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Salt Spring Trace and Other Pioneer Era Roads on Lower Howard’s Creek, Clark County, Kentucky By Harry G. Enoch
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One of the earliest roads in Kentucky led from Fort Boonesborough to a prime hunting location known as the Lower Blue Licks, or the Lower Salt Spring. Salt licks attracted buffalo in large numbers... More > and were favored spots for hunters. Licks also provided a valuable source of salt that was critical for preserving meat. In 1775, Kentucky’s settlement year, the hunters at Boonesborough discovered the Lower Blue Licks by following a series of connected buffalo traces. The path crossed the river near Boonesborough and went up Lower Howard’s Creek in present-day Clark County. There it traverses the Lower Howard’s Creek Nature & Heritage Preserve. This report describes the history and geography of the Salt Spring Trace, as well as other early roads in the Preserve.< Less
Indian Old Fields By Harry G. Enoch
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Over 50 significant prehistoric and historic archaeological sites have been identified in the Indian Old Fields area of Clark County, Kentucky. These date from 8000 B.C. to A.D. 1800. Several of... More > these sites are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Indian Old Fields was the one-time home of Shawnee chief Catahecassa (Black Hoof), the reputed site of John Finley’s trading post, as well as Eskippakithiki, one of the last Indian towns in what is now Kentucky. Pioneers who explored the Indian Old Fields area in 1775 reported evidence of old buildings, Indian fortifications, mounds and extensive areas that had been cultivated, which they took to be corn fields. These pioneers gave sworn statements about what they saw and directed the locations to be laid down by survey. They testified that a place they called the “gateposts” appeared to have been the area most recently occupied by the Indians.< Less
John Howard of Howard's Creek: Biography of a Kentucky Pioneer By Harry G. Enoch
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During his visit to the western country from Virginia in 1775, John Howard staked out land claims on two tributaries of the Kentucky River—one a few miles upstream from Fort Boonesborough, the... More > other just downstream from the fort. These tributaries came to be known as Upper Howard’s Creek and Lower Howard’s Creek. John Howard, the pioneer who gave his name to these Clark County creeks, later settled near Lexington in Fayette County and died there at the age of 103. His home place, the plantation known as “Howard’s Grove,” was located on the now-legendary Gainesway Farm. 74 pp., illus., indexed< Less
Where In The World? By Harry G. Enoch
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Unusual place names evoke a sense of mystery and wonder. How did a place come to be called “Barefoot” or “Battle Row”? Where in the world were the “Sycamore... More > Forest” and “Blue Ball”? Researching these names often reveals fascinating stories about local history, families, events, and politics. Clark County, Kentucky is blessed with many such interesting places. The articles in this book are collected from a column in the Winchester Sun called “Where in the World?” Each article describes an historic place name in Clark County, some well known, some not so well known. The articles were written for the Bluegrass Heritage Museum in hopes of fostering an interest in local history and the museum. This book is intended to do the same. This work includes one hundred articles that appeared in the newspaper between January 6, 2005 and August 23, 2007. A few of the articles were updated for this publication when additional information became available.< Less
Historical Records of the Enoch Family in Virginia and Pennsylvania By Harry G. Enoch
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Brothers Henry Enoch and Enoch Enoch came to Virginia before 1750, settling on the sparsely populated frontier west of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Their Virginia years were defined by the French and... More > Indian War (1755-1763) and their close association with young George Washington. By 1757, their children had begun to explore more westerly lands, where they ultimately resettled with their families in what is now Washington County, Pennsylvania. Henry Jr., David, and Enoch Enoch were among the first “over the mountain men,” settling west of the Allegheny Mountains by 1767. Their Pennsylvania years were defined by the Revolutionary War (1775-1783) and the Indian Wars (1786-1795). By the turn of the century, the Enochs began looking west again, this time to the more promising lands of Ohio.< Less
Bound for New Orleans! John Halley’s Journal of Flatboat Trips from Boonesborough in 1789 & 1791 By Harry G. Enoch
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John Halley’s journals provide the earliest first-hand accounts of the voyage down the Kentucky, Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans. Halley supplies insightful accounts of what became... More > one of Kentucky’s major early industries—shipping goods and produce by flatboat to the port of New Orleans—and he does so almost at the birth of that industry, just two years after Gen. James Wilkinson’s inaugural trip in 1787. Although rivermen often suffered at the hands of Native Americans and Spanish officials, Halley seems to have gotten along well with everyone he met. He describes every encounter and tells of shooting the rapids at the Falls of Ohio (Louisville), getting stuck on a sandbar, breaking his steering oar, almost losing one of the men in a pile of driftwood, and many other adventures. He was a keen observer and comments on hunting and fishing along the way, local flora and fauna, weather and river conditions, settlements, and notable landmarks. 52 pp, illustrated< Less
History of Weddle’s Mill And Other Old Mills Located Near Doylesville on Muddy Creek In Madison County, Kentucky By Harry G. Enoch
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George Weddle operated a gristmill on Muddy Creek from the early to mid-1800s. The mill stood about two miles from the Kentucky River, near the road from Richmond to Jackson’s Ferry. The... More > establishment played a prominent role in the local community for nearly a century. The gristmill produced flour and cornmeal for nearby farmers, as well as for a distillery, and a stagecoach stop brought travelers by the tavern to sample the house whiskey. The mill was a county landmark until it was destroyed by a fire in 1971. Several concerns operated at the site at various times, including Douglas’ Mill, Weddle’s Mill, Walden’s Distillery, Ogg’s Mill and Griggs’ Mill. Cassius Marcellus Clay, that most colorful member of Kentucky’s most illustrious family, owned the mill for sixteen years. 54 pp.< Less
History of the Kerr Building and Eclipse Mills, Winchester, Kentucky By Harry G. Enoch
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The Kerr Building encompasses two separate buildings: the S. P. Kerr Business Block and the Eclipse Mills. George Taylor and Leslie Webster put up the Eclipse Mills in about 1867. Smith Kerr... More > erected the Business Block in 1889. After serving as a prominent business house in Winchester for over a century, in the late 1990s the Kerr Building fell into disrepair and was in danger of being razed. The Blue Grass Trust for Historic Preservation placed the Kerr Building on its 1999 list of most endangered buildings in the region, what it called “11 in their 11th hour.” Mayor Dodd Dixon, deciding something needed to be done, obtained two grants from Renaissance Kentucky totaling $500,000. Mark Bailey & Associates of Louisville purchased the building, restored the exterior and renovated the interior for commercial space on the ground floor and senior citizen housing above. 70 pp, illustrated< Less
John Enoch's Mill, West Liberty, Ohio By Harry G. Enoch
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John Enoch (1774-1831) is credited as the founder of West Liberty in Logan County, Ohio. He was born in Redstone Old Fort, Pennsylvania, in 1774 and came to Ohio with his parents, David and Nancy... More > Enoch, in about 1802. John moved to Champaign County and settled on the Mad River. The area later became Logan County. It was here that John built his mill and started the town. This work is a brief history of the gristmill John Enoch built in West Liberty. The information was gleaned from various published articles and books, as well as unpublished Enoch family papers.< Less
Family History of George and William Redmon of Pennsylvania and Kentucky By Harry G. Enoch
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This history of George and William Redmon presents evidence for the Virginia origin of the Redmon family of Kentucky and for the military service of George and William during the Revolutionary War. ... More > It also establishes a connection between the Redmons from the counties of Bourbon, Clark, Harrison, and Montgomery by providing proof that the progenitors of these families, George and William Redmon, were brothers who settled on Flat Run in Bourbon County in about 1786. Finally, it lays out the family record of the descendants of George and William Redmon compiled from a variety of documents. The most valuable sources for this purpose have been census data, cemetery records, county marriage records, Kentucky vital statistics (birth and death indexes) and newspaper obituaries.< Less