Search Results: 'medieval cookbook'

Search

×
×
×
×
12 results for "medieval cookbook"
The Science of Cooking, a Medieval Transylvanian Cookbook By Glenn F. Gorsuch
Hardcover: $24.99
Prints in 3-5 business days
A translation of The Science of Cooking, a late medieval cookbook from Transylvania, edited for use by reenactors.
The Science of Cooking, a Transylvanian medieval cookbook By Glenn F. Gorsuch
Paperback: $15.99
Prints in 3-5 business days
A translated version of a medieval cookbook. The original manuscript most likely dates to the late 1500's, and the original author is unknown.
How to Cook a Golden Peacock: A Translation of the Medieval Cookbook Enseingnemenz Qui Enseingnent à Apareillier Toutes Manières de Viandes By Jim Chevallier & Anonymous
eBook (ePub): $2.99
This brief medieval cookbook was found centuries after the Viandier, the most famous of the French medieval cookbooks. It was written under Philip the Fair, when meals were supposed to be simpler... More > than in Taillevent's time, and so unlike the later cook's work, it is simply organized by types of food, not different services. Its author was unknown, though he was certainly a professional cook. The foods described include simple fare like beef and pork and more exotic foods like peacock, swan and lamprey; sauces like cameline (cinnamon) are also mentioned along the way. This new translation includes several modern recipes (redactions) based on those in the work, an introduction and extensive notes.< Less
How to Cook a Peacock : Le Viandier - Medieval Recipes from the French Court By Jim Chevallier & Taillevent
eBook (ePub): $4.99
In the fourteenth century, French kings prized such fare as peacock, storks and herons. Guillaume Tirel not only cooked these dishes, he left a book on how to do it. Because (it is said) he had a... More > long sharp nose, he was nicknamed "Taillevent" ("Slice-wind"), and his classic cookbook is often referred to as "Taillevent's Viandier". Le Viandier has survived in at least four different versions. Now Jim Chevallier has translated one of the earliest and most difficult versions - the so-called Fifteenth Century version. This affordable translation makes a precious historical document more readily available to recreational medievalists, food historians and students of medieval life. Luckily, too, many of the dishes listed use familiar ingredients such as chicken, veal, eggs and peas. Adventurous cooks can adapt these original period recipes for modern use, and impress their friends with brewets, pasties, galantines and coulis.< Less
HOW TO COOK A PEACOCK: Le Viandier - Medieval Recipes from the French Court By Guillaume Tirel
eBook (ePub): $4.99
In the fourteenth century, French kings prized such fare as peacock, storks and herons. Guillaume Tirel not only cooked these dishes, he left a book on how to do it. Because (it is said) he had a... More > long sharp nose, he was nicknamed "Taillevent" ("Slice-wind"), and his classic cookbook is often referred to as "Taillevent's Viandier". Le Viandier has survived in at least four different versions. Now Jim Chevallier has translated one of the earliest and most difficult versions - the so-called Fifteenth Century version. This affordable translation makes a precious historical document more readily available to recreational medievalists, food historians and students of medieval life. Luckily, too, many of the dishes listed use familiar ingredients such as chicken, veal, eggs and peas. Adventurous cooks can adapt these original period recipes for modern use, and impress their friends with brewets, pasties, galantines and coulis.< Less
HOW TO COOK A PEACOCK: Le Viandier - Medieval Recipes from the French Court By Guillaume Tirel
eBook (ePub): $4.99
In the fourteenth century, French kings prized such fare as peacock, storks and herons. Guillaume Tirel not only cooked these dishes, he left a book on how to do it. Because (it is said) he had a... More > long sharp nose, he was nicknamed "Taillevent" ("Slice-wind"), and his classic cookbook is often referred to as "Taillevent's Viandier". Le Viandier has survived in at least four different versions. Now Jim Chevallier has translated one of the earliest and most difficult versions - the so-called Fifteenth Century version. This affordable translation makes a precious historical document more readily available to recreational medievalists, food historians and students of medieval life. Luckily, too, many of the dishes listed use familiar ingredients such as chicken, veal, eggs and peas. Adventurous cooks can adapt these original period recipes for modern use, and impress their friends with brewets, pasties, galantines and coulis.< Less
HOW TO COOK A PEACOCK: Le Viandier - Medieval Recipes from the French Court By Guillaume Tirel
eBook (ePub): $4.99
In the fourteenth century, French kings prized such fare as peacock, storks and herons. Guillaume Tirel not only cooked these dishes, he left a book on how to do it. Because (it is said) he had a... More > long sharp nose, he was nicknamed "Taillevent" ("Slice-wind"), and his classic cookbook is often referred to as "Taillevent's Viandier". Le Viandier has survived in at least four different versions. Now Jim Chevallier has translated one of the earliest and most difficult versions - the so-called Fifteenth Century version. This affordable translation makes a precious historical document more readily available to recreational medievalists, food historians and students of medieval life. Luckily, too, many of the dishes listed use familiar ingredients such as chicken, veal, eggs and peas. Adventurous cooks can adapt these original period recipes for modern use, and impress their friends with brewets, pasties, galantines and coulis.< Less
Tried and True Historical Recipes for Home, Camp, and Feast Hall By Eulalia Piebakere
Paperback: $12.00
Prints in 3-5 business days
(1 Ratings)
This cookbook was written for cooks in the Society for Creative Anachronism and for other historical food enthusiasts. It contains easy-to-follow, rigorously tested recipes for a number of dishes... More > appropriate for potlucks, camping, feasts, or just a nice dinner at home. The recipes are based on Eulalia's years of research into and experiments in historical cooking, and span a time period from the Iron Age to the late Renaissance from diverse countries and cultures. This collection also includes notes about ingredients for medieval and Renaissance cooking, including recipes for spice mixes, and some recipes for non-edible but useful household items like soap. Eulalia provides tips for both modern shortcuts and fully-immersive historical cooking using only period-correct tools. Whether you're brand new to historical cooking or a seasoned feast steward, you will hopefully find something of use in this book.< Less
How to Cook an Early French Peacock: De Observatione Ciborum - Roman Food for a Frankish King (Bilingual Second Edition) By Jim Chevallier & Anthimus
eBook (ePub): $3.99
Is Anthimus' work "the oldest European medieval cookbook"? Well, it IS six centuries older than a twelfth century book that has recently been touted as exactly that. In the sixth century... More > an Ostrogoth king sent a Byzantine physician to one of the Frankish courts where the food, being for the rich, was essentially Roman. Anthimus wrote his host a long letter on diet - De Observatione Ciborum - intended mainly for medical purposes but often outlining how to prepare the food in question. Most of the food Anthimus mentions shows Roman influence, but he also mentions specific Byzantine and Frankish specialties. This new edition of this very rare work is now BILINGUAL and includes additional notes on Anthimus' work as both a Roman and a medieval cookbook. The work also provides an overview of the cuisine the work addresses, an introduction to the very concept of a "dietetic" and comparisons of others with Anthimus' own, a list of Anthimus' remedies for specific ailments and an overview of his ideas and approach.< Less
Peas Recipes By Olivia Smith
eBook (ePub): $3.95
The name is also used to describe other edible seeds from the fabaceae such as the pigeon pea (cajanus cajan), the cowpea (vigna unguiculata), and the seeds from several species of lathyrus. The... More > average pea weighs between 0.1 and 0.36 gram.the immature peas (and in snow peas the tender pod as well) are used as a vegetable, fresh, frozen or canned; varieties of the species typically called field peas are grown to produce dry peas like the split pea shelled from the matured pod. These are the basis of pease porridge and pea soup, staples of medieval cuisine; in europe, consuming fresh immature green peas was an innovation of early modern cuisine. Try our peas recipes and be healthy and enjoy. This book contains peas recipes like… Green peas Quinoa with peas Peas and macaroni soup Caribbean curried peas Matar pulao and many more....< Less

Top 10

see more >
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5
My Wars My Wars By Richard Bushong
Paperback: $14.36
 
 
 
 
7
Vein Book Vein Book By Eric Dohner
Paperback: $10.00
 
 
8
About Face About Face By Eric Dohner
Paperback: $10.00
 
 
9
What May Come What May Come By Robert Grant
Paperback: $12.71
 
 
10