Search Results: 'Catawba'

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7 results for "Catawba"
Catawba County, N.C. - Road and Bridge Records (1869-1911) By Stewart Dunaway
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Catawba County was formed in 1842 from the northern part of Lincoln County. Therefore, researchers will have to review the Lincoln County records to go back further in time (which have already been... More > transcribed with a date range of 1781-1868). This collection includes a nice collection of bridge records, and road records. Several period maps are included. A brief review of two historical sites are included - Bunker Hill Covered Bridge, and Murray Mill including some maps.< Less
Gaston County, N.C. - Road, Bridge, and Mill Records (1859-1909) By Stewart Dunaway
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Gaston County was form in 1846 from the southern portion of Lincoln County. In order to understand where to search for OLDER records, let’s go back in time. Lincoln was formed in 1779 from... More > Tryon County. Lincoln was reduced in size, when Cleveland County gets part of the western side in 1841. The very next year, 1842, the northern part of the county was removed, forming Catawba County. Four years later, the southern part is removed when Gaston County was formed. There are NO preserved Tryon County records in the State Archives (pertaining to road, bridge, mill, ferry, or ordinary records). Therefore, the older records will require searching in Lincoln County. The bridge records include bridge drawings, and a number of iron bridge drawings, and contracts. The road records (1859-1909) are a general collection of late 19th and early 20th century contents. The mill records are two law suits, one dealing with a dam being raised and flooding, the other details dumping of waste (dye) from a textile mill.< Less
Wright Census Records 1790-1880 Western North Carolina By Marvin A. Grant, Jr.
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Census records for the Wright surname in Western North Carolina, including alternate spellings. Includes 1790, 1800, 1810, 1820, 1830, 1840, 1850, 1860, 1870 and 1880 census and full name... More > index. Counties included: Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Buncombe, Burke, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Catawba, Cherokee, Clay, Cleveland, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Gaston, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Iredell, Jackson, Lincoln, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mecklenburg, Mitchell, Polk, Rowan, Rutherford, Stokes, Surry, Swain, Transylvania, Union, Watauga, Wilkes, Yadkin, Yancey< Less
Wright Census Records 1790-1880 Western North Carolina By Marvin A. Grant, Jr.
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Census records for the Wright surname in Western North Carolina, including alternate spellings. Includes 1790, 1800, 1810, 1820, 1830, 1840, 1850, 1860, 1870 and 1880 census and full name... More > index. Counties included: Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Buncombe, Burke, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Catawba, Cherokee, Clay, Cleveland, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Gaston, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Iredell, Jackson, Lincoln, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mecklenburg, Mitchell, Polk, Rowan, Rutherford, Stokes, Surry, Swain, Transylvania, Union, Watauga, Wilkes, Yadkin, Yancey< Less
Salisbury District Superior Court Records - Ejectments (1753-1809) By Stewart Dunaway
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Salisbury Superior Court Records (1753-1809) is a very large collection of interesting and eclectic set of records, dealing with land issues. Interesting, due to the broadness of the collection,... More > which includes State Supreme Court hearings, District Superior hearings, and Rowan County records. In the early years, State Supreme Courts were held in different districts, of which some of these records are included in this volume. Eclectic, due to the diverse nature of the type of records within this collection (box in the State Archives). This collection includes ejectments, land disputes, copies of plats, land grants, and even bonds dealing with deer skin trading with the Catawba Indians. There are plats and records, which deal with old McCulloh land grants, as well as some dealing with Granville grants.< Less
Legends of The Lumbee (and some that will be) By Arvis Locklear Boughman
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The 55,000 members of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina reside primarily in Robeson, Hoke, Cumberland, and Scotland counties. The Lumbee Tribe is the largest tribe in North Carolina. They take... More > their name from the Lumbee River which winds its way through Robeson County. The ancestors of the Lumbee were mainly Cheraw and related Siouan-speaking Indians. One of the favorite activities of the many Lumbee families was sharing stories around the fire at night. More recently, Lumbee storytellers such as Barbara Braveboy Locklear, Barbara Locklear, Mardella Lowry, and Nora Dial-Stanley, carry on this ancient storytelling tradition to a much broader audience. The ancestors of the Lumbee tribe shared many stories with other local tribes such as the Cherokee, Creek, and Catawba. As the Lumbee people shared stories, they found that their sister tribes also told tales about “little wild spirit people”, animals, the afterlife, and how our world came to be.< Less
The Kingmakers Book Three By Jim\ White
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A detailed website in the build processes will be Internet Online in less than thirty days from today July 31, 2013 to help people trying to Connect Native American families to her or his ancestors... More > primarily Stymied by the Dawes Rolls Fiasco begin 1831 not put to words until 1906? US government broke those treaties by not insuring Families at least learned of their Ancestors fate. More than 35,000 Cherokee Shawnee Catawba and Seminole died when forced to live in WHOSE Concentration Holding Mud Hole Camps not only in Tennessee Alabama and Georgia include Florida North Carolina Arkansas Illinois Indiana and Missouri. I personally documented 4,813 Native American who died on the Cherokee Trails of Tears Not … instead died in filthy Concentration Holding Points of which thousands of records were burned and or dumped in the Tennessee River or every deep Back Pool water in the area weighted down with Dead Native American Bodies and rocks attached to insure the fishes did the Filthy Evil Nasty Job.< Less