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67 results for "Algonquian"
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
eBook (ePub): $1.36
This story is set in the British province of New York during the French and Indian War, and concerns a Huron massacre (with passive French acquiescence) of from 500 to 1,500 unarmed Anglo-American... More > troops, who had honorably surrendered at Fort William Henry, plus some women and servants; the kidnapping of two sisters, daughters of the British commander; and their rescue by Hawkeye, the last two Mohicans, and others. Parts of the story may have been derived from the capture and death of Jane McCrea in July 1777 near Fort Edward, New York, by members of an Algonquian tribe.< Less
Algonquin Indian Tales By Egerton R. Young
eBook (ePub): $3.10
The Algonquins are Native Canadian inhabitants of North America who speak the Algonquin language, a divergent dialect of the Ojibwe language, which is part of the Algonquian language family.... More > Culturally and linguistically, they are closely related to the Odawa and Ojibwe, with whom they form the larger Anicinàpe (Anishinaabe) grouping. The Algonquin people call themselves Omàmiwinini (plural: Omàmiwininiwak) or the more generalised name of Anicinàpe. Most Algonquins live in Quebec. The nine Algonquin bands in that province and one in Ontario have a combined population of about 11,000. (Popular usage reflects some confusion on the point. Traditionally, the Algonquins were practitioners of Midewiwin (the right path). They believed they were surrounded by many manitòk or spirits in the natural world. French missionaries converted many Algonquins to Catholicism in the 17th and 18th centuries. Today, many of the people practice traditional Midewiwin or a syncretic merging of Christianity and Midewiwin< Less
Shadows In The Forest: Woodland Warriors Of The Mississippi Valley By Tim L. Jarvis
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Shadows In The Forest is written in two parts. The first part is dedicated to the woodland Indians who called the Mississippi Valley their home for centuries. Using primary source documentation,... More > award winning author Tim L. Jarvis provides a history of this once great and powerful Algonquian speaking Illinois Confederacy. The second part is dedicated towards conducting a historically accurate portrayal of a non-nation specific woodland Indian. As a living history interpreter, the author wants to share the knowledge that he has gained through research, along with his personal experiences from years of living history reenacting and experimental archaeology, to help you as the reader become a better living history reenactor. The goal is to provide the reader with quality information on how to conduct a more accurate woodland Indian portrayal.< Less
Women in Prehistoric Indo European Society By Paul Proulx
Paperback: $10.43
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Throughout the 19th century scholars believed that the Proto Indo European (PIE) society had cross cousin marriage, matrilineal descent, and matriarchy (a female version of patriarchy). Then by the... More > middle of the 20th century, the backlash was proclaiming just the opposite: that PIE society was patrilineal and patriarchical, and had husband centered residence. Friedrich (1966:9) even speculated that "widows may have been marked for some mortuary ritual; sacrifice and interment with the husband." Now new insights suggest that the 19th century scholars may have been closer to right than the later ones. The evidence for husband centered residence and patriliny does not withstand critical examination, and, although there is no evidence of matriarchy, the evidence for wife centered residence is good. Matriliny too seems very likely, and women evidently had important active roles cementing family alliances. The trail of these new insights begins among the eastern Algonquian peoples...< Less
Women in Prehistoric Indo European Society By Paul Proulx
eBook (PDF): $0.00
Throughout the 19th century scholars believed that the Proto Indo European (PIE) society had cross cousin marriage, matrilineal descent, and matriarchy (a female version of patriarchy). Then by the... More > middle of the 20th century, the backlash was proclaiming just the opposite: that PIE society was patrilineal and patriarchical, and had husband centered residence. Friedrich (1966:9) even speculated that "widows may have been marked for some mortuary ritual; sacrifice and interment with the husband." Now new insights suggest that the 19th century scholars may have been closer to right than the later ones. The evidence for husband centered residence and patriliny does not withstand critical examination, and, although there is no evidence of matriarchy, the evidence for wife centered residence is good. Matriliny too seems very likely, and women evidently had important active roles cementing family alliances. The trail of these new insights begins among the eastern Algonquian peoples...< Less
Journal of The Honorable George T. Wendell of Mackinac County, Michigan (1850) By Brett Dicken Brown
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This "Journal" was recorded by Mr. Wendell in 1850 and includes a translation of various items from the native tongue to English. The native tongues appear to be all Central Algonquian... More > languages and Mr. Wendell mentions Menominee, Washtenaw, Algonquin and Pottawatomie. There is also a page devoted to a description of the Northern League of Indian Tribes. The topics covered are "Indian" names for: Towns in Canada, New York, Northwest Territory and Pennsylvania; Rivers in Michigan and Wisconsin; Bays in Michigan; Islands in Michigan; Points (Geographic) in Michigan; Lime Island and Indian "Cross' Distance Markers and Stick; Lakes of Michigan; Ottawa & Chippewa Indian Names of Kinds of Woods in Michigan; Grains in Michigan; Months of the Year and other miscellaneous items. Also included is an index of names referred to in the probate papers, many of which were prominent citizens and government officials of the Village of Mackinac during the late 1880's.< Less
Native Americans: Discover the History and Cultures of the First Americans with 15 Projects By Kim Klavin
eBook (PDF): $8.99
Explore how the first Americans, faced with varying climates in a vast land hundreds and thousands of years ago, developed everything we take for granted today: food supplies, shelter, clothing,... More > religion, games, jewelry, transportation, communication, and more. Native Americans: Discover the History and Cultures of the First Americans uses hands-on activities to illuminate how the Native Americans survived and thrived by creating tools, culture, and a society based on their immediate environment. Entertaining illustrations and fascinating sidebars bring the topic to life, while Words to Know highlighted and defined within the text reinforce new vocabulary. Projects include building an archaic toolkit, creating Algonquian art, experimenting with irrigation systems, inventing hieroglyphics, and playing the Inuit game of nugluktaq. Kids ages 9–12 will gain an appreciation for the diversity of people and culture native to America, and learn to problem solve in a way that respects the environment.< Less

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