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11 results for "Greek chorus"
DEATH OF A CHORUS BOY By Elmo Lincoln Astor
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It is 533 B.C., and the Greek playwright, Thespis, is writing a new play. Although he is known to us now as the father of tragedy, and had won top prize at the festival of Dionysus in November, 534... More > B.C., for his innovative work, Thespis is now attempting to write a comedy- "Death, Take a Holiday." This piece, however, pokes fun at the gods. If they do exist, he'll have to answer to them. If they do not exist, how many people who do believe in the gods will be angry with him? Regardless, the show must go on, because, well- there's no business like show business.< Less
Greek Satyr Play: Five Studies By Mark Griffith
eBook (ePub): $14.95
With a new introduction and some revisions, these reprinted essays on Classical Greek satyr plays suggest new critical approaches to this important dramatic genre. Griffith argues that satyr plays... More > presented audiences with sophisticated, multilayered narratives of romance, escapist adventure, and musical-choreographic exuberance, amounting to a “parallel universe” to that of the accompanying tragedies in the City Dionysia festival. The class and status distinctions between heroic/divine characters and the rest (choruses, messengers, servants, etc.) that are so integral to Athenian tragedy are shown to be present also, in exaggerated form, in satyr drama, with the satyr chorus occupying a role that also inevitably recalled for the Athenian audiences their own (often foreign-born) slaves. The satyr plays’ stylistic fusion of adventure and romance, elegant sophistication and rustic naïveté, anticipates in many respects the later developments of Greek pastoral and prose romance.< Less
Greek Satyr Play: Five Studies By Mark Griffith
Paperback: $29.95
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With a new introduction and some revisions, these reprinted essays on Classical Greek satyr plays suggest new critical approaches to this important dramatic genre. Griffith argues that satyr plays... More > presented audiences with sophisticated, multilayered narratives of romance, escapist adventure, and musical-choreographic exuberance, amounting to a “parallel universe” to that of the accompanying tragedies in the City Dionysia festival. The class and status distinctions between heroic/divine characters and the rest (choruses, messengers, servants, etc.) that are so integral to Athenian tragedy are shown to be present also, in exaggerated form, in satyr drama, with the satyr chorus occupying a role that also inevitably recalled for the Athenian audiences their own (often foreign-born) slaves. The satyr plays’ stylistic fusion of adventure and romance, elegant sophistication and rustic naïveté, anticipates in many respects the later developments of Greek pastoral and prose romance.< Less
Catharsis By Jean Bodin
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For Bodin, the ``theatre maker'', poetry and events have to be visual, simply to be narrative on stage. The Hard Way Out is a laboratory for political disruption. As in Ancient Greek choruses his... More > theatre investigates the collective narrative for the sake of the present. He reaches from the European civil war in the 20th century to the American identity crisis since 9/11.< Less
The Trojan women of Euripides By Euripides .
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The Trojan women of Euripides
A Comedy of Masks by Ernest Christopher Dowson and Arthur Moore By Ernest Christopher Dowson
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In that intricate and obscure locality, which stretches between the Tower and Poplar, a tarry region, scarcely suspected by the majority of Londoners, to whom the "Port of London" is an... More > expression purely geographical, there is, or was not many years ago, to be found a certain dry dock called Blackpool, but better known from time immemorial to skippers and longshoremen, and all who go down to the sea in ships, as "Rainham's Dock."< Less
Four Plays of Aeschylus By Aeschylus
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Hint: You can preview this book by clicking on "Preview" which is located under the cover of this book. About the author: Aeschylus (/ˈiːskᵻləs/ or... More > /ˈɛskᵻləs/; Greek: Αἰσχύλος Aiskhulos; Ancient Greek: [ai̯s.kʰý.los]; c. 525/524 – c. 456/455 BC) was an ancient Greek tragedian. He is also the first whose plays still survive; the others are Sophocles and Euripides. He is often described as the father of tragedy: critics and scholars' knowledge of the genre begins with his work, and understanding of earlier tragedies is largely based on inferences from his surviving plays. According to Aristotle, he expanded the number of characters in theater to allow conflict among them, whereas characters previously had interacted only with the chorus. Excerpt from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeschylus< Less
Three Tragedies By Dr. Balwinder Singh
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This book, “Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare's King Lear and O’Neill’s Mourning Becomes Electra as tragedies” delves deep into skein of tragic tangle to delineate how... More > and why tragedy happens with man. It would explore what tragedy means. It would also highlight the paradigmatic shifts the tragedy has undergone right from the Greek period through the Shakespearean to the Modern period. During the Greek period, tragedy in the scheme of things was predominantly dominated by divine order. The plan and plot was almost preordained through prophecies and oracles. In Shakespeare’s era, it was centered more on character of man. In Modern times, heroes got trapped in tragic traps due psychological problems and the concept of tragedy in its various aspects e.g. plot, character (tragic), thought, diction and other ingredients like masks and chorus, from the ancient times through the Shakespearean up till the Modern period, tragedy is all alive with its tragic impact intact.< Less
Jason and the Argonauts Youth Theatre Play By J S Forrest
eBook (PDF): $3.10
An adaptation of Jason and the Argonauts, keeping to it's original setting. A flexible cast makes this perfect for youth groups, ranging from 8 to 20 students. Running time approx 1 hour and can be... More > played in practically any setting. The play has moments of comedy and high drama and utilizes the characters of Jason, Medea, Heracles (or Hercules), the Sirens, the Gods and the Chorus. The play has had several successful productions and is written by a professional children's theatre specialist and scriptwriter.< Less
Aeschylus: The Surviving Works By Aeschylus
eBook (ePub): $3.99
Aeschylus was the first of the three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays can still be read or performed, the others being Sophocles and Euripides. He is often described as the father of tragedy.... More > According to Aristotle, he expanded the number of characters in plays to allow for conflict amongst them, whereas previously characters had interacted only with the chorus. Only seven of his estimated seventy to ninety plays have survived into modern times, and there is a longstanding debate about his authorship of one of these plays, Prometheus Bound. He was probably the first dramatist to present plays as a trilogy and his Oresteia is the only ancient example of the form to have survived. At least one of his works was influenced by the Persian invasion of Greece, which took place during his lifetime. This play, The Persians, is the only extant classical Greek tragedy concerned with recent history and it is a useful source of information about that period.< Less