Search Results: ''

Search

×
×
×
×
6 results for ""
AIR CRASH INVESTIGATIONS CAPTAIN IN PANIC The Crash of Armavia Flight 967 By Hans Griffioen, editor
Paperback: $19.96
Prints in 3-5 business days
On 2 May 2006 Armavia Flight RNV 967, an Airbus A320, was on its way from Zvartnots (Yerevan, Armenia) to Adler (Sochi, Russia). There were 113 occupants on board: 105 passengers (including 5... More > children and 1 baby), 2 pilots,1 aircraft engineer and 5 flight attendants. Upon approaching Sochi there was confusion in regard to the weather for the scheduled landing. Finally the captain decided to return to Zvartnots, a short while later he reconsidered his decision and started the approach to Sochi after all. Just before final landing air traffic control told the captain to abort the landing. At 22:13 the aircraft struck the water, it broke up on impact, killing all aboard. The investigation concluded that the crash of Armavia Flight 967 was a Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT), specifically water, while conducting a climbing manoeuvre, after an aborted approach, along with inadequate control inputs from the Captain to Sochi airport at night with weather conditions below landing minimums for runway 06.< Less
AIR CRASH INVESTIGATIONS: THE DEADLIEST SINGLE AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT IN AVIATION HISTORY The Crash of Japan Airlines Flight 123 By Hans Griffioen, editor
eBook (PDF): $15.14
On August 12, 1985, a Japan Airlines B-747 aircraft lost, shortly after take-off, part of its tail and crashed in the mountains northwest of Tokyo. Of the 524 persons on board 520 were killed, 4... More > survived the accident. The accident was caused by a rupture of the aft pressure bulkhead of the aircraft, and the subsequent ruptures of a part of the fuselage tail, vertical fin and hydraulic flight control systems. The rupture happened as the result of an improper repair after an accident with the aircraft in Osaka, in June 1978.< Less
AIR CRASH INVESTIGATIONS, PILOT ERROR? The Crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 409 By Hans Griffioen, editor
Paperback: $29.72
Prints in 3-5 business days
On 25 January 2010, at 00:41:30 UTC, Ethiopian Airlines flight ET 409, a Boeing 737-800, on its way from Beirut to Addis Abeba, crashed just after take-off from Rafic Hariri International Airport in... More > Beirut, Lebanon, into the Mediterranean Sea about 5 NM South West of Beirut International Airport. All 90 persons on board were killed in the accident. The investigation concluded that the probable causes of the accident were pilot errors due to loss of situational awareness. Ethiopian Airlines refutes this conclusion. Other factors that could have lead to probable causes are the increased workload and stress levels that have most likely led to the captain reaching a situation of loss of situational awareness similar to a subtle incapacitation and the F/O failure to recognize it or to intervene accordingly. Ethiopian Airlines refutes the investigation. According to the airline the final report was biased, lacking evidence, incomplete and did not present the full account of the accident.< Less
AIR CRASH INVESTIGATIONS FAILING BRAKES The Crash of TAM Linhas Aereas Flight JJ3054 By Hans Griffioen, editor
Paperback: $23.99
Prints in 3-5 business days
On 17 July 2007, at 17:19 local time, an Airbus A-320, operated as flight JJ3054 by TAM Linhas Aéreas, was on its way from Porto Alegre, Brazil, for a domestic flight to Congonhas Airport in... More > São Paulo city, São Paulo State, Brazil. During the landing, at 18:54 local time, the aircraft veered to the left, overran the left edge of the runway, collided with a building, and with a fuel service station. All persons on board – six crewmembers, and 181 passengers – perished. The crash also caused 12 fatalities on the ground. The runway had recently been resurfaced, but it did not yet have water-channeling grooves cut into it to reduce the danger of hydroplaning, making landing during rain a dangerous endeavour. Flight Data Recorder information showed that immediately prior to touchdown, both thrust levers were in CL (or "climb") position, with engine power being governed by the flight computer's autothrottle system.< Less
AIR CRASH INVESTIGATIONS: THE DEADLIEST SINGLE AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT IN AVIATION HISTORY The Crash of Japan Airlines Flight 123 By Hans Griffioen, editor
Paperback: $30.77
Prints in 3-5 business days
On August 12, 1985, a Japan Airlines B-747 aircraft lost, shortly after take-off, part of its tail and crashed in the mountains northwest of Tokyo. Of the 524 persons on board 520 were killed, 4... More > survived the accident. The accident was caused by a rupture of the aft pressure bulkhead of the aircraft, and the subsequent ruptures of a part of the fuselage tail, vertical fin and hydraulic flight control systems. The rupture happened as the result of an improper repair after an accident with the aircraft in Osaka, in June 1978.< Less
AIR CRASH INVESTIGATIONS EYE OF THE NEEDLE The Crash of British Airways Flight 38 By Hans Griffioen, editor
Paperback: $27.99
Prints in 3-5 business days
On 28 November 2008, a Boeing 777-200ER, operated by British Airways as flight BA38, on its way from Beijing, China to London (Heathrow), suffered on approach to Heathrow Airport an in-flight engine... More > rollback. At 720 feet agl, the right engine ceased responding to autothrottle commands for increased power and instead the power reduced to 1.03 Engine Pressure Ratio (EPR). Seven seconds later the left engine power reduced to 1.02 EPR. This reduction led to a loss of airspeed and the aircraft touching down some 330 m short of the paved surface of Runway 27L at London Heathrow. The investigation identified that the reduction in thrust was due to restricted fuel flow to both engines. It was determined that the restriction occurred most probably in the Fuel Oil Heat Exchangers. The investigation identified the forming of ice in the fuel system as probable cause. The aircraft was destroyed, but there were no casualties.< Less

Top 10

see more >
 
1
B Inspired B Inspired By Brandon Warren
Paperback: $15.99
 
 
3
Full Count Ministries Romans Journal Full Count Ministries... By Carter Reese et al.
Paperback: $8.44