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Shaw Island Poetry Reading By Brian Lynch
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This booklet documents a poetry reading on Shaw Island, Washington, in June of 2013, where four Shaw Island School 7th and 8th Graders (and two teacher/mentors) gave a reading of selected poems... More > (Dickinson, Moore, Plath, Carver, Yeats) and their own work for the Shaw Island community.< Less
Poems From Shaw Island By Brian Lynch
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These poems, for the most part, represent writing done while living on Shaw Island (in the San Juan Islands, Washington) from 2006 through 2007. The first two poems in the collection, Pieces of Shaw... More > and Mood Fog Clearing, were written much earlier, in 1990. Mood Fog Clearing was published by Prune Alley in 1991 (Prune Alley: The Orcas Island Library Literary Quarterly, II(4), 26-7). All the others appear in print for the first time (save the odd appearance on the family website or a personal gift). Most of the work has as its focus an evocation of the spirit of Shaw Island. Some of the poems head off in directions (inward and outward) that leave Shaw far behind, but always find their way back, in spirit, to the unique vision and music which is at the heart of the island.< Less
Circumstance By Brian Lynch
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Hard-to-label poems that range from confessional to political rant. The aim is authenticity, to the point of vulnerability...
Various Gazes By Brian Lynch
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Gazes vary as location, mood, frame of mind, and sense of identity change from day to day (or moment to moment), so my/our gazes take on different characters. In the first section, “In the... More > garden, on the water”, the gazes reflect the natural beauty around us and a range of thoughts and emotions it can conjure. The second section, “In the world, on the streets”, shifts the gaze further outward, looking more at the social and political world and our relations with it. Political poems can become annoyingly pedantic, and I’ve tried to avoid that stance despite some strongly held convictions that will be obvious. The final section, “In memory, at the desk”, shifts the gaze to include both the inward and, in an autobiographical sense, the outer world.< Less