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the allegrezza ficcione By Mark Young
Paperback: $14.90
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"I admire this book and not just because I wish I wrote it. I admire it because I am glad I read it. Not only is it an enjoyable romp which extends modernism but, as great literature often... More > effects in its readers who happen to be writers, it raises the bar for me in my own attempts to write the novel in a fresh way. The effects of blogging on literature are obviously still being written. Mark Young's the allegrezza ficcione is undisputably one which will reflect how history, poetry, speculative fiction and magical realism were alchemized into something differently-modern through the existence of poetry blogland and the internet. That’s right — you heard it here first: Mark Young’s the allegrezza ficcione is historic and will come to be considered a 21st century classic." — Eileen Tabios< Less
The Codicils By Mark Young
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MARK YOUNG's "The Codicils" is actually a number of new books, nine at least, covering his poetry in the years since the publication of "Pelican Dreaming: Poems 1959-2008." It... More > revisits some familiar themes — Magritte, geographies, that peripatectic Postman — but it also brings in a number of new streams & memes, & includes an important essay by the poet on the universality of the stochastic methodology that lies behind his poetic canon.< Less
Falsely Goethe By Mark Young
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Mark Young has Faustian daydreams, but they keep on being interrupted by the postman.
Falsely Goethe By Mark Young
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Mark Young has Faustian daydreams, but they keep on being interrupted by the postman.
Genji Monogatari By Mark Young
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Genji Monogatari is a sequence of 54 poems, each keyed to a chapter of the 11th century Japanese classic by Murasaki Shikibu. The result is a complex and beautiful palimpsest, wherein we are... More > privileged, simultaneously and sequentially, to look upon worlds within worlds within worlds. Mark Young opens the book on the processes of the composition of the sequence itself so that, along with his reading of Genji, we are also given the progress of the writing of that reading. His technique, foregrounded here, demonstrates a fidelity to stochastics allied with a profound knowledge of, and respect for, tradition: "replaying / our cached millennium." All the characteristics of Young’s recent work—ferocious intellect, coruscating satire, black humour, exquisite emotion—are fully present, along with something difficult to name: as if, in the drawing back of screen after screen after screen, what is revealed is the nakedness of all enclosure, the silence inside both world and word. —Martin Edmond< Less