Search Results: 'Jesse Benton'

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4 results for "Jesse Benton"
The Jesse Benton Letters (1780-1790) By Stewart Dunaway, David Southern
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This book contains a collection of letters between Jesse Benton and Thomas Hart. Thomas Hart was the owner of a large mill complex just east of the Town of Hillsborough, which he sold to Benton.... More > Benton became Hart’s attorney while Hart continues his migration out of NC to a number of other states. These letters were located in the Library of Congress and provide great insight to life in the area, and legal matters with the Transylvania Land Company in TN. It was this mill site (first as Maddox Mill in the 1760s) was used as a meeting place for the Regulation, as well as the location of a Revolutionary skirmish (Harts Mill). A dossier of the people mentioned in the letter, as well as some locales is provided (Rochester, Tullock, Johnston, Burke, Mallett, Munford, Kellow, etc)< Less
Volume 3329, Jerusalem (mendelssohn) --- Jesse Benton By Print Wikipedia
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Volume 3329, Jerusalem (mendelssohn)---Jesse Benton Print Wikipedia is a both a utilitarian visualization of the largest accumulation of human knowledge and a poetic gesture towards the inhuman... More > scale of big data. Michael Mandberg wrote software that parses the entirety of the English-language Wikipedia database and programmatically lays out nearly 7500 volumes, complete with covers, and then uploads them to Lulu.com for print-on-demand. Print Wikipedia draws attention to the sheer size of the encyclopedia's content and the impossibility of rendering Wikipedia as a material object in fixed form: Once a volume is printed it is already out of date. It is also a work of found poetry built on what is likely the largest appropriation ever made. As we become increasingly more dependent on information and source material on the Internet today, Mandiberg explores the accessibility of its vastness.< Less
Thirty Years' View : Or, a History of the Working of the American Government for Thirty Years, from 1820 to 1850, Volume I (Illustrated) By Thomas Hart Benton
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“Thomas Hart Benton, known as a senator for thirty years in Congress, and as the author of several works, was born in Orange County, near Hillsborough, North Carolina, March 14th, 1782; and was... More > the son of Col. Jesse Benton, an able lawyer of that State, and of Ann Gooch, of Hanover county, Virginia, of the family of the Gooches of colonial residence in that State. By this descent, on the mother's side, he took his name from the head of the Hart family (Col. Thomas Hart, of Lexington, Kentucky), his mother's maternal uncle; and so became related to the numerous Hart family. He was cousin to Mrs. Clay, born Lucretia Hart, the wife of Henry Clay; and, by an easy mistake, was often quoted during his public life as the relative of Mr. Clay himself. He lost his father before he was eight years of age, and fell under the care of a mother still young, and charged with a numerous family, all of tender age—and devoting herself to them.”< Less
Thirty Years' View : Or, a History of the Working of the American Government for Thirty Years, from 1820 to 1850, Volume II (Illustrated) By Thomas Hart Benton
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“Thomas Hart Benton, known as a senator for thirty years in Congress, and as the author of several works, was born in Orange County, near Hillsborough, North Carolina, March 14th, 1782; and was... More > the son of Col. Jesse Benton, an able lawyer of that State, and of Ann Gooch, of Hanover county, Virginia, of the family of the Gooches of colonial residence in that State. By this descent, on the mother's side, he took his name from the head of the Hart family (Col. Thomas Hart, of Lexington, Kentucky), his mother's maternal uncle; and so became related to the numerous Hart family. He was cousin to Mrs. Clay, born Lucretia Hart, the wife of Henry Clay; and, by an easy mistake, was often quoted during his public life as the relative of Mr. Clay himself. He lost his father before he was eight years of age, and fell under the care of a mother still young, and charged with a numerous family, all of tender age—and devoting herself to them.”< Less