reading personal accounts of human endeavour. Christopher L Carey< Less
Refreshing...
There are no reviews for previous versions of this product
Refreshing...

Product Details

Edition
Second Edition
Publisher
The Palin Family
Published
December 14, 2010
Language
English
Pages
592
Binding
Hardcover (dust-jacket)
Interior Ink
Black & white
Weight
1.89 lbs.
Dimensions (inches)
6 wide x 9 tall
Report This Content to Lulu >

Moderation of Questionable Content

Thank you for your interest in helping us moderate questionable content on Lulu. If you need assistance with an order or the publishing process, please contact our support team directly.

How does this content violate the Lulu Membership Agreement?