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OTREC-RR-11-07 By Christopher Monsere et al.
Paperback: $7.35
Prints in 3-5 business days
This project evaluates the feasibility of re-identifying commercial trucks with data automatically collected at Oregon weigh-in-motion (WIM) stations. The methods consist of two main stages. The... More > first uses a Bayesian model to match each vehicle from the downstream station to the most “similar” upstream vehicle. In the second stage, methods are introduced to screen out vehicles crossing only downstream and to adjust accuracy vs. total number of vehicles matched by calculating the highest and second highest similarity measures for each vehicle. The proposed approach improves the accuracy of re-identification significantly. The models are applied to data from three WIM stations, creating two different “links” of 125 and 145 miles respectively. The algorithms match around 95% of trucks crossing both sites with about 90% accuracy. A threshold parameter allows adjustment of accuracy vs. total matched vehicles. When travel times vary widely between sites the mismatch rate increases.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-06 By Jennifer Dill et al.
Paperback: $5.70
Prints in 3-5 business days
This report presents a study of bike boxes at 10 signalized intersections in Portland, OR. Boxes were installed to increase cyclist visibility and reduce conflicts with motor vehicles (MVs). Before... More > and after video were analyzed for seven intersections with green boxes, three intersections with uncolored boxes, and two control intersections. User perceptions were measured via surveys of relevant cyclists and motorists. Both observations and motorist surveys found a high rate of compliance and understanding of the markings. Most stopping MVs did not encroach into the bike box. Both MV and bicycle crosswalk encroachment fell significantly at the box locations. Bike boxes had mixed effects on MV encroachment in the bike lane. Observed conflicts at box locations decreased, while the right turns increased. Observations found an improvement in MVs yielding at the bike box locations. Surveys found the majority of both motorists and cyclists thought the boxes made the intersections safer.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-06 By Jennifer Dill et al.
eBook (PDF): $0.00
This report presents a study of bike boxes at 10 signalized intersections in Portland, OR. Boxes were installed to increase cyclist visibility and reduce conflicts with motor vehicles (MVs). Before... More > and after video were analyzed for seven intersections with green boxes, three intersections with uncolored boxes, and two control intersections. User perceptions were measured via surveys of relevant cyclists and motorists. Both observations and motorist surveys found a high rate of compliance and understanding of the markings. Most stopping MVs did not encroach into the bike box. Both MV and bicycle crosswalk encroachment fell significantly at the box locations. Bike boxes had mixed effects on MV encroachment in the bike lane. Observed conflicts at box locations decreased, while the right turns increased. Observations found an improvement in MVs yielding at the bike box locations. Surveys found the majority of both motorists and cyclists thought the boxes made the intersections safer.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-07 By Christopher Monsere et al.
eBook (PDF): $0.00
This project evaluates the feasibility of re-identifying commercial trucks with data automatically collected at Oregon weigh-in-motion (WIM) stations. The methods consist of two main stages. The... More > first uses a Bayesian model to match each vehicle from the downstream station to the most “similar” upstream vehicle. In the second stage, methods are introduced to screen out vehicles crossing only downstream and to adjust accuracy vs. total number of vehicles matched by calculating the highest and second highest similarity measures for each vehicle. The proposed approach improves the accuracy of re-identification significantly. The models are applied to data from three WIM stations, creating two different “links” of 125 and 145 miles respectively. The algorithms match around 95% of trucks crossing both sites with about 90% accuracy. A threshold parameter allows adjustment of accuracy vs. total matched vehicles. When travel times vary widely between sites the mismatch rate increases.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-07 By Christopher Monsere et al.
eBook (PDF): $0.00
This project evaluates the feasibility of re-identifying commercial trucks with data automatically collected at Oregon weigh-in-motion (WIM) stations. The methods consist of two main stages. The... More > first uses a Bayesian model to match each vehicle from the downstream station to the most “similar” upstream vehicle. In the second stage, methods are introduced to screen out vehicles crossing only downstream and to adjust accuracy vs. total number of vehicles matched by calculating the highest and second highest similarity measures for each vehicle. The proposed approach improves the accuracy of re-identification significantly. The models are applied to data from three WIM stations, creating two different “links” of 125 and 145 miles respectively. The algorithms match around 95% of trucks crossing both sites with about 90% accuracy. A threshold parameter allows adjustment of accuracy vs. total matched vehicles. When travel times vary widely between sites the mismatch rate increases.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-06 By Jennifer Dill et al.
eBook (PDF): $0.00
This report presents a study of bike boxes at 10 signalized intersections in Portland, OR. Boxes were installed to increase cyclist visibility and reduce conflicts with motor vehicles (MVs). Before... More > and after video were analyzed for seven intersections with green boxes, three intersections with uncolored boxes, and two control intersections. User perceptions were measured via surveys of relevant cyclists and motorists. Both observations and motorist surveys found a high rate of compliance and understanding of the markings. Most stopping MVs did not encroach into the bike box. Both MV and bicycle crosswalk encroachment fell significantly at the box locations. Bike boxes had mixed effects on MV encroachment in the bike lane. Observed conflicts at box locations decreased, while the right turns increased. Observations found an improvement in MVs yielding at the bike box locations. Surveys found the majority of both motorists and cyclists thought the boxes made the intersections safer.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-06 By Jennifer Dill et al.
eBook (PDF): $0.00
This report presents a study of bike boxes at 10 signalized intersections in Portland, OR. Boxes were installed to increase cyclist visibility and reduce conflicts with motor vehicles (MVs). Before... More > and after video were analyzed for seven intersections with green boxes, three intersections with uncolored boxes, and two control intersections. User perceptions were measured via surveys of relevant cyclists and motorists. Both observations and motorist surveys found a high rate of compliance and understanding of the markings. Most stopping MVs did not encroach into the bike box. Both MV and bicycle crosswalk encroachment fell significantly at the box locations. Bike boxes had mixed effects on MV encroachment in the bike lane. Observed conflicts at box locations decreased, while the right turns increased. Observations found an improvement in MVs yielding at the bike box locations. Surveys found the majority of both motorists and cyclists thought the boxes made the intersections safer.< Less
OTREC-RR-13-07 By Miguel Figliozzi et al.
Paperback: $5.80
Prints in 3-5 business days
The Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic System (SCATS) is used to mitigate urban traffic congestion. This research combines SCATS research areas including: a) the relationship between SCATS, traffic... More > volumes, and Transit Signal Priority (TSP); b) between TSP and traffic conditions; and c) the correlation between signal timing and air quality. SCATS showed significant speed improvement at a minor intersection, though major intersection results were mixed. Non-priority signals had a greater impact on travel time than priority signals. A regression model of intersection delays showed major intersections with high cross-street volumes are not likely to experience TSP benefits. Signal timing and queuing have a high impact on pedestrian exposure. Longer green times along the main corridor significantly reduced particulate matter, whereas longer street crossing time increased queuing and exposure. Reduced bus idling time and proper bus shelter orientation are likely to reduce pollution exposure significantly.< Less
OTREC-RR-13-07 By Miguel Figliozzi et al.
eBook (PDF): $0.00
The Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic System (SCATS) is used to mitigate urban traffic congestion. This research combines SCATS research areas including: a) the relationship between SCATS, traffic... More > volumes, and Transit Signal Priority (TSP); b) between TSP and traffic conditions; and c) the correlation between signal timing and air quality. SCATS showed significant speed improvement at a minor intersection, though major intersection results were mixed. Non-priority signals had a greater impact on travel time than priority signals. A regression model of intersection delays showed major intersections with high cross-street volumes are not likely to experience TSP benefits. Signal timing and queuing have a high impact on pedestrian exposure. Longer green times along the main corridor significantly reduced particulate matter, whereas longer street crossing time increased queuing and exposure. Reduced bus idling time and proper bus shelter orientation are likely to reduce pollution exposure significantly.< Less

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4
My Wars My Wars By Richard Bushong
Paperback: $14.36
 
 
 
 
6
Vein Book Vein Book By Eric Dohner
Paperback: $10.00
 
 
7
About Face About Face By Eric Dohner
Paperback: $10.00
 
 
 
 
 
 
10
What May Come What May Come By Robert Grant
Paperback: $12.71