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OTREC-RR-12-13 By Kelly Clifton, Kristina Currans, Christopher Muhs
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This study examines how urban context affects vehicle trip-generation for a variety of land uses. A survey was administered at 78 restaurants, convenience stores, and drinking establishments. ... More > Results show vehicle-trips decrease in urban neighborhoods. Comparison with ITE trip-generation rates indicates a need for local adjustment for convenience stores and drinking establishments. While restaurants are well predicted by the ITE method, vehicle-trip rate adjustment match observed patterns more closely. A model was developed using the Urban Living Infrastructure (ULI) score from the Metro Context Tool. It has a good statistical fit and is easy to use in evaluating new development. The model is useful in planning as it relates to other built-environment measures. Study findings are limited in several ways. Work planned for the future includes validation of the method using data from additional sites, and analysis of such attributes as parking, building orientation and pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure.< Less
OTREC-RR-12-13 By Kelly Clifton, Kristina Currans, Christopher Muhs
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This study examines how urban context affects vehicle trip-generation for a variety of land uses. A survey was administered at 78 restaurants, convenience stores, and drinking establishments. ... More > Results show vehicle-trips decrease in urban neighborhoods. Comparison with ITE trip-generation rates indicates a need for local adjustment for convenience stores and drinking establishments. While restaurants are well predicted by the ITE method, vehicle-trip rate adjustment match observed patterns more closely. A model was developed using the Urban Living Infrastructure (ULI) score from the Metro Context Tool. It has a good statistical fit and is easy to use in evaluating new development. The model is useful in planning as it relates to other built-environment measures. Study findings are limited in several ways. Work planned for the future includes validation of the method using data from additional sites, and analysis of such attributes as parking, building orientation and pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure.< Less
OTREC-RR-12-15 By Kristina Currans et al.
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This study examines the impacts of multimodal transportation on local businesses. Analysis of travel choices and consumer spending shows important differences in the average amounts spent by travel... More > mode. Bicyclists, pedestrians and transit riders are competitive consumers. Mode choice does not significantly impact consumer spending at establishments surveyed when we consider demographics and socioeconomics. When controlling for trip frequency, average monthly expenditures by mode reveal that bicyclists, transit users and pedestrians are competitive consumers and, for all businesses except supermarkets, spend more on average than those who drive. Residential and employment density, proximity to rail transit, and the amount of car and bicycle parking are all important in explaining the use of non-automobile modes. Bike parking and bike corrals are significant predictors of bike mode share at an establishment.< Less
OTREC-RR-12-15 By Kristina Currans et al.
eBook (PDF): $0.00
Download immediately.
This study examines the impacts of multimodal transportation on local businesses. Analysis of travel choices and consumer spending shows important differences in the average amounts spent by travel... More > mode. Bicyclists, pedestrians and transit riders are competitive consumers. Mode choice does not significantly impact consumer spending at establishments surveyed when we consider demographics and socioeconomics. When controlling for trip frequency, average monthly expenditures by mode reveal that bicyclists, transit users and pedestrians are competitive consumers and, for all businesses except supermarkets, spend more on average than those who drive. Residential and employment density, proximity to rail transit, and the amount of car and bicycle parking are all important in explaining the use of non-automobile modes. Bike parking and bike corrals are significant predictors of bike mode share at an establishment.< Less