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5 results for "John Bell Hood"
Advance and Retreat By General John Bell Hood
eBook (PDF): $7.50
The is a reprint of the accounts of the war as experienced and written about by the great Confederate General John Bell Hood in 1880.
Advance and Retreat By General John Bell Hood
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The is a reprint of the accounts of the war as experienced and written about by the great Confederate General John Bell Hood in 1880.
The Battle of Spring Hill By Captain John K. Shellenberger
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Spring Hill was the prelude to the Battle of Franklin. On the night of November 28, 1864, Gen. John Bell Hood’s Army of Tennessee marched toward Spring Hill to get astride Maj. Gen. John M.... More > Schofield’s Union army’s life line. Cavalry skirmishing between Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson’s Union cavalry and Maj. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Confederate troopers continued throughout the day as the Confederates advanced. On November 29, Hood’s infantry crossed Duck River and converged on Spring Hill. In the meantime, Maj. Gen. Schofield reinforced the troops holding the crossroads at Spring Hill. In late afternoon, the Federals repulsed a piecemeal Confederate infantry attack. During the night, the rest of Schofield’s command passed from Columbia through Spring Hill to Franklin. This was, perhaps, Hood’s best chance to isolate and defeat the Union army. The engagement has been described as “one of the most controversial non-fighting events of the entire war."< Less
The Battle of Spring Hill By Captain John K. Shellenberger
eBook (PDF): $3.99
Spring Hill was the prelude to the Battle of Franklin. On the night of November 28, 1864, Gen. John Bell Hood’s Army of Tennessee marched toward Spring Hill to get astride Maj. Gen. John M.... More > Schofield’s Union army’s life line. Cavalry skirmishing between Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson’s Union cavalry and Maj. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Confederate troopers continued throughout the day as the Confederates advanced. On November 29, Hood’s infantry crossed Duck River and converged on Spring Hill. In the meantime, Maj. Gen. Schofield reinforced the troops holding the crossroads at Spring Hill. In late afternoon, the Federals repulsed a piecemeal Confederate infantry attack. During the night, the rest of Schofield’s command passed from Columbia through Spring Hill to Franklin. This was, perhaps, Hood’s best chance to isolate and defeat the Union army. The engagement has been described as “one of the most controversial non-fighting events of the entire war."< Less
Company 'A', corps of engineers, U.S.A., 1846-'48, in the Mexican war By Gustavus Woodson Smith
Paperback: List Price: $7.14 $3.57 | You Save: 50%
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Hint: You can preview this book by clicking on "Preview" which is located under the cover of this book. About the author: Mexican-American WarAmerican Civil WarGustavus Woodson Smith... More > (November 30, 1821 – June 24, 1896), more commonly known as G.W. Smith, was a career United States Army officer who fought in the Mexican-American War, a civil engineer, and a major general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He briefly commanded the Army of Northern Virginia from May 31 until June 1, 1862, following the wounding of General Joseph E. Johnston at the Battle of Seven Pines. Smith later served as Interim Confederate Secretary of War and in the Georgia state militia.Smith was born in Georgetown, Kentucky, and was a brother-in-law of Horace Randal and a distant relative of John Bell Hood. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point as a brevet second lieutenant in 1842. Excerpt from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustavus_Woodson_Smith< Less