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GNOSOS By Sreshta Premnath
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Gnosis (from the Latin gnosos meaning "knowledge" and nosos meaning "disease") is an intriguing meditation on the subjectivity of perception. Composed by artist Sreshta Rit... More > Premnath, it consists of eight collaged silhouettes accompanied by two found texts: a 19th century clinical description of the neurological condition anosognosia and a list of CIA counterintelligence categories used in the interrogation of suspects.< Less
Shifter 5 : Desire and the Other By Sreshta Premnath
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Participants: Caleb Larsen, Matthew Bollinger, Barbara Jane Reyes, Alison O'Daniel, Sue Havens, Jason Yoh, Ana Prvacki, Crispin Webb, Baron, Benjamin Grasso // Editor: Sreshta Rit Premnath //... More > www.shifter-magazine.com< Less
Shifter 10 : Transparent White By Sreshta Premnath
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Shifter is a topical magazine edited by Sreshta / Rit Premnath. As the name suggests, Shifter’s topics have often focused on issues of subjectivity and rupture in language, and contributions... More > reveal an equal emphasis on visual and textual strategies. Each issue creates a community of artists and writers who may or may not have seen each other’s work contextualized together, and opens a dialogue amongst them. Shifter 10 includes contributions by Eric Anglès, Kathleen Miller + Clifford Borress, Joseph Bradshaw, Mark Cooley Melissa Dubbin + Aaron S. Davidson, Eric Gottesman, Branden Koch, Reuben Lorch-Miller, Matthew McAlpin, Kiki Petrosino, André Spears, Christopher Stackhouse, David Samuel Stern, Edwin Torres, Genya Turovskaya, Avinash Veeraraghavan and Ruben Verdu.< Less
Shifter 11 : Intimate By Sreshta Premnath, Steven Lam
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Shifter is a topical magazine that was founded in 2004 by Sreshta Premnath. The 11th issue "Intimate" is co-edited by Steven Lam. Here we ask How artists, theorists, writers, etc., can... More > remap a new thinking of intimacy pushing it away from a private emotional ideal frequently narrativized in consumer culture to a zone that seems capable of addressing our time of social upheaval marked by hatred, fanaticism, war, vulnerability, estrangement, and immobility? The participants in Shifter 11 : Intimate are Dorothy Albertini, Avi Alpert, Steve Ausbury, Jonah Bokaer, Karen Cunningham, Dorit Cypis, Elaine Gan, Stephan Hillerbrand, Mary Magsamen, Erin Ming Lee, Simon Leung, Matt Lipps, Chana Morgenstern, Sudha Premnath, C Premnath, Megan Piontkowski, Sarah Ross, Ann Stephenson, Anup Matthew Thomas and Soyoung Yoon.< Less
Shifter 12 : Unassigned By Sreshta Premnath, Kajsa Dahlberg, Jane Jin Kaisen
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Most libraries around the world use the Dewey Decimal Classification System (DDCS) to list and categorize books. It was an attempt to organize all knowledge into ten main classes, which are further... More > subdivided into 100 divisions and 1000 sections. This makes the DDCS appear purely numerical and infinitely rational. However, DDCS is regularly revised, reflecting how culture, ideology, and the perception of knowledge change over time. As a result of these changes and to provide for future alterations 89 of the 1000 sections in the system are classified as “ Unassigned.” For this issue of Shifter we invited artists, writers, activists and scholars to comment on, disturb and restructure the logic of this system by adding new categories to fill the unassigned spaces. These comments, reflections, parasite systems or prosthetic extensions all expand on what is structurally “knowable” within the institution of the public library, by opening up the possibilities held within its undefined categories.< Less
Shifter 12 : Unassigned (B/W Edition) By Sreshta Premnath, Kajsa Dahlberg, Jane Jin Kaisen
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Most libraries around the world use the Dewey Decimal Classification System (DDCS) to list and categorize books. It was an attempt to organize all knowledge into ten main classes, which are further... More > subdivided into 100 divisions and 1000 sections. This makes the DDCS appear purely numerical and infinitely rational. However, DDCS is regularly revised, reflecting how culture, ideology, and the perception of knowledge change over time. As a result of these changes and to provide for future alterations 89 of the 1000 sections in the system are classified as “ Unassigned.” For this issue of Shifter we invited artists, writers, activists and scholars to comment on, disturb and restructure the logic of this system by adding new categories to fill the unassigned spaces. These comments, reflections, parasite systems or prosthetic extensions all expand on what is structurally “knowable” within the institution of the public library, by opening up the possibilities held within its undefined categories.< Less