Search Results: 'Third Battle Ypres'

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3 results for "Third Battle Ypres"
Buried in his uniform - How Marc Noble fought and died in World War I By Magnus Spence
Paperback: $9.46
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Boesinghe, near Ypres, July 1st 1917. Marc Noble, although only two years out of school, was now an experienced artillery officer helping to run a Brigade of 800 men. They were playing their part... More > in the largest barrage ever launched during which 3 million shells were fired. A similar number were fired back. Marc’s dugout received a direct hit. He survived and went for help but he was hit again. This is the story of how Marc Noble fought and died in World War 1. My grandfather was Noble's cousin. I wrote this for family, but it may also be of interest to others wanting a new perspective on life as an artillery officer at the Battles of the Somme and Third Battle of Ypres.< Less
Those Dark Days - A Grenadier's story 1915-1919 By Magnus Spence
Paperback: $17.22
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The unusual First World War story of Patrick Magnus Spence, a Grenadier Guards officer who survived three years of intense action - five major battles including The Somme and Third Battle of Ypres.... More > Based on original notes and trench maps, it describes his experiences in colour (and sold at cost price) using over 50 illustrations laid out on big A4 pages. I am Spence's grandson, and I wrote this for family, but it may also be of interest to others wanting a new perspective on what one of Spence's soldiers called 'those dark days'.< Less
Father William Doyle S.J. By Professor Alfred O'Rahilly
Paperback: $25.00
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The Irish military chaplain Father William Doyle S.J. (1873-1917) combined humour, holiness and courage in an outstanding degree. His death during the third battle of Ypres left intact for posterity... More > the detailed spiritual diaries in which he had recorded for private use his methodical and gruelling path of self-conquest and the growth of his passionate love of Christ. Providence furnished him as biographer the most learned Irishman of his generation: his friend Professor Alfred O’Rahilly. The resulting biography is a compulsively readable and revealing exploration of sanctity under the microscope, by an author whose calm judgement never falters. Father Doyle had devoted his life to the preaching of parish missions and had received the extraordinary grace of never once failing to obtain the conversion of the straying sheep, even hardened sinners, he sought out. But the grace he most yearned for was martyrdom, and he finally won his palm on the bloodiest battlefield of history.< Less