Search Results: 'Security Sector Reform'

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10 results for "Security Sector Reform"
Security Sector Reform In Liberia: Mixed Results From Humble Beginnings By Strategic Studies Institute, Mark Malan
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The reform and the democratic control of the security sector—and the joining together of security and development—have become a major focus of international intervention into... More > post-conflict societies. In theory, security sector reform (SSR) programs derive from a comprehensive national defense and security review. They involve, at the core, the transformation of a country’s military and police forces—but they also involve a comprehensive review and restructuring of intelligence services, the penitentiary, the judiciary, and other agencies charged in some way with preserving and promoting the safety and security of the state and its citizenry. However, the process of SSR in Liberia, supported by the United Nations, the United States, and a number of bilateral donors, is far more rudimentary than the conceptual paradigm suggests. It is aimed simply at the training and equipping of the army and the police, with little attention or resources being devoted to the other components of the security system.< Less
Security Sector Reform: A Case Study Approach to Transition and Capacity Building By Sarah Meharg, Aleisha Arnusch, Susan Merrill
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The authors explore the definition of Security sector reform (SSR) as it has emerged in the international community. The makeup of the security sector is examined, principles are identified for... More > implementing SSR, and outcomes SSR is intended to produce are specified. Supporting case studies assess specific SSR programs. The authors conclude that those conducting SSR programs must understand and continually revisit the policy goals of SSR programs so as to develop concepts that support a transitional process that moves forward over time. State actors must acknowledge and often accommodate nonstate security actors more effectively in SSR planning and implementation, while recognizing both the advantages and the risks of collaborating with such actors. The authors also note the need for more flexible and better integrated funding processes. (Originally published by the Strategic Studies Institute.)< Less
The Prospects for Security Sector Reform in Tunisia: A Year after the Revolution (Enlarged Edition) By Querine Hanlon, U.S. Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute
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The Arab Spring began in Tunisia. The tragic self-immolation of Mohammed Bouazizi in December 2010 struck a chord of discontent and frustration that ultimately propelled Tunisian President Zine El... More > Abidine Ben Ali to step down barely a month later. The reverberations of this unprecedented series of events were felt throughout the region, and protestors took to the streets in Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Syria, and Yemen. A year later, Tunisia’s remarkable transition continues to influence the region. Tunisia has achieved in 1 year what none of the other Arab Spring states have been able to accomplish. Some have suggested that Tunisia’s transition might even be a model for the Arab Spring countries. The Tunisian military’s refusal to ire on the demonstrators and its decision to eschew an overtly political role in the transition have left the task of creating a new political order in Tunisia to the civilian bureaucracy, nascent political parties, and civil society groups.< Less
A Case Study in Security Sector Reform: Learning from Security Sector Reform / Building in Afghanistan (October 2002-September 2003) [Enlarged Edition] By Strategic Studies Institute, Jason C. Howk
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This paper provides a case study to help explain the SSR concepts that were recently formalized in U.S. Army Field Manual 3.07, "Stability Operations Doctrine." It provides insights into... More > how the military interacts with host-nation governments, the United Nations, the State Department, and national embassies to solve today’s complex problems. The author’s experience revealed many pitfalls in security sector building and international team-building that we are trying to avoid today. The author points out the synergy that was lost because of a lack of coordination and understanding between government officials and nongovernmental organizations like aid groups, academia, and think tanks.< Less
The transformation of the south african security sector By Sandy Africa
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South Africa, Security Sector Reform
The transformation of the south african security sector By Sandy Africa
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South Africa, Security Sector Reform
Security Sector Reform: A Case Study Approach to Transition and Capacity Building (Enlarged Edition) By Strategic Studies Institute et al.
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The authors explore the definition of SSR as it has emerged in the international community. The makeup of the security sector is examined, emergent principles are identified for implementing SSR in... More > the community of practice, and the outcomes that SSR is designed to produce are specified. The supporting case studies of Haiti, Liberia, and Kosovo assess the impact of SSR programs on host nation security sectors. The authors conclude that those conducting SSR programs must understand and continually revisit the policy goals of SSR programs so as to develop concepts that support a transitional process that moves forward over time. Intermediate objectives required in support of this transition also articulate what is good enough and fair enough at various stages in the transformational process. State actors must acknowledge and often accommodate nonstate security actors more effectively in SSR planning and implementation, while recognizing both the advantages and the risks of collaborating with such actors.< Less
Creating a Trusted Network for Homeland Security: Second Report of the Markle Foundation Task Force By The Markle Foundation
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The Markle Task Force on National Security in the Information Age provides guidelines and recommendations for the creation and implementation of a trusted information sharing network for homeland... More > security. The Markle Task Force wrote, "In this report, we reaffirm the principles of our first report and offer greater detail on how we believe the government should create networks for information collection, sharing, analysis, and use across federal, state, and local agencies and the private sector, while preserving—and even enhancing—privacy and other civil liberties."< Less
Building Better Armies: An Insider’s Account of Liberia By Sean McFate, Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College
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Recent events in Mali, Libya, Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, and elsewhere demonstrate that building professional indigenous forces is imperative to regional stability, yet few success stories exist.... More > Liberia is a qualified “success,” and this study explores how it was achieved by the program’s chief architect. Liberia suffered a 14-year civil war replete with human rights atrocities that killed 250,000 people and displaced a third of its population. Following President Charles Taylor’s exile in 2003, the U.S. contracted DynCorp International to demobilize and rebuild the Armed Forces of Liberia and its Ministry of Defense; the first time in 150 years that one sovereign nation hired a private company to raise another sovereign nation’s military. This monograph explores the theory and practice behind the successful disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) of the legacy military and security sector reform (SSR) that built the new one.< Less
The Government Assistance Center: A Vehicle for Transitioning to the Host Government By Raymond A. Millen et al.
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The international community needs to take a new approach regarding assistance and development ventures for fragile states. Few would quarrel with the view that current methods are incredibly... More > expensive, wasteful, susceptible to corruption and less than effective in the long run. Much is written about the necessity of Security Sector Reform, Disaster Response, and Humanitarian Assistance as the means to lifting struggling states out of the pit of despair. However, the vast majority of the literature only numbs the reader with laundry lists of goals, considerations, and requirements; little is written on how to organize the assistance effort. There is also a large assumption, not borne out by practice, that cooperation and coordination among states, among organizations, and even among domestic agencies are frictionless if they all share a common goal.< Less