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83 results for "anti-slavery"
The Fugitive Slave Law and It's Victims (Illustrated) By American Anti-Slavery Society
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The Fugitive Slave Law was enacted by Congress in September, 1850, received the signature of HOWELL COBB, [of Georgia,] as Speaker of the House of Representatives, of WILLIAM R. KING, [of Alabama,]... More > as President of the Senate, and was "approved," September 18th, of that year, by MILLARD FILLMORE, Acting President of the United States. The authorship of the Bill is generally ascribed to James M. Mason, Senator from Virginia. Before proceeding to the principal object of this tract, it is proper to give a synopsis of the Act itself, which was well called, by the New York _Evening Post_, "An Act for the Encouragement of Kidnapping." It is in ten sections.< Less
A Condensed Anti-Slavery Bible Argument: By a Citizen of Virginia By George Bourne
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IN order the better to understand the subject it is necessary here to introduce a few plain definitions. Slavery has two definitions--the direct and the indirect. The first of these is that it is the... More > total deprivation of human rights; the other that it is the reducing of human beings to the condition of property, the same as other goods, wares, merchandise and chattels. Either of these definitions will answer for the purpose of argument, though the latter is to be preferred, because it is the most familiar. There are a variety of other ways in which mankind hold control over each other, and sometimes unjustly and oppressively; but if the persons controlled be not held as property, they are not slaves.< Less
JOHN BROWN, EMANCIPATOR By Louis A. DeCaro, Jr.
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Collection of essays by Louis A. DeCaro, Jr., a student of the life and letters of the abolitionist John Brown. These essays first appeared on the author's online publication, "John Brown the... More > Abolitionist: A Biographer's Blog," and have been edited and presented here with new, extended critical introduction.< Less
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave By Frederick Douglass
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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is an 1845 memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and former slave Frederick Douglass. It is generally held to be the most famous of a... More > number of narratives written by former slaves during the same period. In factual detail, the text describes the events of his life and is considered to be one of the most influential pieces of literature to fuel the abolitionist movement of the early 19th century in the United States.< Less
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt) Du Bois
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The Souls of Black Folk is a classic work of American literature by W. E. B. Du Bois. It is a seminal work in the history of sociology, and a cornerstone of African-American literary history. Du... More > Bois drew from his own experiences as an African-American in the American society. Outside of its notable relevance in African-American history, The Souls of Black Folk also holds an important place in social science as one of the early works in the field of sociology. The book's import to African Americans was comparable to that of Uncle Tom's Cabin.< Less
SLAVE NARRATIVES Volume 5 By ARKANSAS CHAPTER 6
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“I come to dis state in 1885. I run off from my parents back in North Carolina. They was working in a turpentine forest there. “When freedom was declared my folks heard ‘bout a... More > place where money was easy to make. So they walked from down close to Charleston up there and carried the children. I was ‘bout nine or ten years old. I liked the farm so I left the turpentine farm. I got to rambling round and finally got to Arkansas. I run off from my folks cause they kept staying there. I was a child and don’t recollect much ‘bout slavery. I was at the quarters wid all the children. My mother b’longed to Bob Plat and my father to a man named Rogers. My father could get a pass and come to see us every Sunday providin’ he didn’t go nowhere else or stop long the road. He came early and stay till bedtime. We all run to meet him. He kiss us all in bed when he be leavin’.< Less
SLAVE NARRATIVES Volume 5 By ARKANSAS CHAPTER 6
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“I come to dis state in 1885. I run off from my parents back in North Carolina. They was working in a turpentine forest there. “When freedom was declared my folks heard ‘bout a... More > place where money was easy to make. So they walked from down close to Charleston up there and carried the children. I was ‘bout nine or ten years old. I liked the farm so I left the turpentine farm. I got to rambling round and finally got to Arkansas. I run off from my folks cause they kept staying there. I was a child and don’t recollect much ‘bout slavery. I was at the quarters wid all the children. My mother b’longed to Bob Plat and my father to a man named Rogers. My father could get a pass and come to see us every Sunday providin’ he didn’t go nowhere else or stop long the road. He came early and stay till bedtime. We all run to meet him. He kiss us all in bed when he be leavin’.< Less
SLAVE NARRATIVES Volume 4 By ARKANSAS CHAPTER 3
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Person interviewed: Ida Harper 819 West Pullen Street; Pine Bluff, Arkansas Age: 93 “Now what you want with me? I was born in Mississippi. I come here tollable young. I’se ninety-three... More > now. “My old master mean to us. We used to watch for him to come in the big gate, then we run and hide. He used to come to the quarters and make us chillun sing. He make us sing Dixie. Sometimes he make us sing half a day. Seems like Dixie his main song. I tell you I don’t like it now. But have mercy! He make us sing it. Seems like all the white folks like Dixie. I’se glad when he went away to war. “But they used to feed you. Heap better meat than you get now. I tell you they had things to eat in them days. “I ’member when the soldiers was comin’ through and runnin’ the white folks both ways. Law chile—you don’t know nothin’! We used to hide in the cistern. One time when the Yankees come in a rush my brother and me hide in the feather bed.< Less
SLAVE NARRATIVES Volume 6 By ARKANSAS CHAPTER 7
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Interviewer: Mrs. Bernice Bowden Person interviewed: John Young 923 E. Fifteenth, Pine Bluff, Arkansas Age: 89 “I know I was born in Arkansas. The first place I recollect I was in... More > Arkansas. “I was a drummer in the Civil War. I played the little drum. The bass drummer was Rheuben Turner. “I run off from home in Drew County. Five or six of us run off here to Pine Bluff. We heard if we could get with the Yankees we’d be free, so we run off here to Pine Bluff and got with some Yankee soldiers—the twenty-eighth Wisconsin. “Then we went to Little Rock and I j’ined the fifty-seventh colored infantry. I thought I was good and safe then. “We went to Fort Smith from Little Rock and freedom come on us while we was between New Mexico and Fort Smith. “They mustered us out at Fort Leavenworth and I went right back to my folks in Drew County, Monticello. “I’ve been a farmer all my life till I got too old.”< Less
SLAVE NARRATIVES Volume 3 By ARKANSAS CHAPTER 5
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“I seed the Ku Klux. We colored folks had to make it here to Pine Bluff to the county band. If the Rebels kotch you, you was dead. “Oh Lord yes, I voted. I voted the Publican ticket, they... More > called it. You know they had this Australia ballot. You was sposed to go in the caboose and vote. They like to scared me to death one time. I had a description of the man I wanted to vote for in my pocket and I was lookin’ at it so I’d be sure to vote for the right man and they caught me. They said, ‘What you doin’ there? We’re goin’ to turn you over to the sheriff after election!’ They had me scared to death. I hid out for a long time till I seed they wasn’t goin’ to do nothin’. “My wife’s brother was one of the judges of the election. Some of the other colored folks was constables and magistrates—some of em are now—down in the country.< Less