Search Results: 'Safety and therapeutic-effectiveness'

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4 results for "Safety and therapeutic-effectiveness"
Weight Loss and Anti-Obesity Effects of Natural Saponins Extracted from Herbs and Foods (Journal of Personalized and Systems Medicine) By PharmTao.com (Editor)
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Obesity is a serious health problem globally. However, only a few medications are available on the market, and their long-term safety is still unknown. Pancreatic lipase activity is related to the... More > source of excess calories. Natural dietary supplements such as herbal extracts that can serve as pancreatic lipase inhibitors have been considered promising candidates for weight loss and anti-obesity. For example, herbs such as ginseng have been found useful for the management of metabolic syndromes. Saponins isolated from these herbs may have significant weight loss effects. Many of these saponins have both anti-diabetes and anti-obesity properties. They can inhibit pancreatic lipase and delay the intestinal absorption of dietary fat. Many also have anti-inflammatory properties. Some can control blood pressure and reduce risks of cardiovascular diseases. They can be potential therapeutics for healing obesity-related diseases including hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and atherosclerosis.< Less
Forty-Five Years of Research at the NBRL, Boston, Massachusetts By C. Robert Valeri, MD, Gina Ragno Giorgio, Esq
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In 1789, Horace Walpole defined serendipity as “making discoveries by accident”; it was through acceptance of this inherent chaos that some of history’s most influential advances... More > were made, such as Alfred Nobel and dynamite, Marie Curie and radium, and Alexander Fleming and penicillin. Usually chaotic-serendipitous observations are either not recognized by hypothesis-driven researchers or, if observed, rejected by them. Fortunately, the Naval Blood Research Laboratory (NBRL) has been able to embrace important chaotic and serendipitous observations that were critical to the productivity of the laboratory. As former director of the NBRL, C. Robert Valeri, MD, spent forty-five years exploring hematocrit, bleeding time, and nonsurgical blood loss, as well as other blood-related advances used to treat military and civilian personnel. In this volume, he reviews those advances and recalls his time at the NBRL.< Less
Forty-Five Years of Research at the NBRL, Boston, Massachusetts By C. Robert Valeri, MD, Gina . Ragno Giorgio, Esq
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In 1789, Horace Walpole defined serendipity as “making discoveries by accident”; it was through acceptance of this inherent chaos that some of history’s most influential advances... More > were made, such as Alfred Nobel and dynamite, Marie Curie and radium, and Alexander Fleming and penicillin. Usually chaotic-serendipitous observations are either not recognized by hypothesis-driven researchers or, if observed, rejected by them. Fortunately, the Naval Blood Research Laboratory (NBRL) has been able to embrace important chaotic and serendipitous observations that were critical to the productivity of the laboratory. As former director of the NBRL, C. Robert Valeri, MD, spent forty-five years exploring hematocrit, bleeding time, and nonsurgical blood loss, as well as other blood-related advances used to treat military and civilian personnel. In this volume, he reviews those advances and recalls his time at the NBRL.< Less
Forty-Five Years of Research at the NBRL, Boston, Massachusetts: Chaotic Observations, Serendipity, and Patience By C. Robert Valeri, Gina Ragno Giorgio, Esq.
eBook (ePub): $8.99
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In 1789, Horace Walpole defined serendipity as “making discoveries by accident”; it was through acceptance of this inherent chaos that some of history’s most influential advances... More > were made, such as Alfred Nobel and dynamite, Marie Curie and radium, and Alexander Fleming and penicillin. Usually chaotic-serendipitous observations are either not recognized by hypothesis-driven researchers or, if observed, rejected by them. Fortunately, the Naval Blood Research Laboratory (NBRL) has been able to embrace important chaotic and serendipitous observations that were critical to the productivity of the laboratory. As former director of the NBRL, C. Robert Valeri, MD, spent forty-five years exploring hematocrit, bleeding time, and nonsurgical blood loss, as well as other blood-related advances used to treat military and civilian personnel. In this volume, he reviews those advances and recalls his time at the NBRL.< Less