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7,284 results for "medic"
Complete Medical Guide for Disease Volume X; Epidermolysis Bullosa By Medical Professionals & National Institute of Health
eBook (ePub): $2.99
Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited connective tissue disease causing blisters in the skin and mucosal membranes, with an incidence of 1/50,000. Its severity ranges from mild to lethal. It is... More > caused by a mutation in the integrin α6β4 cell adhesion molecule on either the alpha or beta subunit. As a result, the skin is extremely fragile. Minor mechanical friction or trauma will separate the layers of the skin and form blisters. People with this condition have an increased risk of cancers of the skin, and many will eventually be diagnosed with it as a complication of the chronic damage done to the skin. The condition was brought to public attention in the UK through the Channel 4 documentary The Boy Whose Skin Fell Off, chronicling the life and death of Jonny Kennedy, an English man with EB. In the United States, the same could be said of the HBO documentary My Flesh and Blood from 2003.< Less
Complete Medical Guide for Disease Volume VII; Atopic Dermatitis By Medical Professionals & National Institute of Health
eBook (ePub): $2.99
Atopic dermatitis (AD, a type of eczema) is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, non-contagious and pruritic (that is, itchy) skin disorder. It has been given names like "prurigo... More > Besnier," "neurodermitis," "endogenous eczema," "flexural eczema," "infantile eczema," and "prurigo diathésique". The skin of a patient with atopic dermatitis reacts abnormally and easily to irritants, food, and environmental allergens and becomes red, flaky and very itchy. It also becomes vulnerable to surface infections caused by bacteria. The skin on the flexural surfaces of the joints (for example inner sides of elbows and knees) are the most commonly affected regions in people. Atopic dermatitis often occurs together with other atopic diseases like hay fever, asthma and allergic conjunctivitis. It is a familial and chronic disease and its symptoms can increase or disappear over time.< Less
Complete Medical Guide for Disease Volume VIII; Behcet's Disease By Medical Professionals & National Institute of Health
eBook (ePub): $2.99
Behçet's disease (BEH-chets), sometimes called Behçet's syndrome, Morbus Behçet, or Silk Road disease, is a rare immune-mediated systemic vasculitis that often presents with... More > mucous membrane ulceration and ocular involvements. Behçet's disease (BD) was named in 1937 after the Turkish dermatologist Hulusi Behçet, who first described the triple-symptom complex of recurrent oral aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers, and uveitis. As a systemic disease, it can also involve visceral organs such as the gastrointestinal tract, pulmonary, musculoskeletal, and neurological systems. This syndrome can be fatal due to ruptured vascular aneurysms or severe neurological complications.< Less
Complete Medical Guide for Disease Volume XIII; Growth Plate Injuries By Medical Professionals & National Institute of Health
eBook (ePub): $1.99
The growth plate, also known as the epiphyseal plate or physis, is the area of growing tissue near the ends of the long bones in children and adolescents. Each long bone has at least two growth... More > plates: one at each end. The growth plate determines the future length and shape of the mature bone. When growth is complete—sometime during adolescence—the growth plates close and are replaced by solid bone. Because the growth plates are the weakest areas of the growing skeleton—even weaker than the nearby ligaments and tendons that connect bones to other bones and muscles—they are vulnerable to injury. Injuries to the growth plate are called fractures.< Less
Complete Medical Guide for Disease Volume XV; Joint Replacement By Medical Professionals & National Institute of Health
eBook (ePub): $1.99
Replacement arthroplasty [from Greek arthron, joint, limb, articulate, + -plassein, to form, mould, forge, feign, make an image of], or joint replacement surgery, is a procedure of orthopedic surgery... More > in which the arthritic or dysfunctional joint surface is replaced with an orthopedic prosthesis. Joint replacement is considered as a treatment when severe joint pain or dysfunction is not alleviated by less-invasive therapies. Joint replacement surgery is becoming more common, with knees and hips replaced most often. As of 2009, about 773,000 Americans have a hip or knee replaced each year". In recent decades the most successful and common form of arthroplasty is the surgical replacement of a joint or joint surface with a prosthesis. For example, a hip joint that is affected by osteoarthritis may be replaced entirely (total hip arthroplasty) with a prosthetic hip. This procedure involves replacing both the acetabulum (hip socket) and the head and neck of the femur.< Less
Complete Medical Guide for Disease Volume XIV; Hip Replacement By Medical Professionals & National Institute of Health
eBook (ePub): $1.99
mp to: navigation, search Hip replacement Intervention In this X-ray, the patient’s right hip (left of image) has been replaced, with the ball of this ball-and-socket joint replaced by a metal... More > head that is set in the thighbone or femur and the socket replaced by a white plastic cup (clear in this X-ray). Pelvic anatomy consistent with that of a female (large infrapubic angle, large pelvic opening). ICD-9-CM 81.51–81.53 MeSH D019644 MedlinePlus 002975 Hip replacement is a surgical procedure in which the hip joint is replaced by a prosthetic implant. Hip replacement surgery can be performed as a total replacement or a hemi (half) replacement. Such joint replacement orthopaedic surgery is generally conducted to relieve arthritis pain or fix severe physical joint damage as part of hip fracture treatment. A total hip replacement (total hip arthroplasty) consists of replacing both the acetabulum and the femoral head while hemiarthroplasty generally only replaces the femoral head.< Less
Complete Medical Guide for Disease Volume IX: Connective Tissue By Medical Professionals & National Institute of Health
eBook (ePub): $1.99
"Connective tissue" is a fibrous and most diverse tissue. It is one of the four traditional classes of tissues (the others being epithelial, muscle and nervous tissue). Connective Tissue... More > (CT) is found throughout the body. In fact the whole framework of the skeleton and the different specialized connective tissues from the crown of the head to the toes determine the form of the body and act as an entity. CT has 3 main components: cells, fibers, and extracellular matrix, all embedded in the body fluids. Fibroblasts are the cells responsible for the production of connective tissue. The interaction of the fibers, the extracellular matrix and the water, together, form the pliable connective tissue as a whole. Connective tissue makes up a variety of physical structures including tendons and the connective framework of fibers in muscles, capsules and ligaments around joints, cartilage, bone, adipose tissue, blood and lymphatic tissue.< Less
Complete Medical Guide for Disease Volume XVII; Knee Problems By Medical Professionals & National Institute of Health
eBook (ePub): $2.99
Knee pain is a common complaint for many people. There are several factors that can cause knee pain. Awareness and knowledge of the causes of knee pain lead to a more accurate diagnosis. Management... More > of knee pain is in the accurate diagnosis and effective treatment for that diagnosis. Knee pain can be either referred pain or related to the knee joint itself. A Chinese study concluded that knee pain is significantly more prevalent in people working in cold stores than in those in normal temperature. One study came to the conclusion that 17% of adolescents with anterior knee pain (a common but benign self-limiting condition) report that their pain is associated with cold weather. The same study indicated that the main activities associated with anterior knee pain are sporting, stair climbing and walking, but also sitting. Some people with anterior knee pain tend to have generally colder knees, and such people also trend towards having to wear extra tights/long johns in the winter.< Less
Breastfeeding Quick-Reference Guide By University of Rochester Medical Center - DCPM
eBook (ePub): $0.00
This quick reference guide on breastfeeding is ideal for physicians, nurses, medical students and other health care providers who would like some basic knowledge to help counsel their patients about... More > breastfeeding. It contains information on the benefits of breastfeeding, contraindications, solutions to common problems, helpful tips on positions, as well as normal infant eating and sleeping habits. Additionally it has a short section on New York State Law regarding breastfeeding and a list of resources for parents. This guide was developed by the Department of Community Preventive Medicine at the University of Rochester to help residents and medical students learn how to counsel their patients about breastfeeding.< Less
The Medical Phials By Jack Mellender
Paperback: $10.50
Prints in 3-5 business days
The author describes the lot of a medical transcriptionist before voice-recognition technology.

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