Search Results: ''

Search

×
×
×
×
6 results for ""
Dancing About Architecture By Guy Bigland
Paperback: $47.19
Ships in 3-5 business days
The origin of the phrase ‘Writing about music is like dancing about Architecture’ has been the subject of much discussion and has been attributed to various people. Current evidence... More > points to American actor, musician and painter, Martin Mull (b.1943) as the first to use the dictum in the public sphere. However, he does not claim to have originated it, but to have borrowed it from a story he once heard. Research has found that as far back as 1918 a similar form appeared in New Republic; ‘writing about music is as illogical as singing about economics’.< Less
Offs By Guy Bigland
Paperback: $15.01
Ships in 3-5 business days
A collection of words that are commonly suffixed with the word 'off'
AA TO ZZ By Guy Bigland
Paperback: $19.35
Ships in 3-5 business days
All possible two-letter combinations of all the letters of the alphabet
KN NK By Guy Bigland
Paperback: $30.26
Ships in 3-5 business days
This book uses a formula to create palindromic permutations that generate 260 different four letter words. Printed with one word on each page.
All the Four Letter Words IV By Guy Bigland
Paperback: $53.82
Ships in 3-5 business days
A collection of four-letter words that are sometimes used with another four-letter word. Initially gathered as pairs, each four letter word was then separated from its partner and placed in... More > alphabetical order, one word per page, creating a juxtaposition with a new word dictated by the alphabetical ordering. This taxonomy imposes a structure upon the familiar to create unfamiliar new arrangements.< Less
Lineman By Guy Bigland
Paperback: $22.00
Ships in 3-5 business days
This book takes two lines from a song (Wichita Lineman written by Jimmy Webb), 12 words in total, and presents them rearranged into all possible permutations, most of which are grammatically... More > incorrect but nonetheless appear to carry meaning. Wichita Lineman was recorded by Glen Campbell reaching #3 on the U.S. pop chart in 1968 and remaining in the Top 100 for 15 weeks. Webb's inspiration for the lyrics came while driving through Washita County in rural southwestern Oklahoma. At that time, many telephone companies were county-owned utilities and their linemen were county employees. Heading westward on a straight road into the setting sun, Webb drove past a seemingly endless line of telephone poles, each looking exactly the same as the last. Then, in the distance, he noticed the silhouette of a solitary lineman atop a pole. He described it as "the picture of loneliness."< Less