Search Results: 'South Carolina Constitution'

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4 results for "South Carolina Constitution"
Constitution of the State of South Carolina By State of South Carolina
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We, the people of the State of South Carolina, in Convention assembled, grateful to God for our liberties, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the preservation and perpetuation of the same.
Chapter 5 - The State of Black South Carolina: A Broken Covenant: South Carolina’s Failure to Educate Its Children By Columbia Urban League
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In “A Broken Covenant: South Carolina’s Failure to Educate Its Children,” Stephen G. Morrison, attorney, summarizes his argument as representative of the plaintiffs from rural... More > school districts that sued the state for failure to meet the state Constitution’s requirement that each child be given a “minimally adequate” education. He supports his case using low standardized test scores, high dropout rates, and poor school facilities in the districts. “Our children are failing because South Carolina has systematically denied adequate public schools to the poorest, mostly rural, predominantly African American communities,” he concludes.< Less
A Historical Account of the Rise and Progress of the Colonies of South Carolina and Georgia By Alexander Hewatt
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Originally published in 1779, this classic work contains an exceedingly detailed account of the histories of the colonies of South Carolina and Georgia. Although the original text was published in... More > two separate volumes, this edition has combined both into one large publication. The substantial work details early American colonization and the first proprietors of the colonies, the hardships faced by the new settlers, the fundamental constitutions and early government, conflicts with England and France and some events of the Revolution.< Less
No Taxation without Representation By Henry M. Gladney
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The most eloquent and effective colonial taxation protest was a 1768 missive from Virginia to the British Government. This PMR (Petition to His Majesty, Memorial to the House of Lords, and... More > Remonstrance to the House of Commons) was issued by the House of Burgesses (the elected Virginia Assembly), whose members included Washington and Jefferson. Virginia sent a PMR copy to every other colonial assembly, stimulating similar protests from Georgia, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Carolina, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and South Carolina (some copying the wording). PMR led directly to the Declaration of Independence.< Less