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OTREC-RR-11-15 By Nico Larco
Paperback: $6.60
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Suburban multifamily housing is a commonly overlooked example of density within walking distance of commercial developments. This report focuses on demographics, attitudes, and perceptions related to... More > mode choice at 14 sites in Eugene, Oregon. Our study shows that site design and connectivity are significant predictors of mode choice. 40% of trips to local commercial areas from more-connected developments are by foot or bike, nearly twice the rate from less-connected developments. Active transportation has environmental benefits of reduced gas consumption and green house gas emissions, health benefits of increased exercise, and social benefits of increased independence for youth and the elderly. Quantifying the degree to which site design, and specifically connectivity, makes a difference in residents’ mode choice is a first step to increasing the amount of active transportation. This research provides planners and designers a basis for reevaluating suburban multifamily site design and zoning codes.< Less
Disseminating the Sustainable City Year Program Education Model By Nico Larco
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The University of Oregon has developed a catalytic learning model that simultaneously meets the needs of both the next generation’s transportation workforce and cities looking for innovative... More > and catalytic ways to advance a new era of transportation goals. Named the Sustainable City Year Program (SCYP), the model links local community priorities (as expressed through local plans and city council goals) with courses from a range of disciplines at a nearby university. This NITC technology transfer project assisted in the national dissemination of the SCYP model through a specific set of strategies and resources.< Less
OTREC-RR-10-03 By Nico Larco
Paperback: $6.40
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Suburban Multifamily Housing currently accounts for almost one in four units of housing in suburbia. For primarily transportation-related reasons, this dense housing type is usually located along... More > arterials and adjacent to commercial and retail development, creating a potential model of smart growth in suburbia, but areas are often disconnected and uninviting with barriers that minimize linkages and create auto-dominated development. This study investigates the integration of land use and transportation and focuses on the role of site design as a critical aspect in the creation of livable, less congested and multi-modal suburban communities.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-15 By Nico Larco
eBook (PDF): $0.00
Suburban multifamily housing is a commonly overlooked example of density within walking distance of commercial developments. This report focuses on demographics, attitudes, and perceptions related to... More > mode choice at 14 sites in Eugene, Oregon. Our study shows that site design and connectivity are significant predictors of mode choice. 40% of trips to local commercial areas from more-connected developments are by foot or bike, nearly twice the rate from less-connected developments. Active transportation has environmental benefits of reduced gas consumption and green house gas emissions, health benefits of increased exercise, and social benefits of increased independence for youth and the elderly. Quantifying the degree to which site design, and specifically connectivity, makes a difference in residents’ mode choice is a first step to increasing the amount of active transportation. This research provides planners and designers a basis for reevaluating suburban multifamily site design and zoning codes.< Less
OTREC-RR-10-03 By Nico Larco
eBook (PDF): $0.00
Suburban Multifamily Housing currently accounts for almost one in four units of housing in suburbia. For primarily transportation-related reasons, this dense housing type is usually located along... More > arterials and adjacent to commercial and retail development, creating a potential model of smart growth in suburbia, but areas are often disconnected and uninviting with barriers that minimize linkages and create auto-dominated development. This study investigates the integration of land use and transportation and focuses on the role of site design as a critical aspect in the creation of livable, less congested and multi-modal suburban communities.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-15 By Nico Larco
eBook (PDF): $0.00
Suburban multifamily housing is a commonly overlooked example of density within walking distance of commercial developments. This report focuses on demographics, attitudes, and perceptions related to... More > mode choice at 14 sites in Eugene, Oregon. Our study shows that site design and connectivity are significant predictors of mode choice. 40% of trips to local commercial areas from more-connected developments are by foot or bike, nearly twice the rate from less-connected developments. Active transportation has environmental benefits of reduced gas consumption and green house gas emissions, health benefits of increased exercise, and social benefits of increased independence for youth and the elderly. Quantifying the degree to which site design, and specifically connectivity, makes a difference in residents’ mode choice is a first step to increasing the amount of active transportation. This research provides planners and designers a basis for reevaluating suburban multifamily site design and zoning codes.< Less
OTREC-RR-12-12 By Nico Larco
Paperback: $4.66
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This study looks at travel to suburban commercial strips by residents living within one-third of a mile of the strip, focusing on six sites in Oregon and Georgia. The study mapped pedsheds around... More > these strips and found significant increases in network extents when formal and informal pedestrian paths were added to street centerline data. Informal networks such as paths through vacant land and cuts in fences were widespread and suggest a pent-up demand for route directness. Travel surveys found significant walking and biking in these areas – just over one-third of all trips to the commercial strip – with travel distance and walking along or across arterials affecting mode choice. This suggests network extent and connectivity are factors critical to walking and biking in these areas. Mode choice motivations included convenience, cost, and culture. There was little variation across sites, suggesting that motivations and levels of active travel are fairly consistent across income and geography.< Less
OTREC-RR-12-12 By Nico Larco
eBook (PDF): $0.00
This study looks at travel to suburban commercial strips by residents living within one-third of a mile of the strip, focusing on six sites in Oregon and Georgia. The study mapped pedsheds around... More > these strips and found significant increases in network extents when formal and informal pedestrian paths were added to street centerline data. Informal networks such as paths through vacant land and cuts in fences were widespread and suggest a pent-up demand for route directness. Travel surveys found significant walking and biking in these areas – just over one-third of all trips to the commercial strip – with travel distance and walking along or across arterials affecting mode choice. This suggests network extent and connectivity are factors critical to walking and biking in these areas. Mode choice motivations included convenience, cost, and culture. There was little variation across sites, suggesting that motivations and levels of active travel are fairly consistent across income and geography.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-15 By Nico Larco
eBook (PDF): $0.00
Suburban multifamily housing is a commonly overlooked example of density within walking distance of commercial developments. This report focuses on demographics, attitudes, and perceptions related to... More > mode choice at 14 sites in Eugene, Oregon. Our study shows that site design and connectivity are significant predictors of mode choice. 40% of trips to local commercial areas from more-connected developments are by foot or bike, nearly twice the rate from less-connected developments. Active transportation has environmental benefits of reduced gas consumption and green house gas emissions, health benefits of increased exercise, and social benefits of increased independence for youth and the elderly. Quantifying the degree to which site design, and specifically connectivity, makes a difference in residents’ mode choice is a first step to increasing the amount of active transportation. This research provides planners and designers a basis for reevaluating suburban multifamily site design and zoning codes.< Less
OTREC-TT-09-02 By Marc Schlossberg, Nico Larco
eBook (PDF): $0.00
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