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588 results for "War College"
How the Army Runs: A Senior Leader Reference Handbook, 2011-2012 By U.S. Army War College
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The U.S. Army War College (USAWC) is proud to present the 28th Edition of How the Army Runs: A Senior Leader Reference Handbook, 2011-2012. Publication of this text at this time, when the Army has... More > been at war for almost a decade, has almost completed restructuring of its operating force, and is addressing the structure of the generating force, as well as completing formidable base closure and restationing actions, gives credence to the enduring truth that in order to be successful the Army must sustain and improve itself while it is fully committed to the Nation's bidding. The systems and processes documented and explained in this work are designed to do just that. This text was prepared under the direction of the faculty of the Department of Command, Leadership, and Management. It is intended to be used in an academic environment during the study of the systems and processes used to develop and sustain trained and ready combat forces to be used by the Combatant Commanders.< Less
U.S. Army War College Key Strategic Issues List - Part I: Army Priorities for Strategic Analysis [Academic Year 2013-14] (Enlarged Edition) By Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College
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For over a decade, SSI has published the annual Key Strategic Issues List (KSIL) to inform students, faculty, and external research associates of strategic topics requiring research and analysis.... More > Part I of the Academic Year (AY) 2013-14 KSIL, referred to as the Army Priorities for Strategic Analysis (APSA), has been developed by Headquarters Department of the Army (HQDA) and SSI. The APSA will help prioritize strategic research and analysis conducted by USAWC students and faculty, USAWC Fellows, and external researchers, to link their research efforts and results more effectively to HQDA’s highest priority topics. To improve the relevance of the research and analysis, topics are directly linked to chiefs or points of contact (POC) within appropriate HQDA divisions or directorates. These POCs will advise researchers as to specific topics and results needed to better shape research, analysis, and results that meet the Army’s needs. NOTE: Topics with (***) are priority Chief of Staff of the Army topics.< Less
Cyber Infrastructure Protection: Volume II (Enlarged Edition) By U.S. Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute
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Increased reliance on the Internet and other networked systems raise the risks of cyber attacks that could harm our nation’s cyber infrastructure. The cyber infrastructure encompasses a number... More > of sectors including the nation’s mass transit and other transportation systems, banking and financial systems, factories, energy systems and the electric power grid, and telecommunications, which increasingly rely on a complex array of computer networks, including the public Internet. However, many of these systems and networks were not built and designed with security in mind. Therefore, our cyber infrastructure contains many holes, risks, and vulnerabilities that may enable an attacker to cause damage or disrupt cyber infrastructure operations. Threats to cyber infrastructure safety and security come from hackers, terrorists, criminal groups, and sophisticated organized crime groups; even nation-states and foreign intelligence services conduct cyber warfare.< Less
Sustaining the Peace After Civil War By T. David Mason, Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College
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Since the end of World War II, there have been four times as many civil wars as interstate wars. For a small subset of nations civil war is a chronic condition: about half of the civil war nations... More > have had at least two and as many as six conflicts. This book presents an analytical framework that has been used to identify a set of factors that make civil war more or less likely to recur in a nation where a civil war has recently terminated. The outcome of the previous civil war--whether it ended in a government victory, a rebel victory or a negotiated settlement--as well as the duration and deadliness of the conflict affect the durability of the peace after civil war. The introduction of peacekeeping forces, investment in economic development and reconstruction, and the establishment of democratic political institutions tailored to the configuration of ethnic and religious cleavages in the society also affect the durability of peace after civil war.< Less
U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Issues: Volume II - National Security Policy and Strategy (5th Edition) By J. Boone Bartholomees, Jr., U.S. Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute
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This edition of the U. S. Army War College Guide to National Security Policy and Strategy continues to reflect the structure and approach of the core national security strategy and policy curriculum... More > at the War College. The fifth edition is published in two volumes that correspond roughly to the Department of National Security and Strategy's core courses.< Less
Preparing for One War and Getting Another? (Enlarged Edition) By Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, Antulio J. Echevarria II
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This monograph examines the fundamental argument that America's adversaries are shifting more toward irregular methods due to the demonstrated prowess of the U.S. military at conventional warfare.... More > This argument is based on a what one might call a paradoxical logic, not unlike that described by Edward Luttwak in his classic work, Strategy. Among other things, the monograph concludes that few genuine paradoxes exist in war; most principles that appear paradoxical are completely linear. Moreover, those adversarial states and nonstate actors employing irregular methods today were doing so long before the U.S. military demonstrated its superiority at conventional warfare, and will likely continue to do so.< Less
The Real “Long War”: The Illicit Drug Trade and the Role of The Military (Enlarged Edition) By Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, Geoffrey Till
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The 21st century has seen the growth of a number of nontraditional threats to the international stability on which trade, and thus U.S. peace and security, depends, and for the moment at least a... More > reduced likelihood of continental scale warfighting operations, and something of a de-emphasis on major involvement in counterinsurgency operations. These nontraditional threats are, however, very real and should command a higher priority than they have done, even in a period of budgetary constraint. The military have cost-effective contributions to make in countering the manufacture and distribution of illicit drugs, and in many cases can do so without serious detriment to their main warfighting task. Successfully completing this mission, however, will require the military to rethink their integration with the nonmilitary aspects of a whole-of-government approach and almost certainly their institutional preference for speedy victories in short wars.< Less
Chinese Lessons from other Peoples’ Wars [Enlarged Edition] By Andrew Scobell et al.
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The importance of China stems not only from its current international role and its influence on the Asia-Pacific region in particular, but also because China’s impact on global developments... More > will likely continue to grow. One of our enduring imperatives is to accurately survey China’s experiences as a means to grasp its existing perceptions, motivations, and ambitions. More than ever, solid, evidence-based evaluation of what the PLA has learned from the use of force and conflict elsewhere in the world is needed to shed light on the prospects for its cooperation, or rivalry, with the international community. This volume provides unique, valuable insights on how the PLA has applied the lessons learned from others’ military actions to its own strategic planning.< Less
The Role of Small States in the Post-cold War Era: The Case of Belarus (Enlarged Edition) By Dmitry Shlapentokh, Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College
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The United States is not the only global center as it was in the first years of post-Cold War era. Nor are there just two superpowers–the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist... More > Republics–that define the course of global events. The new multipolarity implies the presence of several centers of power that will provide the opportunity for small states such as Belorussia to move from one center of power to the other and/or engage in sort of geopolitical “ménage de troix.” During the last 10 years or so, Belorussia moved from Russia to the European Union and back, while at the same time engaging in relationships with Iran and China. While relationships with Russia and the European Union have not been stable, the story is different with China and Iran. Belorussia has always maintained a good relationship with both countries, especially with China. This demonstrates the increasing role of Asia in geopolitical arrangements now and in the future.< Less
The Promise and Pitfalls of Grand Strategy (Enlarged Edition) By Hal Brands, Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College
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What is “grand strategy,” and why is it seemingly so important and so difficult? This monograph explores the concept of grand strategy as it has developed over the past several decades.... More > It explains why the concept is so ubiquitous in discussions of present-day foreign policy, examines why American officials often find the formulation of a successful grand strategy to be such an exacting task, and explores the ways in which having a grand strategy can be both useful and problematic. It illustrates these points via an analysis of two key periods in modern American grand strategy—the Truman years at the outset of the Cold War, and the Nixon-Kissinger years in the late 1960s and 1970s—and provides several suggestions for how U.S. officials might approach the challenges of grand strategy in the 21st century.< Less