Search Results: 'humanitarian aid program'

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2 results for "humanitarian aid program"
The Bach Mai Hospital Project By Carl E. Bartecchi, MD
Hardcover: $32.95
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Merriam Press Modern History 1. First Edition (March 2013). Dr. Bartecchi served in the U.S. Army as a Flight Surgeon during the Vietnam War and in addition to caring for wounded troops, he organized... More > medical forays by helicopter to towns throughout the Mekong Delta. During his tour in Vietnam, working so closely with the civilian population, he developed an admiration and respect for the resilient and proud Vietnamese people. In the mid-1990s, Bartecchi became involved with assisting the Bach Mai Hospital improve their facility and providing training for the doctors, nurses and staff there, including exchanges of medical personnel between Bach Mai Hospital and American hospitals, as well as arranging for assistance in the area of medical equipment and supplies, donated by organizations and corporations. This book provides the background to this story. 77 photos.< Less
The Search For Accountability And Transparency In Plan Colombia: Reforming Judicial Institutions—Again By Luz Estella Nagle
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The intention of the U.S. Army War College and The Dante B. Fascell North-South Center has been to elucidate as broadly as possible the many facets of the Colombian dilemma, the worst security... More > problem which the Western Hemisphere faces today. This monograph concerns the challenge to reform Colombian judicial institutions. Plan Colombia carries with it, by the reckoning of President Andrés Pastrana’s government, a $7.5 billion price tag. The United States has committed $1.3 billion to the effort, largely in military aid, antinarcotics programs, and the equipment and training that go with them. Europe is supposed to provide $1 billion in humanitarian aid, social programs, and other nonmilitary assistance, but its money has not been forthcoming. Meanwhile, the United States does, through the United States Agency for International Development, offer a $122 million package for judicial reform and, in fact, has carried out programs of judicial reform in the past.< Less