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11 results for "greek etymology"
Building English Vocabulary with Etymology from Greek Book IV By Peter Beaven
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Etymology is the study of word origins and development. It provides one of the easiest and most effective ways to build vocabulary, because knowledge of some common roots and prefixes makes possible... More > the figuring out of new word meanings. English is compounded of several languages, primarily Anglo-Saxon (Germanic) and Latin. Their Latin influence persists notably in the names of English cities ending in “-caster” or “-chester,” from the Latin “castra” meaning “encampment.” This is the fourth book of a series that focuses on etymology from Latin and Greek. This book focuses on Greek roots. The texts are designed to aid in learning the definitions of specific, deconstructed words. The meanings of a series of “reusable” classical prefixes and roots are presented that facilitate the deciphering of multiple related words.< Less
Building English Vocabulary With Etymology Introduction By Peter Beaven
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Etymology is the study of word origins and development. It provides one of the easiest and most effective ways to build vocabulary, because knowledge of some common roots and prefixes makes possible... More > the figuring out of new word meanings. English is compounded of several languages, primarily Anglo-Saxon (Germanic) and Latin. Historically, the Angles and Saxon tribes occupied Britain after expelling the Celts to Ireland. Beginning in the first century BCE, Julius Caesar’s legions conquered and occupied Britain, and Roman troops remained until the fifth century. Their Latin influence persists notably in the names of English cities ending in “-caster” or “-chester,” from the Latin “castra” meaning “encampment.” This series of books focuses then on etymology from Latin and Greek. The texts are designed to aid in learning the definitions of specific, deconstructed words.< Less
Building English Vocabulary with Etymology from Latin Book I By Peter Beaven
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Etymology is the study of word origins and development. It provides one of the easiest and most effective ways to build vocabulary, because knowledge of some common roots and prefixes makes possible... More > the figuring out of new word meanings. English is compounded of several languages, primarily Anglo-Saxon (Germanic) and Latin. Their Latin influence persists notably in the names of English cities ending in “-caster” or “-chester,” from the Latin “castra” meaning “encampment.” This is the first book of a series that focuses on etymology from Latin and Greek. The texts are designed to aid in learning the definitions of specific, deconstructed words. The meanings of a series of “reusable” classical prefixes and roots are presented that facilitate the deciphering of multiple related words.< Less
Building English Vocabulary with Etymology from Latin Book II By Peter Beaven
Paperback: $35.00
Prints in 3-5 business days
Etymology is the study of word origins and development. It provides one of the easiest and most effective ways to build vocabulary, because knowledge of some common roots and prefixes makes possible... More > the figuring out of new word meanings. English is compounded of several languages, primarily Anglo-Saxon (Germanic) and Latin. Their Latin influence persists notably in the names of English cities ending in “-caster” or “-chester,” from the Latin “castra” meaning “encampment.” This is the second book of a series that focuses on etymology from Latin and Greek. The texts are designed to aid in learning the definitions of specific, deconstructed words. The meanings of a series of “reusable” classical prefixes and roots are presented that facilitate the deciphering of multiple related words.< Less
Building English Vocabulary with Etymology from Latin Book III By Peter Beaven
Paperback: $35.00
Prints in 3-5 business days
Etymology is the study of word origins and development. It provides one of the easiest and most effective ways to build vocabulary, because knowledge of some common roots and prefixes makes possible... More > the figuring out of new word meanings. English is compounded of several languages, primarily Anglo-Saxon (Germanic) and Latin. Their Latin influence persists notably in the names of English cities ending in “-caster” or “-chester,” from the Latin “castra” meaning “encampment.” This is the third book of a series that focuses on etymology from Latin and Greek. The texts are designed to aid in learning the definitions of specific, deconstructed words. The meanings of a series of “reusable” classical prefixes and roots are presented that facilitate the deciphering of multiple related words.< Less
A Dictionary of the Roots and Combining Forms of Scientific Words By Tim Williams
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Have you ever wondered where scientific words and names come from? Why are honey bees known as ‘Apis mellifera’, why is a daisy known as ‘Bellis perennis'? If you are curious about... More > words you can use this book to find out exactly what ‘artiodactyl’ means, what an ‘ectoloph’ is and where you can find ‘Cantium’. There are over 12,800 entries, plus directions for using the word-roots, pronunciation rules, guidance for constructing scientific names and general principles of transliteration. Additionally there are appendices listing the adjectival forms of geographical names; some common terms for animals, plants and structures, activities and habitats; shapes, sizes, colors, textures, patterns, numbers, quantity, direction and location, parts of the year and chemical elements. This dictionary will be especially useful to students from many fields and particularly those from medical and biological backgrounds, as well as being a valuable addition to any reference collection. www.trw-books.com< Less
LOGIC MADE SIMPLE By Prof. A. V. Nama
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The foundation of logic was laid by Aristotle in the 4th century B.C. i.e. called Aristotelian Logic. Etymologically, the termLogic came from the Greek word ‘Logos’ means discourse of... More > thought. But any thought is not an object of the study of logic because thinking is one of the processes studied by psychologists. Logic is not concerned with the thinking process. It is not a branch of psychology. Logic studies only that variety of thinking which is called ‘Inference’( Reasoning or Argument ).< Less
TWO By Eric Arthur Ross
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A compendium of mathematical and Religious coincidence. Aside from One, two has been the most difficult of all the numbers to expound; and perhaps the deepest of all the mysteries in the world is how... More > it emerged from the One. For example, in the Hebrew language there is not a separate set of numbers, but every letter is represented as a number. Everything that can be summed up in a word will likewise have a numerical value which falls into the realm of Gematria. The etymology of the world Gematria stems from a Greek word meaning geometry. It can also be compounded with the word for writing. It is the system of relating words with similar numerical values in a show of harmony between math and nature. Unity can only be manifested by the Binary. Buddha said that Unity itself and the idea of Unity are already two, as if to say that duality is very glue of our reality, and apart from it the 'One' is incomprehensible, timeless, and boundless. Everything abides in it, including the 'One'.< Less
A Dictionary for Invertebrate Zoology By Tim Williams
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This reference work is the most comprehensive and up to date dictionary for invertebrate zoology currently available. The 21,500 entries cover etymology, invertebrate anatomy, biology, reproduction... More > and provide an extensive taxonomic coverage of the 36 invertebrate phyla down to the level of family, including numerous subfamilies and many species that are of particular interest. Invertebrate zoology is not studied in isolation and thus the 704 pages contain many terms that one would normally come across from the related fields of Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Ecology, Earth History, Genetics, Paleontology, Physiology, Taxonomy and Zoogeography. There is also a brief introduction to scientific Latin and Greek and an appendix giving an outline classification of the animal kingdom. This dictionary is the standard reference for students and will also be invaluable for naturalists and all those with an interest in invertebrate zoology. For more details and previews see www.trw-books.com< Less
A Dictionary for Invertebrate Zoology By Tim Williams
eBook (ePub): $17.99
This reference work is the most comprehensive and up to date dictionary for invertebrate zoology currently available. The 21,500 entries cover etymology, invertebrate anatomy, biology, reproduction... More > and provide an extensive taxonomic coverage of the 36 invertebrate phyla down to the level of family, including numerous subfamilies and many species that are of particular interest. Invertebrate zoology is not studied in isolation and thus the 704 pages contain many terms that one would normally come across from the related fields of Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Ecology, Earth History, Genetics, Paleontology, Physiology, Taxonomy and Zoogeography. There is also a brief introduction to scientific Latin and Greek and an appendix giving an outline classification of the animal kingdom. This dictionary is the standard reference for students and will also be invaluable for naturalists and all those with an interest in invertebrate zoology.< Less