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Russia’s Agony By Robert Wilton
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The London Times’ correspondent in Russia provided the first western eyewitness account of the monumental events which resulted in the creation of the Soviet Union. Wilton provides a full... More > historical background and the disastrous course of World War One for Russia, which sets the scene for the seizure of power by the Bolsheviks. He then details the Red Terror’s full enormity, and ends with the optimistic—and incorrect—hope that Bolshevism would be short-lived. Although Wilton’s credentials were impeccable and his status unchallenged, this book was blacklisted because he dared to report openly on the overwhelming number of Jews amongst the Communist revolutionaries. “I reported from Riga on the pernicious influence of Jewish Extremists. But this appeal to moderation was willfully distorted by the Jewish Press. Facts cited by me on the best authority were “proved” to be non-existent, and a campaign of slander and intimidation followed. Now, I was threatened with nothing less than murder.”< Less
The Last Days of the Romanovs By Robert Wilton
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A dramatic, accurate and complete account of the murder of Russia’s Imperial Family by the Communists in 1918 at the height of the Russian Civil War which followed the Bolshevik seizure of... More > power. Written by the London Times’ correspondent in Russia, this book was told not only the true story of how the Bolsheviks had come to power, but who was behind the phenomenon: an international clique of extreme Communist Jews. Wilton detailed the cold-blooded murder of the last Tsar, his wife, four daughters, son, physician, three servants and little pet dog by the Soviet secret police in Ekaterinberg, Siberia, under the leadership of local Jewish Communist Yakov Yurovsky, and then goes on to list the Jewish origin of 17 among 22 members of the Council of People’s Commissars, of 23 among the 36-member Cheka (secret police), and 41 among the 62-member Soviet Central Executive Committee.< Less