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Oromia and East Africa in the 21st Century: Shifting Paradigms towards Religious and Political Diversity By Mario I. Aguilar
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Keynote address delivered at Howard University, Washington, D.C. on Saturday 31st July 2010 on the occasion of the 24th annual meeting of the Oromo Studies Association of North America.
1968: A historiography of a New Reformation in Latin America By Mario I. Aguilar
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This book explores the ideological, social and religious changes triggered within Latin America at that time and particularly those that were the result of the 1968 meeting of bishops in... More > Medellín, Colombia. That meeting included the papal visit of Paul VI to Colombia (the first papal visit to Latin America), the influential standby for the poor and the marginalized by the Jesuits of Latin America as well as the growing sense of a new process of ‘revolution in freedom’ that was taking place in Chile with the ever-growing support for the socialist project of the president-to-be Salvador Allende.< Less
The Rising of the Dalai Lamas in Tibet: From the First to the Fourth 1391-1617 By Mario I. Aguilar
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This work deals with the development of the Dalai Lamas in Tibet, particularly the early ones associated with the Mongol period: the first, second, third and fourth. The history of the first four... More > Dalai Lamas shows the historical development of the Gelug-pa and the actual connections between an evolving unification of Tibet under the symbolic recognition and military support by the Mongols and their lineages. The religious and political consolidation exercised by the Fifth Dalai Lama was to provide the foundation for the Dalai Lama as a political institution and for Tibet as an independent and autonomous nation unified by a figure that was the incarnation of the Buddha and the political successor to a unified Tibet, at that time still very much isolated from the rest of the world.< Less
Identification of Human Remains (N.N.) at Chihuío (Panguipulli), Chile, July 2011 By Mario I. Aguilar
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On 17 July 2011 the human remains of five people killed by the military at Chihuío in the area of Panguipulli in southern Chile were handed over by Patricia Benhe, regional director of the... More > Servicio Médico Legal (SML) to their relatives in Valdivia. Their identification had been announced on the first of July 2011 by the director of the SML, Patricio Bustos. The fragments of bones corresponded to the human remains of Carlos Maximiliano Acuña Inostroza (46), Luis Arnaldo Ferrada Sandoval (42), Daniel Méndez Méndez (42), Ricardo Segundo Ruiz Rodríguez (24), and Manuel Jesús Sepúlveda Rebolledo (28). They had been killed on 9 October 1973 together with other 12 and they were all workers of the farm and forestry company at Panguipulli; they were organized in a trade union with the name Sindicato Campesino La Esperanza del Obrero of the Complejo Agrícola y Forestal Panguipulli.< Less
1968: A historiography of a New Reformation in Latin America By Mario I. Aguilar
eBook (PDF): $0.00
This book explores the ideological, social and religious changes triggered within Latin America at that time and particularly those that were the result of the 1968 meeting of bishops in... More > Medellín, Colombia. That meeting included the papal visit of Paul VI to Colombia (the first papal visit to Latin America), the influential standby for the poor and the marginalized by the Jesuits of Latin America as well as the growing sense of a new process of ‘revolution in freedom’ that was taking place in Chile with the ever-growing support for the socialist project of the president-to-be Salvador Allende.< Less
Identification of Human Remains (N.N.) at Patio 29, General Cemetery Santiago, Chile, March 2011 By Mario I. Aguilar
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After the military coup of 11 September 1973 thousands of suspects and supporters of the Popular Unity government were arrested while hundreds were killed. In many cases the bodies of those who had... More > been arrested, tortured and executed by the military were left on the streets of Santiago or floating on the Mapocho River. Thus, many illegal burials took place without the relatives of the dead knowing what had happened to their relatives or where their bodies had been buried. One of the locations where illegal burials took place more systematically between September 1973 and March 1974 was area 29 of the Santiago General Cemetery where crosses with no name (N.N.) marked the burial place of simple coffins containing sometimes more than one body. This work outlines the new identification of human remains related to the disappeared and the executed during the military regime of Patio 29 of the Santiago General Cemetery announced during March 2011.< Less
The Rising of the Dalai Lamas in Tibet: From the First to the Fourth 1391-1617 By Mario I. Aguilar
eBook (PDF): $6.22
This work deals with the development of the Dalai Lamas in Tibet, particularly the early ones associated with the Mongol period: the first, second, third and fourth. The history of the first four... More > Dalai Lamas shows the historical development of the Gelug-pa and the actual connections between an evolving unification of Tibet under the symbolic recognition and military support by the Mongols and their lineages. The religious and political consolidation exercised by the Fifth Dalai Lama was to provide the foundation for the Dalai Lama as a political institution and for Tibet as an independent and autonomous nation unified by a figure that was the incarnation of the Buddha and the political successor to a unified Tibet, at that time still very much isolated from the rest of the world.< Less
Identification of Human Remains (N.N.) at Patio 29, General Cemetery Santiago, Chile, March 2011 By Mario I. Aguilar
eBook (PDF): $0.00
After the military coup of 11 September 1973 thousands of suspects and supporters of the Popular Unity government were arrested while hundreds were killed. In many cases the bodies of those who had... More > been arrested, tortured and executed by the military were left on the streets of Santiago or floating on the Mapocho River. Thus, many illegal burials took place without the relatives of the dead knowing what had happened to their relatives or where their bodies had been buried. One of the locations where illegal burials took place more systematically between September 1973 and March 1974 was area 29 of the Santiago General Cemetery where crosses with no name (N.N.) marked the burial place of simple coffins containing sometimes more than one body. This work outlines the new identification of human remains related to the disappeared and the executed during the military regime of Patio 29 of the Santiago General Cemetery announced during March 2011.< Less
Identification of Human Remains (N.N.) at Chihuío (Panguipulli), Chile, July 2011 By Mario I. Aguilar
eBook (PDF): $0.00
On 17 July 2011 the human remains of five people killed by the military at Chihuío in the area of Panguipulli in southern Chile were handed over by Patricia Benhe, regional director of the... More > Servicio Médico Legal (SML) to their relatives in Valdivia. Their identification had been announced on the first of July 2011 by the director of the SML, Patricio Bustos. The fragments of bones corresponded to the human remains of Carlos Maximiliano Acuña Inostroza (46), Luis Arnaldo Ferrada Sandoval (42), Daniel Méndez Méndez (42), Ricardo Segundo Ruiz Rodríguez (24), and Manuel Jesús Sepúlveda Rebolledo (28). They had been killed on 9 October 1973 together with other 12 and they were all workers of the farm and forestry company at Panguipulli; they were organized in a trade union with the name Sindicato Campesino La Esperanza del Obrero of the Complejo Agrícola y Forestal Panguipulli.< Less
Oromia and East Africa in the 21st Century: Shifting Paradigms towards Religious and Political Diversity By Mario I. Aguilar
eBook (PDF): $0.00
Keynote address delivered at Howard University, Washington, D.C. on Saturday 31st July 2010 on the occasion of the 24th annual meeting of the Oromo Studies Association of North America.