Search Results: 'Lower Howard's Creek'

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4 results for "Lower Howard's Creek"
John Martin of Lower Howard's Creek, Clark County, Kentucky By Harry G. Enoch
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John Martin was a pioneer of Clark County, Kentucky, where he lived on Lower Howard’s Creek. John had been a blacksmith in Goochland County, Virginia, where he married Rachel Pace. He owned a... More > small farm there before moving to Ballenger Creek in what is now Fluvanna County. John and Rachel were the parents of thirteen children. In the late 1780s, the parents and children moved to Kentucky. John settled on a hillside farm in an area then known as the Bush Settlement. John now has descendants too numerous to count, some still in Clark County, the others spread all over. Our John Martin has been confused with a number of other men of the same name, and their deeds have been conflated to create a mythical man. One goal of this work is to provide a fully documented history of the life of John Martin of Lower Howard’s Creek. Illustrated, indexed.< Less
John Howard of Howard's Creek: Biography of a Kentucky Pioneer By Harry G. Enoch
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During his visit to the western country from Virginia in 1775, John Howard staked out land claims on two tributaries of the Kentucky River—one a few miles upstream from Fort Boonesborough, the... More > other just downstream from the fort. These tributaries came to be known as Upper Howard’s Creek and Lower Howard’s Creek. John Howard, the pioneer who gave his name to these Clark County creeks, later settled near Lexington in Fayette County and died there at the age of 103. His home place, the plantation known as “Howard’s Grove,” was located on the now-legendary Gainesway Farm. 74 pp., illus., indexed< Less
Salt Spring Trace and Other Pioneer Era Roads on Lower Howard’s Creek, Clark County, Kentucky By Harry G. Enoch
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One of the earliest roads in Kentucky led from Fort Boonesborough to a prime hunting location known as the Lower Blue Licks, or the Lower Salt Spring. Salt licks attracted buffalo in large numbers... More > and were favored spots for hunters. Licks also provided a valuable source of salt that was critical for preserving meat. In 1775, Kentucky’s settlement year, the hunters at Boonesborough discovered the Lower Blue Licks by following a series of connected buffalo traces. The path crossed the river near Boonesborough and went up Lower Howard’s Creek in present-day Clark County. There it traverses the Lower Howard’s Creek Nature & Heritage Preserve. This report describes the history and geography of the Salt Spring Trace, as well as other early roads in the Preserve.< Less
Rise and Fall of Orson Martin, Blacksmith By Harry Enoch
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Orson Martin was born in Goochland County, Virginia, the son of John and Rachel Martin. Orson learned the blacksmith trade from his father. After the Revolutionary War, the family moved to Kentucky... More > and settled near Boonesborough in an area that became one of the earliest industrial centers west of the Allegheny Mountains. Orson’s brothers William and Valentine became prominent figures in the neighborhood. It was Orson, however, who had the vision to recognize the commercial potential of the Lower Howard’s Creek valley, along with the initiative and skills to take advantage of the opportunity. During the early 1800s, he was one of the leading entrepreneurs of the valley, where he had his own sawmill, gristmill and blacksmith shop. Unfortunately, after such early promise, Orson’s career crashed under the weight of family problems and business reversals brought on by the influence of alcohol. This biography describes the successes and failures of Orson Martin, blacksmith.< Less