Search Results: 'Jewish Welfare'


2 results for "Jewish Welfare"
Schnorrers - Wandering Jews in Germany 1850-1914 By Roni Aaron Bornstein
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The lives of those many Jewish people who achieved great success in Germany have been well documented, but there is another side to this story—that of the hundreds of thousands of poor... More > migrants, beggars and wandering Jews who struggled to eke out a meager living as they moved from community to community. Some of those beggars told stories (in Yiddish: “Schnur”), which is why they were called Schnorrers. These Schnorrers wandered from place to place in search of work and food. Our book tells their story. Dr. Roni Aaron Bornstein has a PhD in European History from Tel Aviv University. The author spent several years in various German and Jewish community archives all over Germany, where he was exposed to a large number of primary sources, published here in English for the first time. Dr. Bornstein is currently the owner and CEO of a number of companies, as well as the chairman of the Israel-Japan Friendship Society and Chamber of Commerce.< Less
Kapporos Then and Now: Toward a More Compassionate Tradition By Yonassan Gershom
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Every year, right before Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, there is a cultural war in certain Jewish neighborhoods over a ceremony called Kapporos, in which a chicken is slaughtered just before the... More > holy day. The animal rights people show up claiming, “Meat is murder!” while the Orthodox and Hasidic Jews who practice this ceremony accuse the activists of antisemitism and violating their freedom of religion. Epithets fly and confrontations occur across the barricades, but nobody is really listening to each other. Rabbi Gershom seeks to build a bridge of understanding between these two warring camps. On the one hand, he opposes using live chickens as Kapporos, and, like many other religious Jews before him, advocates giving money to charity instead. But on the other hand, he is himself a Hasid who understands and believes in the kabbalistic principle of "raising holy sparks" so central to the ceremony. In fact, he says, it is that very mysticism that has led him not to use chickens for the ritual.< Less