Search Results: 'Indians of Mexico'

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115 results for "Indians of Mexico"
Exhibition: Portraits of American Indians: Comprising the Blackfeet Indians of Montana and The Pueblo Indians of New Mexico By Langdon W. Kihn
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Exhibition: Portraits of American Indians: Comprising the Blackfeet Indians of Montana and The Pueblo Indians of New Mexico
Wildflowers of Colorado and New Mexico By Leonard Foltz
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Mountain wild flowers of Colorado and New Mexico captured by Leonard Foltz during a spectacular blooming season in late July, 2014. Photographer Leonard Foltz is co-owner of Dancing Oaks Nursery in... More > Monmouth, Oregon and is passionate about plants both large and small, wild or cultivated. When possible, he loves to travel the world and to see and photograph plants growing in their native environments. All the plants pictured in this calendar are native except for the Musk Thistle which has been introduced but now grows in the wild. www.dancingoaks.com Print Details: 11" x 8.5", coil binding, white interior paper (100# weight), full-color interior ink< Less
Down Mexico Way By Ian Middleton
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Dusty pueblos adorned with adobe houses, each with a man sitting against a wall, a large sombrero tipped over his face, heavy snoring sounds emitting from underneath that hat; barefoot Indian women... More > and children walking through the dusty, cobbled streets. These were the first images that came to mind when Ian Middleton thought of Mexico. But was it really like that? He had read James A Michener's historical novel on Mexico, and it had portrayed a country of rich cultural diversity. These are the things that had ignited in Ian a burning desire to see this country for himself. As a novice traveller this was an extremely daring move. Especially as he would be travelling alone. Ian knew nobody in Mexico. Although he’d travelled the year before for the first time in Australia, he’d had the advantage of knowing people there. This would his first real trip in a foreign land completely alone.< Less
The Beauty Of Santa Fe, New Mexico By Joseph Frank Baraba
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This photography book is dedicated to the beauty of Santa Fe, New Mexico, it's culture, buildings, Spanish Market, Indian Market, Wildlife.
Three Years Among the Mexicans and Indians By Gen. Thomas James
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A description of the expeditions of Gen. Thomas James into the Upper Missouri River Region as an employee of the Missouri Fur Company in 1809 and two expeditions to Santa Fe as a trader in 1811 and... More > again 1822. A very important primary source book for this period in early American history, the Rocky Mountain Fur Trade, and the Santa Fe Trade.< Less
The Revenge of Quetzalcoatl: Hernando Cortés and the Invasion of Mexico By Frederick A. Ober
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Aztec legends warned of the fearsome return of a white, bearded god from across the seas who would destroy their civilization. This prediction came true with the arrival on American shores of... More > Hernando Cortés. Leading a small band of ruthless, determined Spaniards, Cortés and hundreds of thousands of Indian allies marched into the Aztec capital city Tenochtitlan, and, after incredible adventures, finally laid waste to that metropolis and rebuilt it into modern-day Mexico City. This is the full, incredible-but-true story of how a few hundred Europeans overturned history. Important revelations in this book include: - That smallpox was brought to the Americas not by Europeans, but a Negro in Spanish service; and - That despite propaganda about “guns and steel,” the Spaniards would not have succeeded in overthrowing the Aztec Empire had the surrounding Indian tribes, long victims of their cruel neighbors, not provided hundreds of thousands of warriors in the final sacking of Tenochtitlan.< Less
The Revenge of Quetzalcoatl: Hernando Cortés and the Invasion of Mexico By Frederick A. Ober
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Aztec legends warned of the fearsome return of a white, bearded god from across the seas who would destroy their civilization. This prediction came true with the arrival on American shores of... More > Hernando Cortés. Leading a small band of ruthless, determined Spaniards, Cortés and hundreds of thousands of Indian allies marched into the Aztec capital city Tenochtitlan, and, after incredible adventures, finally laid waste to that metropolis and rebuilt it into modern-day Mexico City. This is the full, incredible-but-true story of how a few hundred Europeans overturned history. Important revelations in this book include: - That smallpox was brought to the Americas not by Europeans, but a Negro in Spanish service; and - That despite propaganda about “guns and steel,” the Spaniards would not have succeeded in overthrowing the Aztec Empire had the surrounding Indian tribes, long victims of their cruel neighbors, not provided hundreds of thousands of warriors in the final sacking of Tenochtitlan.< Less
History of the Conquest of Mexico: With a Preliminary View of Ancient Mexican Civilization, and the Life of the Conqueror, Hernando Cortes By William Hickling Prescott
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History of the Conquest of Mexico: With a Preliminary View of Ancient Mexican Civilization, and the Life of the Conqueror, Hernando Cortes By William Hickling Prescott. Illustrations from the... More > Montezuma Edition. Prescott expressed interest in his correspondence in writing a biography of Molière, and Ticknor records that he sent Prescott "a collection of about 50 volumes" of relevant material. However, after writing to Ángel Calderón de la Barca, a Spanish minister living in Mexico, who was able to provide source material, Prescott started research on what was to become the History of the Conquest of Mexico. There was relatively little scholarship on Aztec civilization, and Prescott dismissed much of it as "speculation", and he therefore had to rely almost exclusively on primary sources. He considered Edward King's theory that the pre-Columbian civilizations were non-indigenous to be fallacious, although he was greatly indebted to him for his anthology of Aztec codices in the Antiquities of Mexico.< Less
Alberta History: THE OLD NORTH TRAIL (Cree Trail) - 15,000 Years of Indian History: Prehistoric to 1750 By Joachim Fromhold
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In the 1890's stories were circulating that at one time there had existed a 'North Trail', used by the aboriginal population and extending from the Arctic to Mexico. Historians generally... More > discounted this as a myth. As late as the 1970's the OLD NORTH TRAIL was said to be a myth. In 1971 the Author published research that indicated that such a trail did in fact exist and had a documentable history. This publication takes that documented history back to the prehistoric period and on to the early historic period of Alberta and Montana. The book describes the trail and the location of the trail, suplemented with photos, and documents the events and use of the trail and portions of the trail as known to 1750 with numerous photographs. 203 pages. A following publication will cover the more recent history of the trail. known to< Less
Alberta History - The Old North Trail (Cree Trail), 15,000 Years of Indian History; 1820-1850 By Joachim Fromhold
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Volume 3 in the history of the North Trail from New Mexico to Northern Alberta, covering the 30 years (1 generation) from 1820-1850. This period saw changes along the north trail that set the stage... More > for the history of Alberta and western Canada as we know it - thanks to the unexpected results of an action by the Hudson's Bay Company. Blackfoot power and dominance began to subside in both the north and south of the trail, while the Mountain Cree now became the dominant group along the northern portion of the trail and in adjacent areas of British Columbia, Montana and Idaho. At the same time the Iroquois freemen, scattered from Lesser Slave Lake to Utah, became fully integrated into the Cree. Though the Blackfoot continued to be prominent and dominant in both north and south, culturally the area was now divided into the violent and hostile south and the relatively peaceful north. Throughout this area a rudi-mentary Postal service now connected the far-flung Cree. 522 pages.< Less