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A Place in the Woods, Franz Brown, Large Paintings 2003-2010 By Franz K Brown
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Artist Franz Brown began painting large pictures after his arrival in western South Dakota in 2003. Here is a collection of some of his paintings 2x3 ft and larger. Although consisting mostly of... More > landscapes from the Black Hills (SD) there are also scenes from other states such as Wisconsin, New York and California.< Less
Shadow World Voices: The Yuwipi Figures of the Lakota Medicine Man, Woptuha By Franz K Brown
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Color photography of wotawe, the amulets, charms and talismans made by Woptuha, an important Lakota medicine man of the late 1800s. Emphasis here on the wotawe used in the Yuwipi ceremony. Most of... More > the wotawe here are figures used in the Yuwipi ceremony. This was developed by Woptuha and was a ceremony of healing and finding. The figures give the appearance of a medicine man who has had his arms bound behind him. He was then covered with a blanket and then a rope was tied around him binding him further. Many of the heads represent various animals such as buffalo, elk, rabbits and moose. Some have special added features such as stones and rattlesnake tails. Others have symbols attached such as plants or heart shapes.< Less
Talking to Spirits: Talismanic Relics of the Lakota Medicine Man, Woptuha By Franz K Brown
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Color photography of wotawe, the amulets, charms and talismans made by Pte He Woptuha (Chips 1836-1916), powerful medicine man (wicasa wakan) and religious leader of the Lakota Buffalo Nation... More > (Sioux). Thousands of these powerful objects crafted by Woptuha used by the Lakota to gain the protection and help of the spirit world in matters of life, love and war. They were created to gain the help and favors of Wakantanka (the Great Spirit), the Thunder Beings and the many animals of the Lakota world. They were important in ceremonies as well as everyday activities. Works include those made for important chiefs such as Crazy Horse and Red Cloud. These objects were kept hidden since the late 1800s to prevent their destruction during a period of cultural and religious suppression. They were first made available to be seen by non-Lakota in 2005. This series is the first publication of these objects; almost all are in private Lakota collections and are of great cultural and artistic significance.< Less
Thunder Visions: The Crazy Horse Wotawe of the Lakota Medicine Man Woptuha By Franz K Brown
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Color photography of wotawe, the amulets, charms and talismans made by Pte He Woptuha (Chips 1836-1916), powerful medicine man (wicasa wakan) and religious leader of the Lakota Buffalo Nation... More > (Sioux). Focus on the wotawe made for Crazy Horse by his cousin and friend of Woptuha. Crazy Horse used wotawe throughout his life. This set includes some objects associated with the dreams of Crazy Horse, a few of the ear stones and heart stones used for protection in combat and horse raids and some used in Crazy Horses courtship and association with Black Buffalo Woman. Also presented are items used in the healing of Crazy Horse after he was shot in the face by No Water. The last section of the book presents those items used in the various burials of Crazy Horse and presents the stories of those burials based on stories handed down by Woptuha to his descendants. Woptuha was present at the death of Crazy Horse at Fort Robinson, Nebraska and assisted the family in the preparation of the body for burial.< Less
Wicasa Pejuta: Herbal Wotawe of the Lakota Medicine Man Woptuha By Franz K Brown
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Color photography of wotawe, the amulets, charms and talismans made by Pte He Woptuha, an important Lakota medicine man of the late 1800s. With attention on the wotawe with representations of... More > plants. Many plants were used by the Lakota for healing and other purposes. (One student of the culture, Father Eugene Buechel (1874-1954), identified and collected almost 300 plants of consequence to the Lakota.) This group of wotawe consists primarily of those with plant representations. The plants generally show a stem, a flower and a few leaves. These may serve as clues to what plant is indicated. Most are attached to a representation of a left hand facing forward indicating healing. The representations go from single petaled to multiple, up to 20. Unusual leaves, plant shapes and a few fungi are also represented.< Less
Shunke Wakan: Horse Wotawe of the Lakota Medicine Man, Woptuha By Franz K Brown
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Color photography of wotawe, the amulets, charms and talismans made by Pte He Woptuha, an important Lakota medicine man of the late 1800s. This set directs attention to the wotawe that include the... More > horse as an element Horses were perhaps the most beneficial things that were “given” to the Plains Indians by the white man. Moving northward from Mexico horses entered Nebraska and the Dakotas about the same time that the Lakota people entered from the East. They were called Shunke Wakan (mysterious or holy dogs) and later Tashunke. Horses took on the highly significant role of messenger or representative of the Thunder Beings. The observational skills of Woptuha are reflected in the various stances of the horses and their coloration. The use of special markings to identify particular horses and their owners is also indicated. In this book are a few of Woptuha’s wotawe that incorporated the horse.< Less