Search Results: 'Signalized Intersection'

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10 results for "Signalized Intersection"
Improving Walkability Through Control Strategies at Signalized Intersections By Sirisha Kothuri
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16. Abstract As cities and communities nationwide seek to develop Complete Streets that foster livability and accommodate all modes, signal timing control strategies that include pedestrians in the... More > operational decision process are gaining importance. This research tested several efficiency-focused pedestrian treatments – coordination, actuated-coordination, free operation, short cycle lengths – and safety-focused treatment including leading pedestrian intervals and Barnes Dance. Using a software-in-the-loop simulation, the operational impacts of these treatments on all users (vehicles, heavy vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians) at an intersection were evaluated. Results showed that among the efficiency-based treatments, free operation was most beneficial for reducing minor-street pedestrian delays. Both safety treatments increased major-street vehicle delays.< Less
OTREC-RR-13-02 By Chris Monsere, David Hurwitz
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Some protected left-turn phasing has been replaced with a flashing yellow arrow (FYA) for protected/permissive left turns. It is important to understand the conflict between pedestrians and the... More > left-turning vehicle. This report summarizes research using a high-fidelity, motion-based driving simulator and eye-tracking equipment to study the effects of opposing traffic, the number and vector of pedestrians, and the number of section heads displaying the FYA on driver performance. 27 subjects completed a six-intersection course, allowing analysis of 620 left-turn maneuvers. More pedestrians led drivers to focus more on crossing pedestrians; with more opposing vehicles, drivers focused less on pedestrians; 5-11% of drivers did not focus on pedestrians in the crosswalk; and no difference was found between any variable and the presence of a three- or four-section head. The results suggest it may be desirable to limit the FYA when pedestrians are present, and that the cost of four-section heads is not justified.< Less
OTREC-RR-13-02 By Chris Monsere, David Hurwitz
Paperback: $5.68
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Some protected left-turn phasing has been replaced with a flashing yellow arrow (FYA) for protected/permissive left turns. It is important to understand the conflict between pedestrians and the... More > left-turning vehicle. This report summarizes research using a high-fidelity, motion-based driving simulator and eye-tracking equipment to study the effects of opposing traffic, the number and vector of pedestrians, and the number of section heads displaying the FYA on driver performance. 27 subjects completed a six-intersection course, allowing analysis of 620 left-turn maneuvers. More pedestrians led drivers to focus more on crossing pedestrians; with more opposing vehicles, drivers focused less on pedestrians; 5-11% of drivers did not focus on pedestrians in the crosswalk; and no difference was found between any variable and the presence of a three- or four-section head. The results suggest it may be desirable to limit the FYA when pedestrians are present, and that the cost of four-section heads is not justified.< Less
OTREC-RR-13-07 By Miguel Figliozzi et al.
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The Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic System (SCATS) is used to mitigate urban traffic congestion. This research combines SCATS research areas including: a) the relationship between SCATS, traffic... More > volumes, and Transit Signal Priority (TSP); b) between TSP and traffic conditions; and c) the correlation between signal timing and air quality. SCATS showed significant speed improvement at a minor intersection, though major intersection results were mixed. Non-priority signals had a greater impact on travel time than priority signals. A regression model of intersection delays showed major intersections with high cross-street volumes are not likely to experience TSP benefits. Signal timing and queuing have a high impact on pedestrian exposure. Longer green times along the main corridor significantly reduced particulate matter, whereas longer street crossing time increased queuing and exposure. Reduced bus idling time and proper bus shelter orientation are likely to reduce pollution exposure significantly.< Less
OTREC-RR-13-07 By Miguel Figliozzi et al.
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The Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic System (SCATS) is used to mitigate urban traffic congestion. This research combines SCATS research areas including: a) the relationship between SCATS, traffic... More > volumes, and Transit Signal Priority (TSP); b) between TSP and traffic conditions; and c) the correlation between signal timing and air quality. SCATS showed significant speed improvement at a minor intersection, though major intersection results were mixed. Non-priority signals had a greater impact on travel time than priority signals. A regression model of intersection delays showed major intersections with high cross-street volumes are not likely to experience TSP benefits. Signal timing and queuing have a high impact on pedestrian exposure. Longer green times along the main corridor significantly reduced particulate matter, whereas longer street crossing time increased queuing and exposure. Reduced bus idling time and proper bus shelter orientation are likely to reduce pollution exposure significantly.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-06 By Jennifer Dill, Christopher Monsere, Nathan McNeil
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This report presents a study of bike boxes at 10 signalized intersections in Portland, OR. Boxes were installed to increase cyclist visibility and reduce conflicts with motor vehicles (MVs). Before... More > and after video were analyzed for seven intersections with green boxes, three intersections with uncolored boxes, and two control intersections. User perceptions were measured via surveys of relevant cyclists and motorists. Both observations and motorist surveys found a high rate of compliance and understanding of the markings. Most stopping MVs did not encroach into the bike box. Both MV and bicycle crosswalk encroachment fell significantly at the box locations. Bike boxes had mixed effects on MV encroachment in the bike lane. Observed conflicts at box locations decreased, while the right turns increased. Observations found an improvement in MVs yielding at the bike box locations. Surveys found the majority of both motorists and cyclists thought the boxes made the intersections safer.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-06 By Jennifer Dill, Christopher Monsere, Nathan McNeil
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This report presents a study of bike boxes at 10 signalized intersections in Portland, OR. Boxes were installed to increase cyclist visibility and reduce conflicts with motor vehicles (MVs). Before... More > and after video were analyzed for seven intersections with green boxes, three intersections with uncolored boxes, and two control intersections. User perceptions were measured via surveys of relevant cyclists and motorists. Both observations and motorist surveys found a high rate of compliance and understanding of the markings. Most stopping MVs did not encroach into the bike box. Both MV and bicycle crosswalk encroachment fell significantly at the box locations. Bike boxes had mixed effects on MV encroachment in the bike lane. Observed conflicts at box locations decreased, while the right turns increased. Observations found an improvement in MVs yielding at the bike box locations. Surveys found the majority of both motorists and cyclists thought the boxes made the intersections safer.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-06 By Jennifer Dill, Christopher Monsere, Nathan McNeil
Paperback: $5.70
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This report presents a study of bike boxes at 10 signalized intersections in Portland, OR. Boxes were installed to increase cyclist visibility and reduce conflicts with motor vehicles (MVs). Before... More > and after video were analyzed for seven intersections with green boxes, three intersections with uncolored boxes, and two control intersections. User perceptions were measured via surveys of relevant cyclists and motorists. Both observations and motorist surveys found a high rate of compliance and understanding of the markings. Most stopping MVs did not encroach into the bike box. Both MV and bicycle crosswalk encroachment fell significantly at the box locations. Bike boxes had mixed effects on MV encroachment in the bike lane. Observed conflicts at box locations decreased, while the right turns increased. Observations found an improvement in MVs yielding at the bike box locations. Surveys found the majority of both motorists and cyclists thought the boxes made the intersections safer.< Less
OTREC-RR-11-06 By Jennifer Dill, Christopher Monsere, Nathan McNeil
eBook (PDF): $0.00
This report presents a study of bike boxes at 10 signalized intersections in Portland, OR. Boxes were installed to increase cyclist visibility and reduce conflicts with motor vehicles (MVs). Before... More > and after video were analyzed for seven intersections with green boxes, three intersections with uncolored boxes, and two control intersections. User perceptions were measured via surveys of relevant cyclists and motorists. Both observations and motorist surveys found a high rate of compliance and understanding of the markings. Most stopping MVs did not encroach into the bike box. Both MV and bicycle crosswalk encroachment fell significantly at the box locations. Bike boxes had mixed effects on MV encroachment in the bike lane. Observed conflicts at box locations decreased, while the right turns increased. Observations found an improvement in MVs yielding at the bike box locations. Surveys found the majority of both motorists and cyclists thought the boxes made the intersections safer.< Less
Exploiting New Data Sources to Quantify Arterial Congestion and Performance Measures at a Regional Scale By Miguel Figliozzi
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Travel time and operating speed influence transit service attractiveness, operating cost and system efficiency. As part of their bus dispatch system (BDS), the Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation... More > District of Oregon (TriMet) has been archiving automatic vehicle location (AVL) and automatic passenger count (APC) data for all bus trips at the stop level since 1997. In 2014, a new and higher-resolution bus AVL data collection system was fully implemented. The new AVL system provides stop-level data as well as five-second resolution (5-SR) bus position data between stops. This research project explored potential applications of the new data for assessing transit performance and for estimating transportation system performance measures for urban streets and arterials. Results suggest that the 5-SR data provides high-resolution time and position information which can be used to determine bus travel speeds between bus stops, identify speed breakdowns, and estimate intersection signal/queuing delays.< Less